posts about or somewhat related to ‘nyc’

Meet the Lady Taxi Force of NYC

NY Times reports:

A new livery service starting Sept. 16 in New York City, Westchester County and Long Island will offer female drivers exclusively, for female riders, according to its founder. It will take requests for rides through an app, and dispatch drivers sporting hot pink pashmina scarves.

The service will be called SheTaxis — SheRides in New York City because of regulations barring it from using “taxi” in its name — and aims to serve women who may feel uncomfortable being driven by men, or who simply prefer the company of other women. The app will ask potential riders if there is a woman in their party. If not, they will be automatically redirected to other car services.

Related & Worth Watching: (posted above) is a really wonderful short doc produced by my dear friend Diana Diroy about what it’s like to be a female taxi driver in NYC. —Jihii

Journalists on the Big Screen

Vice News and Nitehawk Cinema (in Williamsburg, BK for all you New Yorkers) present Journalists in Film, six films over six months that: “feature journalists as noble truth-seekers, catalysts for change, hustlers, and friends through rich cinematic storytelling.” Check them out here.

And you can order food at your seats.

Bonus: For those who have already seen every movie starring a journalist out there, try this out: A short doc that flips the equation and profiles a dynamic, self-made, hustling source: Greg Packer, aka the most quoted man in news, who has been a source in so many stories that the AP banned its reporters from interviewing him.

Reporting Immigration, Population and the US Census
The US population grew to just over 316 million in 2013, according to the Census Bureau, which released its population numbers Monday. This is up from 313.8 million in 2012.
With the release of the data, news organizations are giving things a local spin. Take, for example, Florida closing in on New York as the country’s third most populous state; Utah as the country’s second fastest growing state; or Pennsylvania as one of the country’s slowest growing states.
In New York City, the talk is about how diverse the population is, with 37.2% of the population foreign-born.
Via WNYC:

The city’s foreign-born population has crossed the 3 million mark, a figure without precedent in municipal history and indicative of a decades-long metamorphosis of New York’s character.

If you have yourself some minutes, listen to this segment from the Brian Lehrer Show on New New Yorkers.
If you like to play with data, you can download the Census information here.
Image: Screenshot, Top 10 Immigrant Groups in Woodside, Queens, via NYC.gov’s Where are New York City’s Immigrants/Top Groups Living?

Reporting Immigration, Population and the US Census

The US population grew to just over 316 million in 2013, according to the Census Bureau, which released its population numbers Monday. This is up from 313.8 million in 2012.

With the release of the data, news organizations are giving things a local spin. Take, for example, Florida closing in on New York as the country’s third most populous state; Utah as the country’s second fastest growing state; or Pennsylvania as one of the country’s slowest growing states.

In New York City, the talk is about how diverse the population is, with 37.2% of the population foreign-born.

Via WNYC:

The city’s foreign-born population has crossed the 3 million mark, a figure without precedent in municipal history and indicative of a decades-long metamorphosis of New York’s character.

If you have yourself some minutes, listen to this segment from the Brian Lehrer Show on New New Yorkers.

If you like to play with data, you can download the Census information here.

Image: Screenshot, Top 10 Immigrant Groups in Woodside, Queens, via NYC.gov’s Where are New York City’s Immigrants/Top Groups Living?

navigatingmedia:

Her Girl Friday is throwing a free panel event on Monday, featuring four excellent digital projects and the ladies behind them. Open to all genders and professions. Details here. RSVP required as space is limited.
[Learn more about us here.] I hope you see you there! —Jihii 

navigatingmedia:

Her Girl Friday is throwing a free panel event on Monday, featuring four excellent digital projects and the ladies behind them. Open to all genders and professions. Details here. RSVP required as space is limited.

[Learn more about us here.] I hope you see you there! —Jihii 

Thursday: Drinks, Jams and Lady Journalists
These days, I’m hanging with a crew of lovely lady journos called Her Girl Friday: a Brooklyn-based group that produces engaging events with good vibes and concrete takeaways for (and featuring!) women in journalism and non-fiction storytelling. On July 11, we’re throwing a mixer: details here.
Networking Perks: If you are a lady journo and you want to a) share your work on our projector or b) project yourself on our projector (photo, contact info, fantastic things about you) e-mail me at jihii [at] the fjp.org. It’s an excellent opportunity to network. Bring your biz card too. We’ll have a jar for you to drop it in and send you home with someone’s else’s.—Jihii

Thursday: Drinks, Jams and Lady Journalists

These days, I’m hanging with a crew of lovely lady journos called Her Girl Friday: a Brooklyn-based group that produces engaging events with good vibes and concrete takeaways for (and featuring!) women in journalism and non-fiction storytelling. On July 11, we’re throwing a mixer: details here.

Networking Perks: If you are a lady journo and you want to a) share your work on our projector or b) project yourself on our projector (photo, contact info, fantastic things about you) e-mail me at jihii [at] the fjp.org. It’s an excellent opportunity to network. Bring your biz card too. We’ll have a jar for you to drop it in and send you home with someone’s else’s.—Jihii

Service Status
Blake pinged me to ask if we’d meet at the office tomorrow. I think I’ll ask how he proposes we get there.
Here’s the South Ferry subway stop in lower Manhattan, courtesy of the MTA. — Michael

Service Status

Blake pinged me to ask if we’d meet at the office tomorrow. I think I’ll ask how he proposes we get there.

Here’s the South Ferry subway stop in lower Manhattan, courtesy of the MTA. — Michael

Hurricane Sandy After Landfall
The Atlantic has compiled a series of beautifully striking photos of the aftermath of Sandy, which you can view here. 
Image: Seawater pours into the Ground Zero construction site in New York, on October 29, 2012 (AP/John Minchillo)

Hurricane Sandy After Landfall

The Atlantic has compiled a series of beautifully striking photos of the aftermath of Sandy, which you can view here

Image: Seawater pours into the Ground Zero construction site in New York, on October 29, 2012 (AP/John Minchillo)

New York City Subway, 86th Street
Via Stephen Dimmick.
UPDATE: via Elle Perez, “This is a low lying area in Brooklyn, which should be added to the caption.” After looking through a series of images (Google), and conferring with Jihii, whose beat was out there, it’s a Bay Ridge subway stop.

New York City Subway, 86th Street

Via Stephen Dimmick.

UPDATE: via Elle Perez, “This is a low lying area in Brooklyn, which should be added to the caption.” After looking through a series of images (Google), and conferring with Jihii, whose beat was out there, it’s a Bay Ridge subway stop.

Stormy New York City
Via Inga Sarda-Sorensen.

Stormy New York City

Via Inga Sarda-Sorensen.

Bundled, Buried & Behind Closed Doors

Ben Mendleson, a masters student at the New School, created this 10-minute documentary on how Internet infrastructure actually works as part of his graduate thesis.

His primary focus, a Manhattan building that houses one of the world’s largest digital nodes.

The Atlantic has a Q&A with him for more.

Drawing inspiration from the Great Depression collaboration between the US Farm Security Administration, photographers and documentarians, the non-profit collective Facing Change teamed up with the Library of Congress to capture America over 4th of July weekend.
Way back when, the FSA sent photographers across the country to document rural poverty and produced some of the most iconic images of that time. Facing Change has similar ambitions.
The Facing Change / Library of Congress collaboration allows the LOC to both archive and publish books based on Facing Change images. In a June press release, the Library wrote:

Facing Change was founded in 2009 by Pulitzer Prize-winning photographers Anthony Suau and Lucian Perkins and is a contemporary counterpart to the work done in the 1930s and 1940s by photographers employed by the Farm Security Administration, a federal project that documented the experiences of Americans at all economic levels during the Great Depression and World War II…
…The collaborative agreement announced today will allow the Library to publish books based on the Facing Change images, which document numerous aspects of contemporary American life through photographs, sound and video files. The Library will begin by exploring born-digital archiving and preservation practices with the Facing Change photographers, building on experience gained through the Library’s National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program.

Last Fall, the New York Times Lens Blog profiled Facing Change, explaining at the time:
Facing Change will pay photographers a day rate and reimburse expenses. Whatever money comes in — from foundations, individuals or the sale of images — will go back into financing more projects, [the organization’s founder Anthony] Suau said. “Nobody is going to get rich,” he said. “We just sincerely believe that it is important to document what’s going on within the country.”
Above: 4th of July celebration at Coney Island Beach by Anthony Suau | Facing Change July 4 Slideshow.

Drawing inspiration from the Great Depression collaboration between the US Farm Security Administration, photographers and documentarians, the non-profit collective Facing Change teamed up with the Library of Congress to capture America over 4th of July weekend.

Way back when, the FSA sent photographers across the country to document rural poverty and produced some of the most iconic images of that time. Facing Change has similar ambitions.

The Facing Change / Library of Congress collaboration allows the LOC to both archive and publish books based on Facing Change images. In a June press release, the Library wrote:

Facing Change was founded in 2009 by Pulitzer Prize-winning photographers Anthony Suau and Lucian Perkins and is a contemporary counterpart to the work done in the 1930s and 1940s by photographers employed by the Farm Security Administration, a federal project that documented the experiences of Americans at all economic levels during the Great Depression and World War II…

…The collaborative agreement announced today will allow the Library to publish books based on the Facing Change images, which document numerous aspects of contemporary American life through photographs, sound and video files. The Library will begin by exploring born-digital archiving and preservation practices with the Facing Change photographers, building on experience gained through the Library’s National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program.

Last Fall, the New York Times Lens Blog profiled Facing Change, explaining at the time:

Facing Change will pay photographers a day rate and reimburse expenses. Whatever money comes in — from foundations, individuals or the sale of images — will go back into financing more projects, [the organization’s founder Anthony] Suau said. “Nobody is going to get rich,” he said. “We just sincerely believe that it is important to document what’s going on within the country.”

Above: 4th of July celebration at Coney Island Beach by Anthony Suau | Facing Change July 4 Slideshow.

Saturday Brunch in NYC

ScribeLabs and the Future Journalism Project are having a brunch in NYC this Saturday from 1-6pm in SoHo. 

It’s a family, friend, significant other and temporary lover friendly affair so we hope you’ll consider coming on down.

Location: Cafe Noir
Address: Corner of Thompson and Grand. 
Map: http://bit.ly/kwNQDL
Time: 1-6
Music: Latin, Dub, Reggae and Afro Beats spun by Peter