posts about or somewhat related to ‘oops’

Premature Ignition
July 4th fireworks in San Diego Bay were cancelled last night after they all pretty much simultaneously exploded on three of the four barges they were to launch from.
Garden State Fireworks, the company that was producing the show, released the following statement:

"The Garden State Fireworks team will be working throughout the night to determine what technical problem caused the entire show to be launched in about 15 seconds.
"We apologize for the brevity of the show and the technical difficulties. More information will be posted when available."

Takeaway: Mistakes can lead to pretty pictures.
Image: Instagram of what happens when all your fireworks explode at once. Via benballer.

Premature Ignition

July 4th fireworks in San Diego Bay were cancelled last night after they all pretty much simultaneously exploded on three of the four barges they were to launch from.

Garden State Fireworks, the company that was producing the show, released the following statement:

"The Garden State Fireworks team will be working throughout the night to determine what technical problem caused the entire show to be launched in about 15 seconds.

"We apologize for the brevity of the show and the technical difficulties. More information will be posted when available."

Takeaway: Mistakes can lead to pretty pictures.

Image: Instagram of what happens when all your fireworks explode at once. Via benballer.

By Suspect in Custody
Via @jfdulac.

By Suspect in Custody

Via @jfdulac.

Suit Yourself
Or Shit Yourself as the mirrored text might say.
Choice is yours. We’re going with the former.
Via Reddit.

Suit Yourself

Or Shit Yourself as the mirrored text might say.

Choice is yours. We’re going with the former.

Via Reddit.

Oops: Bay Citizen Forgets to Renew Domain Name
There are a lot of things on the mind of a news organization. Somewhere down the to-do list is something along the lines of “renew domain name.”
Somehow, the Bay Citizen, a non-profit New York Times partner, forgot that one.
As Jim Romenesko reports, this is the least of the organization’s troubles:

The unexpected death of [investor Warren] Hellman [in December] left The Bay Citizen without its founder and benefactor. In September, the news organization’s founding editor-in-chief, Jonathan Weber, resigned abruptly. In October, the founding chief executive, Lisa Frazier, announced that she would resign in early 2012 for health reasons. Last week, the interim editor-in-chief, Steve Fainaru, a former Pulitzer prize-winning investigative reporter for The Washington Post, announced that he was resigning to pursue a book project.

Image: Screenshot of BayCitizen.org as of 10:15am EST with GoDaddy’s standard notice that the domain has expired.

Oops: Bay Citizen Forgets to Renew Domain Name

There are a lot of things on the mind of a news organization. Somewhere down the to-do list is something along the lines of “renew domain name.”

Somehow, the Bay Citizen, a non-profit New York Times partner, forgot that one.

As Jim Romenesko reports, this is the least of the organization’s troubles:

The unexpected death of [investor Warren] Hellman [in December] left The Bay Citizen without its founder and benefactor. In September, the news organization’s founding editor-in-chief, Jonathan Weber, resigned abruptly. In October, the founding chief executive, Lisa Frazier, announced that she would resign in early 2012 for health reasons. Last week, the interim editor-in-chief, Steve Fainaru, a former Pulitzer prize-winning investigative reporter for The Washington Post, announced that he was resigning to pursue a book project.

Image: Screenshot of BayCitizen.org as of 10:15am EST with GoDaddy’s standard notice that the domain has expired.

Well, give us a few points for trying.

We left New York for the more storm friendly confines of where we grew up in Narragansett, Rhode Island with the thought that we’d get some good hurricane tropical storm footage.

It started off well at the spot you see in the video above but as we moved up the beach (as in literally trying to outrun waves in a sprint down the beach to get to our spot), we were taken out by a biggie and our camera died.

Problem was were running past a sea wall to get back into open space when a wave came in. It was large and we got rolled 

So, we’re left with a mere minute of the Rhode Island coast line. 

But it’s a pretty good minute. 

And the attempt was great fun.

(Fun times aside: We — that’s my brother Peter in the video — grew up on this beach, know this beach, know these waters, know these waves and have swum these waves during past hurricane equivalents all our lives. If we had been anywhere else and not known the terrain, the currents, the ocean, there’s no way we would have run the beach to get a shot, and certainly would tell others not to do it as well.)

In September 2009, for example, [the German Press Agency] DPA ran a story that a German rap group, the Berlin Boys, had mounted a suicide attack on a small town called Bluewater in the United States. The story was backed up by the group’s Internet site, the KVPK television news site and a page in Wikipedia. It was later discovered that neither the town, nor the group, nor the television company existed. DPA called a press conference to apologise.

— Agence France-Press (the AFP) releases new social media guidelines but warns its reporters and editors that verification is still pretty important to pursue.

Jose Antonio Vargas did approach us with this idea some time ago, and I worked with him on the story for some weeks, with the intention of running it in Outlook. In the end, a decision was made here to pass on it. I’m delighted that the author found such a great home for the piece in the Sunday Magazine at The Times — certainly a fine second choice after The Washington Post Outlook section.

Message from Carlos Lozada, the editor of The Washington Post’s “Outlook” section to Chris Suellentrop, Story Editor, The New York Times Magazine, regarding the publication of Pulitzer-Winner Jose Antonio Vargas’ coming out story as an illegal immigrant in this Sunday’s New York Times Magazine.

Chris Seullentrap, New York Times, My (Legal) Editor’s Dream.

News Game: Media Criticism Via URL

Background Part 01: A core piece of Search Engine Optimization magic is to have human readable titles in your URL. For example: mySite.com/man-barks-at-moon/ rather than mySite.com/120984/.

Background Part 02: Older content management systems use the SEO unfriendly numbered system but organizations have implemented hacks to get around this.

Background Part 03: England’s Independent is one such organization. They’ve put a human readable title before a series of numbers that actually identify the article. Key point here though is that the readable part of the URL serves no purpose except for SEO. That is, if you change the words, the numbers still bring you to the correct article.

So why does this matter?

Because yesterday, a clever nutter turned this URL of a non-story about Kate Middleton

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/kate-middleton-jelly-bean-expected-to-fetch-500-2269573.html

into a viral piece of media criticism:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/utter-PR-fiction-but-people-love-this-shit-so-fuck-it-lets-just-print-it-2269573.html

Soon, many were passing along this new URL and the paper’s editor tried to respond.

Both URLs bring you to the same story. As a matter of fact, you can change any of the words before the “2269573” at the end and you’ll end up at the non-story. And, to keep things consistent, you can do this with any URL on Independent.co.uk that ends with a string of numbers.

So, as many consider the value of news games, and how to implement news games, here’s one paper that stumbled upon one quite unwittingly.

Slight Update: While the above still works, the Independent implemented a script today so that “faked” URLs work but transform back to what the paper intended.

I’ve commented before that I’m amazed at how fast bad information travels on the internet, but this morning it got pretty ridiculous.

Looks like WikiLeaks was the subject of a DOS attack last night, and their DNS provider who was everyDNS.net and not easyDNS, took the website down.

I’m not sure who the Pulitzer candidate was who started it, but somebody wrote that WikiLeaks had been taken down by us, easyDNS. By the time I woke up this morning I was inundated with emails and comments.

The incorrect info rippled through twitter like a zombie horde…

…It demonstrates the mob mentality in action: that people are far too ready to jump on a witch hunt, but point out their errors and very few, if any will own up to their mistakes. Throughout the morning we’ve been busily out there setting the record straight: not one so-called “internet journalist” or dipshit blogger has issued a simple “mea culpa” on this, or retweeted a clarification.