Posts tagged with ‘open access’

Web App Demands a “Democracy without Secrets”

Nulpunt, meaning zero in Dutch, is a web app that aggregates public government documents and allows registered users to rifle through them by topic, comment on sections of interest, and share their investigations over social media. Its a Dutch entity that only covers the Dutch government.

FJP: Elsewhere in Europe, the free-access movement is spreading. Earlier this week, the British government announced that all publicly funded scientific research will be made free and available to everyone by 2014. Yesterday, the EU made a similar initiative, which lays the groundwork for other member nations to follow suit.

UK Foundation to Launch Free Academic Journal
Over the past number of years a growing, vocal group of researchers has protested the rising cost and copyright restrictions academic publishers place on their journals.
Part of the issue is that many academic researchers are publicly funded and believe their work should be released under an Open Access model, made freely available to the public with few copyright restrictions.
This has led to thousands of academics to boycott publishing giants such as Elsevier over its practice of bundling journals (ie., institutions can’t buy one without purchasing many others) and placing restrictive copyright over journal articles). Much of this came to a head over the last few months with academic publisher support for the now-defunct US Research Works Act, a bill that would have prohibited open access mandates for federally funded research (eg., the US National Institutes of Health mandates that research conducted with its grants must be freely accessible online. The Research Works Act would have eliminated the mandate along with similar ones from other governmental agencies).
Enter into all this the Wellcome Trust, a UK-based foundation focussing on scientific research.
Via the BBC:

One of the world’s largest research charities, the Wellcome Trust, is to support efforts by scientists to make their work freely available for all.
The Trust is to establish a free, online publication to compete with established academic journals.
They say their new title could be a “game changer” forcing other publishing houses to increase free access.
More than 9,000 scientists are boycotting a leading paid-for publisher for restricting access to their papers.
The Wellcome Trust’s move is the latest salvo in a battle about ownership of, and access to, the published work of scientists that has been simmering underneath the sedate surface of scientific research for years.
The majority of the world’s scientific journals are accessible only via subscription, including highly influential titles such as Nature, Science and the New England Journal of Medicine.

This isn’t be the first attempt at Open Access academic publishing. A personal favorite is arXiv, and open archive hosted by Cornell University. For the math nerds, you might remember it as the place where Gregori Perelman originally published his solution to the century-old Poincaré conjecture.
But while not the first, the Wellcome Trust’s move is a very important step in increasing the flow and access to the world’s scientific research.

UK Foundation to Launch Free Academic Journal

Over the past number of years a growing, vocal group of researchers has protested the rising cost and copyright restrictions academic publishers place on their journals.

Part of the issue is that many academic researchers are publicly funded and believe their work should be released under an Open Access model, made freely available to the public with few copyright restrictions.

This has led to thousands of academics to boycott publishing giants such as Elsevier over its practice of bundling journals (ie., institutions can’t buy one without purchasing many others) and placing restrictive copyright over journal articles). Much of this came to a head over the last few months with academic publisher support for the now-defunct US Research Works Act, a bill that would have prohibited open access mandates for federally funded research (eg., the US National Institutes of Health mandates that research conducted with its grants must be freely accessible online. The Research Works Act would have eliminated the mandate along with similar ones from other governmental agencies).

Enter into all this the Wellcome Trust, a UK-based foundation focussing on scientific research.

Via the BBC:

One of the world’s largest research charities, the Wellcome Trust, is to support efforts by scientists to make their work freely available for all.

The Trust is to establish a free, online publication to compete with established academic journals.

They say their new title could be a “game changer” forcing other publishing houses to increase free access.

More than 9,000 scientists are boycotting a leading paid-for publisher for restricting access to their papers.

The Wellcome Trust’s move is the latest salvo in a battle about ownership of, and access to, the published work of scientists that has been simmering underneath the sedate surface of scientific research for years.

The majority of the world’s scientific journals are accessible only via subscription, including highly influential titles such as Nature, Science and the New England Journal of Medicine.

This isn’t be the first attempt at Open Access academic publishing. A personal favorite is arXiv, and open archive hosted by Cornell University. For the math nerds, you might remember it as the place where Gregori Perelman originally published his solution to the century-old Poincaré conjecture.

But while not the first, the Wellcome Trust’s move is a very important step in increasing the flow and access to the world’s scientific research.

Princeton Pushes Open Access Policy →

Via The Conversation:

Prestigious US academic institution Princeton University will prevent researchers from giving the copyright of scholarly articles to journal publishers, except in certain cases where a waiver may be granted.

The new rule is part of an Open Access policy aimed at broadening the reach of their scholarly work and encouraging publishers to adjust standard contracts that commonly require exclusive copyright as a condition of publication.

Universities pay millions of dollars a year for academic journal subscriptions. People without subscriptions, which can cost up to $25,000 a year for some journals or hundreds of dollars for a single issue, are often prevented from reading taxpayer funded research. Individual articles are also commonly locked behind pay walls.

No Social Media For You: Facebook to Yank California Inmate Pages →

Via CBS News:

Prison inmates in California found to have updated their Facebook profiles will lose their pages as part of a new policy designed to crack down against criminal abuse of social networks.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said it will turn over to Facebook account information it gathers on prison inmates who have updated their pages since being put behind bars. Facebook will then wipe out their pages for violating the company’s user policies.

"Access to social media allows inmates to circumvent our monitoring process and continue to engage in criminal activity," CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate said in a statement. "This new cooperation between law enforcement and Facebook will help protect the community and potentially avoid future victims."