Posts tagged with ‘osama bin laden’

Reuters: Navy SEAL in “material breach” of non-disclosure agreements with Osama bin Laden book

reuters:

Exclusive: Former Navy SEAL in “material breach” of non-disclousre agreements with Osama bin Laden book, according to the Pentagon’s top attorney in a letter obtained by Reuters. 

The Pentagon says it is considering “all remedies legally available” against the former Navy SEAL and all those acting in concert with him. The Pentagon says further public dissemination of the book “will aggravate your breach and violation of your agreements.”

More soon on Reuters.com.


The New York Times’ share of total page views to newspaper websites dropped by its largest margin in more than a year in April, the first full month that it had its paywall up. ComScore data shows that the NYT‘s share of newspaper website traffic was 10.6 percent last month, down from 13 percent in March and 13.5 percent in May 2010.

PaidContent had previously reported that Times execs saw the traffic drop-off as less severe than expected, bu it won’t be easy for The New York Times to put a positive spin on such a hasty decline. Lets consider the rapid succession of highly mediated events that have taken place since the wall went up: The Japan Earthquake, The Libyan Civil War, the near-shutdown of the federal government, the Royal Wedding, killer tornadoes in the South, and the death of Osama bin Laden, to name a few. 
Although the Japanese earthquake itself occurred on March 11, the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima-Daichi plant was still in a critical phase after one week. Irrespective of this single event, the number of natural disasters, international conflicts and other news making events have been boosting ratings of publishers such as CNN and Fox, as Mediaite reported.
As a non-subscriber to the Times, I constantly consider whether reading a new article on the site will put me over my month. For screaming headlines, and quick news bites, I instead go to The Huffington Post, one of many destinations I know will be carrying national and international news. 

The New York Times’ share of total page views to newspaper websites dropped by its largest margin in more than a year in April, the first full month that it had its paywall up. ComScore data shows that the NYT‘s share of newspaper website traffic was 10.6 percent last month, down from 13 percent in March and 13.5 percent in May 2010.

PaidContent had previously reported that Times execs saw the traffic drop-off as less severe than expected, bu it won’t be easy for The New York Times to put a positive spin on such a hasty decline. Lets consider the rapid succession of highly mediated events that have taken place since the wall went up: The Japan Earthquake, The Libyan Civil War, the near-shutdown of the federal government, the Royal Wedding, killer tornadoes in the South, and the death of Osama bin Laden, to name a few. 

Although the Japanese earthquake itself occurred on March 11, the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima-Daichi plant was still in a critical phase after one week. Irrespective of this single event, the number of natural disasters, international conflicts and other news making events have been boosting ratings of publishers such as CNN and Fox, as Mediaite reported.

As a non-subscriber to the Times, I constantly consider whether reading a new article on the site will put me over my month. For screaming headlines, and quick news bites, I instead go to The Huffington Post, one of many destinations I know will be carrying national and international news. 

You say Osama, I say Obama. We cool?

Craig Silverman walks us through a week of verbal gaffes:

Yes, U.S. media dominated the mistaken news. To name but a few examples, Geraldo Rivera said on air that, “Obama is dead, I don’t care … what am I saying?”, NPR’s website declared, “Obama Bin Laden Is Dead, Officials Say”, and the website for ABC World News with Diane Sawyer reported that, “Sources Tell ABC News’ Jon Karl That Obama Will Be Buried At Sea.”

Is it really so hard?

Did WikiLeaks Document Force US Hand on Bin Laden? →

Via the Guardian:

Buried in a document from 2008 released by WikiLeaks last week are notes from the interrogation of a Libyan, Abu al-Libi, who had apparently been with Bin Laden in Afghanistan…

…WikiLeaks released the report last week, prompting speculation that the US, afraid that its planned raid might be pre-empted, brought forward its attack.

The portion of the document in question can be seen here via DocumentCloud.

H/T: Slashdot.

The New York Times creates an interactive that captures people’s emotional response to the killing of Osama Bin Laden.

Users chart where they lay on the graph and enter brief text about their thoughts.

The call it the Bin Laden Mood Matrix and charted over 10,500 responses.

(Source: youtube.com)

The snuffing of Osama Bin Laden has already filled the Snake River Canyon with a torrent of coverage from newspapers, the Web, and television. The news output will only expand in the coming days, and as it does, remain skeptical about it. As we know from the coverage of other major breaking-news events—the Mumbai massacre, the death of Pat Tillman, Hurricane Katrina, the rescue of Jessica Lynch, to cite just a few examples—the earliest coverage of a big story is rarely reliable…

…[T]he fog of breaking news almost always cloaks the truth, especially when the deadline news event is a super-top-secret military operation conducted by commandos halfway around the world and the sources of the sexiest information go unnamed.
Television-based analysts are already asking if the killing of Bin Laden will provoke revenge attacks by al Qaeda. Is there a stupider question in the world? The implication, of course, is that now, al Qaeda will truly be pissed off at the U.S. Unlike in 2001, when al Qaeda was only marginally angry at the U.S.

International News Sites Cover bin Laden’s Death (at varying decibels) →

Via Columbia Journalism Review

I can read Arabic and English, but my students make me look primitive, as many of them speak three or more languages, including German, Spanish, Swedish, Italian, Danish, and French.

We took a look at news websites around the world, and I asked students to translate when necessary. Here are a few of the things we saw.

Front pages of today’s newspapers. 
Evidently there’s a popular file photo.

Front pages of today’s newspapers. 

Evidently there’s a popular file photo.

Osama Bin Laden Death Unknowingly Live-Blogged by Pakistani IT Manager:
As helicopters and other commotion began brewing around the compound of terrorist masterming, Osama bin Laden, Pakistani IT manager Sohaib Athar took to Twitter to describe the kerfuffle. The only problem was, he had no idea the gravity of the situation taking place nearby. It turns out the world’s most wanted man was making his final assault against American forces deployed in Pakistan.


Stories about the attack say that the $1 million compound where bin Laden lived had no telephone or internet service. Ironically, if it did, Athar’s tweets could have tipped off bin Laden about the attack

Osama Bin Laden Death Unknowingly Live-Blogged by Pakistani IT Manager:

As helicopters and other commotion began brewing around the compound of terrorist masterming, Osama bin Laden, Pakistani IT manager Sohaib Athar took to Twitter to describe the kerfuffle. The only problem was, he had no idea the gravity of the situation taking place nearby. It turns out the world’s most wanted man was making his final assault against American forces deployed in Pakistan.

Stories about the attack say that the $1 million compound where bin Laden lived had no telephone or internet service. Ironically, if it did, Athar’s tweets could have tipped off bin Laden about the attack