Posts tagged pentagon

The Future’s Getting Freaky
Via The BBC:

It’s been 30 years since the first message was sent over initial nodes of the Arpanet, the Pentagon-sponsored precursor to the internet. But this month, researchers announced something that could be equally historic: the passing of messages between two rat brains, the first step toward what they call the “brain net”.
Connecting the brains of two rats through implanted electrodes, scientists at Duke University demonstrated that in response to a visual cue, the trained response of one rat, called an encoder, could be mimicked without a visual cue in a second rat, called the decoder. In other words, the brain of one rat had communicated to the other.
"These experiments demonstrated the ability to establish a sophisticated, direct communication linkage between rat brains, and that the decoder brain is working as a pattern-recognition device,” said Miguel Nicolelis, a professor at Duke University School of Medicine. “So basically, we are creating an organic computer that solves a puzzle."
Whether or not the Duke University experiments turn out to be historic (some skepticism has already been raised), the work reflects a growing Pentagon interest in neuroscience for applications that range from such far-off ideas as teleoperation of military devices (think mind-controlled drones), to more near-term and less controversial technology, like prosthetics controlled by the human brain. In fact, like the Arpanet, the experiment on the rat “brain net” was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa).

BBC, Ten extraordinary Pentagon mind experiments.
For the rats, see, One rat brain ‘talks’ to another using electronic link.
Image: Turning insects into drones with implanted systems, by Darpa, via The BBC.

The Future’s Getting Freaky

Via The BBC:

It’s been 30 years since the first message was sent over initial nodes of the Arpanet, the Pentagon-sponsored precursor to the internet. But this month, researchers announced something that could be equally historic: the passing of messages between two rat brains, the first step toward what they call the “brain net”.

Connecting the brains of two rats through implanted electrodes, scientists at Duke University demonstrated that in response to a visual cue, the trained response of one rat, called an encoder, could be mimicked without a visual cue in a second rat, called the decoder. In other words, the brain of one rat had communicated to the other.

"These experiments demonstrated the ability to establish a sophisticated, direct communication linkage between rat brains, and that the decoder brain is working as a pattern-recognition device,” said Miguel Nicolelis, a professor at Duke University School of Medicine. “So basically, we are creating an organic computer that solves a puzzle."

Whether or not the Duke University experiments turn out to be historic (some skepticism has already been raised), the work reflects a growing Pentagon interest in neuroscience for applications that range from such far-off ideas as teleoperation of military devices (think mind-controlled drones), to more near-term and less controversial technology, like prosthetics controlled by the human brain. In fact, like the Arpanet, the experiment on the rat “brain net” was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa).

BBC, Ten extraordinary Pentagon mind experiments.

For the rats, see, One rat brain ‘talks’ to another using electronic link.

Image: Turning insects into drones with implanted systems, by Darpa, via The BBC.

Reuters: Navy SEAL in “material breach” of non-disclosure agreements with Osama bin Laden book

reuters:

Exclusive: Former Navy SEAL in “material breach” of non-disclousre agreements with Osama bin Laden book, according to the Pentagon’s top attorney in a letter obtained by Reuters. 

The Pentagon says it is considering “all remedies legally available” against the former Navy SEAL and all those acting in concert with him. The Pentagon says further public dissemination of the book “will aggravate your breach and violation of your agreements.”

More soon on Reuters.com.

Memorial Day, 2012
From 1991 to 2009, the US banned the media from taking pictures  of dead soldiers upon their return to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. The policy began under Bush the Elder during the first Gulf War.
This decision was overturned by the Obama administration in 2009. Current rules allow the media to take such pictures if they get permission from the soldier’s immediate family.
Image: Caskets of soldiers killed in Iraq being offloaded at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. Via the Pentagon, undated.

Memorial Day, 2012

From 1991 to 2009, the US banned the media from taking pictures  of dead soldiers upon their return to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. The policy began under Bush the Elder during the first Gulf War.

This decision was overturned by the Obama administration in 2009. Current rules allow the media to take such pictures if they get permission from the soldier’s immediate family.

Image: Caskets of soldiers killed in Iraq being offloaded at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. Via the Pentagon, undated.

Hacking was in the news this week. If you looked, you’d see something along the lines of:
Sony Hacked Again (edit: Palm, meet face)
Mac trojan evades Apple’s brand new security fix
Spear phishers target gov, military officials’ Gmail accounts
Wave of Trojans breaks over Android
Lockheed Martin Network Subject to Hacks
The British secret service got in on the action with a confectionary twist by hacking Al Qaeda’s English-language magazine and swapping out bomb making instructions with cupcake recipes. And the US military has a new report coming out that states that hacking can be considered an act of war.
And that’s where ants come in.
US researchers are developing software that mimics ant-like behavior in order to combat unwanted network intrusions.
Via SecurityWeek:

Errin Fulp, a computer science professor at Wake Forest University, is creating an “army of digital ants” that can roam computer networks looking for threats, and hopes the technology can transform how we think about cyber security. Fulp says the technology is different than traditional security software models because it adapts rapidly to changing threats. “In nature, we know that ants defend against threats very successfully,” Fulp said. “They can ramp up their defense rapidly, and then resume routine behavior quickly after an intruder has been stopped. We’re trying to achieve that same framework in a computer system.”…
…This summer, Fulp is working with scientists at PNNL in Richland, Washington to train the “digital ants” to turn loose into the power grid to seek out computer viruses trying to wreak havoc on the system.
If the approach proves successful in safeguarding the power grid, it could have wide-ranging applications on protecting anything connected to SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) networks, software systems that monitor and control industrial processes, such as those in nuclear power plants, and other industrial facilities such as water and sewer management systems to mass transit systems to manufacturing systems.

Give it up for the little guys and, of course, biomimicry.
Photo: Ants and Aphids by Binux via Flickr/Creative Commons.

Hacking was in the news this week. If you looked, you’d see something along the lines of:

The British secret service got in on the action with a confectionary twist by hacking Al Qaeda’s English-language magazine and swapping out bomb making instructions with cupcake recipes. And the US military has a new report coming out that states that hacking can be considered an act of war.

And that’s where ants come in.

US researchers are developing software that mimics ant-like behavior in order to combat unwanted network intrusions.

Via SecurityWeek:

Errin Fulp, a computer science professor at Wake Forest University, is creating an “army of digital ants” that can roam computer networks looking for threats, and hopes the technology can transform how we think about cyber security. Fulp says the technology is different than traditional security software models because it adapts rapidly to changing threats. “In nature, we know that ants defend against threats very successfully,” Fulp said. “They can ramp up their defense rapidly, and then resume routine behavior quickly after an intruder has been stopped. We’re trying to achieve that same framework in a computer system.”…

…This summer, Fulp is working with scientists at PNNL in Richland, Washington to train the “digital ants” to turn loose into the power grid to seek out computer viruses trying to wreak havoc on the system.

If the approach proves successful in safeguarding the power grid, it could have wide-ranging applications on protecting anything connected to SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) networks, software systems that monitor and control industrial processes, such as those in nuclear power plants, and other industrial facilities such as water and sewer management systems to mass transit systems to manufacturing systems.

Give it up for the little guys and, of course, biomimicry.

Photo: Ants and Aphids by Binux via Flickr/Creative Commons.

Pentagon Likes Social Media

We noted the other day that the US Military continues its foray into the Social Media world by releasing a citizen reporting tool for the iPhone.

That doesn’t mean that the Pentagon is shunning other networks like Twitter and Facebook. Last week, William Lynne, the Deputy Defense Secretary, reauthorized social media guidelines (pdf) that allows troops to post and like and share and do all those other social media things until January 2012.

Perhaps the military will even learn a thing or two.

Via Wired:

At his confirmation hearing today to be Army chief of staff, Gen. Martin Dempsey said the Army would need to get better at using social media (and online role-playing games!) if it wanted to attract the service’s next generation of leaders.