Posts tagged pew

If you’re an 18-29 year old black or hispanic woman with some high school education, and living in a household that makes under $30 thousand a year, you’re most likely a texting machine. (Select image to embiggen.)
The Pew Internet and American Life Project study on Americans and Text Messages finds young adults in general have mighty thumbs:

18-24 year olds send or receive an average of 109.5 text messages per day—that works out to more than 3,200 messages per month. The median 18-24 year old texter sends or receives 50 texts per day (or around 1,500 messages per month).
One quarter of 18-24 year old text messaging users (23%) report sending or receiving more than 100 texts per day.
Just over one in ten (12%) say that they send or receive more than 200 messages on an average day—that equals 6,000 or more messages per month.

Image: Pew Internet and American Life Study via Flowing Data.

If you’re an 18-29 year old black or hispanic woman with some high school education, and living in a household that makes under $30 thousand a year, you’re most likely a texting machine. (Select image to embiggen.)

The Pew Internet and American Life Project study on Americans and Text Messages finds young adults in general have mighty thumbs:

  • 18-24 year olds send or receive an average of 109.5 text messages per day—that works out to more than 3,200 messages per month. The median 18-24 year old texter sends or receives 50 texts per day (or around 1,500 messages per month).
  • One quarter of 18-24 year old text messaging users (23%) report sending or receiving more than 100 texts per day.
  • Just over one in ten (12%) say that they send or receive more than 200 messages on an average day—that equals 6,000 or more messages per month.

Image: Pew Internet and American Life Study via Flowing Data.

A Pew Research report indicates that US Spanish-language news media is doing much better than its English-language counterpart. For example, Spanish-language newspapers and magazines have seen less circulation loss over the last few years, and actually grew between 2009-2010.
As Leslie Berestein Rojas from Southern California Public Radio writes:

[T]he most interesting twist is in print media: Latinos like to read newspapers, and continue to do so. An industry study from 2009 showed that as mainstream and national newspapers endured readership declines, Spanish-language newspapers continued to be a top media choice, with 82 percent of Latinos surveyed reporting that they read them.

One instinctual explanation is immigration and the rise of the US Hispanic population. But, as the report points out, the vast majority of the Hispanic population increase is second and third generation bilingual children who consume both Spanish and English-language media.
Report | Rojas’.

A Pew Research report indicates that US Spanish-language news media is doing much better than its English-language counterpart. For example, Spanish-language newspapers and magazines have seen less circulation loss over the last few years, and actually grew between 2009-2010.

As Leslie Berestein Rojas from Southern California Public Radio writes:

[T]he most interesting twist is in print media: Latinos like to read newspapers, and continue to do so. An industry study from 2009 showed that as mainstream and national newspapers endured readership declines, Spanish-language newspapers continued to be a top media choice, with 82 percent of Latinos surveyed reporting that they read them.

One instinctual explanation is immigration and the rise of the US Hispanic population. But, as the report points out, the vast majority of the Hispanic population increase is second and third generation bilingual children who consume both Spanish and English-language media.

Report | Rojas’.

Via the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project:

Among internet users, social networking sites are most popular with women and young adults under age 30. Young adult women ages 18-29 are the power users of social networking; fully 89% of those who are online use the sites overall and 69% do so on an average day. As of May 2011, there are no significant differences in use of social networking sites based on race and ethnicity, household income, education level, or whether the internet user lives in an urban, suburban, or rural environment. 

Let us bow before our power users.

Select images to enlarge.

Job: Pew Web Coordinator

Like the Internet? Like research? Got some design and Web skills to boot?

Then the Pew Internet and American Life Project has a job for you:

The Web Coordinator is the staffer most immediately involved in the day-to-day operations of the Pew Internet Project’s web site and digital dissemination strategies. The Web Coordinator helps conceive and produce special web-only reports and graphics and assesses new applications to disseminate Project work to key audiences. In addition, the Web Coordinator functions as a researcher in the Project’s reports and publications, especially concentrating on graphics displays of Project data. The Web Coordinator will identify the most useful formats to share Pew Internet data and the best platforms by which to disseminate it. The Web Coordinator will work with the Project’s Associate Director for digital strategy and Administrative Manager in the technical management and strategic development of the Project’s website.

Non-Profit News? It's Mostly Ideological

A new Pew Research Center report says emerging nonprofit news sources are often partisan, and generally opaque about their funding.

The study includes 46 US non-profit news sites launched since 2005. Via the Project for Excellence in Journalism:

Who are these new players in journalism? Are these sites delivering, as they generally purport to be, independent and disinterested news reporting? Or are some of them more political and ideological in their reporting? How can audiences assess this for themselves? In short, what role are these operations playing in the changing ecosystem of news?…

…In general, the more ideological sites tended to be funded mostly or entirely by one parent organization-though that parent group may have various contributors. They tended to be less transparent about who they are and where their funding comes from. And they tended to produce less content-in some cases generating one or two stories per week produced by a single staffer.

Sites that offered a mixed or balanced political perspective, on the other hand, tended to have multiple funders, more revenue streams, more transparency and more content with a deeper bench of reporters. The six most transparent sites studied, for instance, were among the most balanced in the news they produced.

Which is another way of saying that astroturfing has come to the newsroom.

This is a snippet of our interview with Lee Rainie, the Director of Pew’s Internet & American Life Project, at the ARF audience measurement conference.

The second half of our interview focused on the changing nature of how people consume news. Pew ran a research project that asked questions like, ‘how have people changed their news diet?’ In this research, they found that regardless of where a person found a piece of news, they are supplementing their news diet with online research to do a deeper dive on topics they are really interested in.

Some other interesting topics Lee Rainie covered include:
- The fact that the average age of Facebook users is increasing and what that has to do with marketing on Facebook
- How marketers take advantage of mobile video
- The role Twitter plays in fact checking for journalists
- The rise of citizen journalists
- The sustainability of the business models associated with hyperlocal news
- People curating their own internet news

For the whole video and article see Scribe Media 

Chikodi noted the other day a new study from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism that explores how people navigate the digital news environment.
To do so, Pew looked at the top 25 most popular news sites in the United States and explored audience behavior in a few main categories: how people get to news sites, how long they stay, how much they explore the site, and where they go when they leave. Pew’s statistics were provided by Nielsen.
A surprising finding is just how insignificant Twitter is in driving traffic back to news sites.
"Of the top 21 sites for which there were data," the report’s authors write, "Twitter showed up as referring links to just nine. And for all but one of those nine, Twitter sent only about 1% of total traffic."
This isn’t to say that Twitter itself is insignificant. Only that as a linking — or shared bookmarking — ecosystem, publishers have better options elsewhere if they want to drive traffic back to their sites. Among them, the usual suspects: Google and Facebook. Also among them is the original social tool: email.
Report.

Chikodi noted the other day a new study from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism that explores how people navigate the digital news environment.

To do so, Pew looked at the top 25 most popular news sites in the United States and explored audience behavior in a few main categories: how people get to news sites, how long they stay, how much they explore the site, and where they go when they leave. Pew’s statistics were provided by Nielsen.

A surprising finding is just how insignificant Twitter is in driving traffic back to news sites.

"Of the top 21 sites for which there were data," the report’s authors write, "Twitter showed up as referring links to just nine. And for all but one of those nine, Twitter sent only about 1% of total traffic."

This isn’t to say that Twitter itself is insignificant. Only that as a linking — or shared bookmarking — ecosystem, publishers have better options elsewhere if they want to drive traffic back to their sites. Among them, the usual suspects: Google and Facebook. Also among them is the original social tool: email.

Report.

wedia:

TV and newspapers decline, radio remains stable, as Internet continues to rise as public’s main news source. From January 4, 2011 PEW study.

Nicely done.

wedia:

TV and newspapers decline, radio remains stable, as Internet continues to rise as public’s main news source. From January 4, 2011 PEW study.

Nicely done.

Pew Research: The Social Side of the Internet

The study found…

  • 62% of all Americans said the internet has had a major impact on the ability of [volunteer] groups [for a social cause] to draw attention to an issue. Some 68% of internet users said that.
  • 53% of the online Americans who are active in [volunteer] groups [for a social cause] say the internet has had a major impact on their ability to keep up with news and information about their groups; 30% say the internet has had a minor impact on that.

Kind of “no duh,” but also nice to see the numbers and the ideas approached scientifically.

People Who Do the Internet Thing Are More Social

Gone are the days when loners ruled the Webs. The Pew Internet and American Life Project reports that the Internet — and social networking in particular — is increasing our participation in civic engaged.

Via PEW:

A new national survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project has found that 75% of all American adults are active in some kind of voluntary group or organization and internet users are more likely than others to be active: 80% of internet users participate in groups, compared with 56% of non-internet users. Moreover, social media users are even more likely to be active: 82% of social network users and 85% of Twitter users are group participants.
The Internets continue to outpace other platforms as the source for news consumption.
Via Pew Research Center for People and the Press:

The internet is slowly closing in on television as Americans’ main source of national and international news…
…An analysis of how different generations are getting their news suggests that these trends are likely to continue. In 2010, for the first time, the internet has surpassed television as the main source of national and international news for people younger than 30…
…Among those 30 to 49, the internet is on track to equal, or perhaps surpass, television as the main source of national and international news within the next few years.

The complete report is downloadable via Pew and includes the survey questions asked.

The Internets continue to outpace other platforms as the source for news consumption.

Via Pew Research Center for People and the Press:

The internet is slowly closing in on television as Americans’ main source of national and international news…

…An analysis of how different generations are getting their news suggests that these trends are likely to continue. In 2010, for the first time, the internet has surpassed television as the main source of national and international news for people younger than 30…

…Among those 30 to 49, the internet is on track to equal, or perhaps surpass, television as the main source of national and international news within the next few years.

The complete report is downloadable via Pew and includes the survey questions asked.

There’s a whole Internet outside of Twitter

Via Mandy Jenkins, Social Media Producer, TBD.com.

When all of your friends, your coworkers, your spouse and the media you consume are on Twitter, it may seem logical to believe a great deal of America is as well. This is a dangerous assumption for journalists and media organizations to make – and I know I’ve been guilty of it from time to time.

While I still think it is very important for journalists to use Twitter, the following facts must be emblazoned on the brains of media Twitterati:

  • Twitter represents a very small group of people in your area.
  • Being popular on Twitter doesn’t necessarily make one popular or important in real life.
  • Re-tweets, replies and Twitter referrals do not adequately represent the larger interest in or importance of your work as a journalist.
  • Most people that use Twitter don’t use it to get news.

So what does all of this mean?

First of all, all of these stats boil down to one unavoidable fact: Twitter (and social media in general) can’t be your only tool for reaching out. It’s excellent for engaging part of your audience, note taking, networking and consuming media – but it isn’t going to reach a lot of your online audience.