Posts tagged with ‘photography’

If Only For a Second

Absolute must watch. 20 cancer patients participate in a unique makeover experience. Runtime~3:44. By the Mimi Foundation.

Love is Not A Crime
The News, Part 01: India’s Supreme Court upholds a 153-year-old law criminalizing “gay sex” and overturns a four-year-old ruling that recognized same-sex relationships.
The News, Part 02: The UN says that the ruling violates international law and asks India to reconsider.
The News, Part 03: Australia’s High Court overturned legislation allowing gay marriage. Twenty-seven previously married couples will have their unions annulled.  
Image: A human rights activist protests in India, as shown on the front page of The Guardian, newspaper edition.

Love is Not A Crime

The News, Part 01: India’s Supreme Court upholds a 153-year-old law criminalizing “gay sex” and overturns a four-year-old ruling that recognized same-sex relationships.

The News, Part 02: The UN says that the ruling violates international law and asks India to reconsider.

The News, Part 03: Australia’s High Court overturned legislation allowing gay marriage. Twenty-seven previously married couples will have their unions annulled.  

Image: A human rights activist protests in India, as shown on the front page of The Guardian, newspaper edition.

It’s also possible that we actively opt not to pay much attention to the scenes we capture, because we’re counting on photos to record everything so we don’t mentally have to. If that’s the case, that would mean that you’re farming out your memory to Instagram as you move through the world.

Emily Badger, How Instagram Alters Your Memory, The Atlantic Cities.

To test this, Henkel, a researcher at Fairfield University, concocted a series of experiments leading undergraduate students on guided tours through the university’s Bellarmine Museum of Art. They looked at paintings, sculptures, pottery, jewelry and mosaics. The students were given digital cameras to photograph some of the objects and were told to simply observe the others. The next day, they were given a series of recall tests, trying to detect which objects they remembered best in name and detail.

As it turned out, people remembered fewer of the photographed objects, and fewer of the details about them, relative to the pieces of art they’d actively observed with their own eyes.

…There was one catch in Henkel’s findings: She also asked participants to zoom in on and photograph the details of some of these art pieces. And people who did that were much better at remembering the works of art that those who simply wedged entire objects into one frame and then walked away. Perhaps, by focusing consciously on the details, we can cut back on some of this “photo-taking impairment effect.”

Just a Group of Snow Monkeys Enjoying a Japanese Hot Spring

Via Slate:

The relaxing sensation of soaking in an onsen—or Japanese hot spring—is so popular that even the country’s monkeys take part in the tradition. At Jigokudani (Hell’s Valley) Park just outside Nagano, snow monkeys soak in the hot springs on winter days and return to the forest at night.

Images: Snow Monkeys in Jigokudani Park, via Slate and Atlas Obscura. Select to embiggen.

A Cautionary Tale on the Use of a Photo →

Seattle Times:

Last week, The Seattle Times published a story headlined, “Women-only swim times spark emotional debate,” about a controversy over women-only hours at a pool in Tukwila. The women had requested the female-only swim times for both body-image and religious reasons.

The story was accompanied by a portrait I took of sisters Faisa Farole and Jamila Farole, who were trying to preserve female-only swim times.

This week, I learned that the Fox News network aired a story about a Minnesota swimming pool that was setting aside hours for Muslim women to swim. Fox suggested this was an example of the growing influence of Sharia law in the U.S., and included The Seattle Times photo from the Tukwila pool.

The Fox video clip, which has been shared on blogs across the country and even ran on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, began this way: “The minority becoming the majority at one community pool. Sharia Law is now changing everything…”

The Seattle Times did not authorize use of this photograph on Fox News. We are not sure how Fox News acquired this image, though it could be through a labeling mistake by The Associated Press. The Seattle Times often distributes images through the AP but with language that prevents use by television networks.

Using my photo to illustrate a story on a swimming program in Minnesota, under the title “Sharia Law: Swim Class for Somali Muslim Girls,” is unfair to the young women in the photo and misleads viewers.

Uncensored Instagram Photos from North Korea
via Just Something:

David Guttenfelder is the Associated Press Chief Photographer for Asia, almost a legend in photojournalism. He’s been traveling the world for the most part of his life documenting events like the genocide in Rwanda, the Israeli Palestinian conflict, three different Olympic games and many other historical events. He is a seven-time World Press Award winner and has gained various other awards during his brilliant career.
He’s recently been documenting North Korea and since their authorities loosened a bit their restrict policies about photojournalism he’s been one of the first photographers allowed to bring a smartphone inside the country. A 3G network is now available for visitors, so he’s been able to take pictures with his camera phone on the streets of Pyongyang like he could have done in any other part of the world and for the first time he had the chance to upload them on Instagram while still in the country, marking a milestone in the history of photojournalism.
The event is momentous and thanks to David we can now watch for the first time ever some uncensored real life moments directly from North Korea. In the following gallery you will see our favorites among the pictures he took there.

Check them all out here.
Image: Students at a concert (via David Guttenfelder on Instagram).

Uncensored Instagram Photos from North Korea

via Just Something:

David Guttenfelder is the Associated Press Chief Photographer for Asia, almost a legend in photojournalism. He’s been traveling the world for the most part of his life documenting events like the genocide in Rwanda, the Israeli Palestinian conflict, three different Olympic games and many other historical events. He is a seven-time World Press Award winner and has gained various other awards during his brilliant career.

He’s recently been documenting North Korea and since their authorities loosened a bit their restrict policies about photojournalism he’s been one of the first photographers allowed to bring a smartphone inside the country. A 3G network is now available for visitors, so he’s been able to take pictures with his camera phone on the streets of Pyongyang like he could have done in any other part of the world and for the first time he had the chance to upload them on Instagram while still in the country, marking a milestone in the history of photojournalism.

The event is momentous and thanks to David we can now watch for the first time ever some uncensored real life moments directly from North Korea. In the following gallery you will see our favorites among the pictures he took there.

Check them all out here.

Image: Students at a concert (via David Guttenfelder on Instagram).

The Psychology of Selfies & A Handmade Pinhole Camera
We learned this week that the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year is selfie, the informal noun defined as “a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.” It was added to the Oxford Dictionary Online (not the Oxford English Dictionary), which bases its entries on current and practical word usage, meaning they can be removed when they are out of use. 
Blog posts about the psychology of the selfie abound. It’s a cheap fad. It’s a an evaluator of social reach. It’s a modern iteration of the self-portrait fueled by a hunger for social feedback. It’s a reflection of our loneliness and desire for image control. And on and on.
And then there is this.
Photographer Tatiano Altberg teaches children in a Rio de Janeiro favela how to make pinhole cameras out of recycled cans. There is no viewfinder and no button. They learn to create narratives through their photos, and to take self-portraits.
Lens Blog:

But unlike the countless “selfies” they were already used to seeing on social networks, these forced them to be more introspective, considering both their mood and environment.
“The challenge of working with pinhole photography is to make the self-portrait a process of reflection about one’s self — a product of an intention,” she said. “The idea is not to take photos in an automatic way, with poses and gestures that are seen in the pictures teenagers take with their cellphones and digital cameras. It’s necessary to pay attention to the surroundings and think before making an image. Pinhole is a slow process of creation that demands a lot of thought.”
The payoff has come with students who have become excited about the possibilities of self-expression. Jailton Nunes was a skeptical 12-year-old when he started the workshop, deflecting any compliment with jokes. But over time, he came to embrace the project, and a self-portrait of his was used on the cover of “Everyday My Thoughts Are Different,” which was published this year.
“Another photo taken by him that is very significant is the one where he appears beside a miniature sofa,” Ms. Altberg said. “He looks like a giant. The image has special symbolic meaning since he was explicitly self-conscious about his height, something that diminished throughout the year as he gained confidence.”


FJP: Here’s a thought. For young teens who live busy lives in crowded spaces (Rio or elsewhere) that are then compounded by an abundance of digital imagery in online social worlds, it’s difficult to find the space to know yourself, to construct an image of yourself for yourself and to capture that image. In a sense, the digital selfie is a way to try to create and preserve a controllable record of who you are in an otherwise uncontrollable world of too many records. It’s a very human need. If we look at it that way, the potential for teaching projects like Altberg’s is enormous.—Jihii
Image: Yasmin Lopez, via Brazilian Stories and Selfies Through a Pinhole, NY Times.

The Psychology of Selfies & A Handmade Pinhole Camera

We learned this week that the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year is selfie, the informal noun defined as “a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.” It was added to the Oxford Dictionary Online (not the Oxford English Dictionary), which bases its entries on current and practical word usage, meaning they can be removed when they are out of use. 

Blog posts about the psychology of the selfie abound. It’s a cheap fad. It’s a an evaluator of social reach. It’s a modern iteration of the self-portrait fueled by a hunger for social feedback. It’s a reflection of our loneliness and desire for image control. And on and on.

And then there is this.

Photographer Tatiano Altberg teaches children in a Rio de Janeiro favela how to make pinhole cameras out of recycled cans. There is no viewfinder and no button. They learn to create narratives through their photos, and to take self-portraits.

Lens Blog:

But unlike the countless “selfies” they were already used to seeing on social networks, these forced them to be more introspective, considering both their mood and environment.

“The challenge of working with pinhole photography is to make the self-portrait a process of reflection about one’s self — a product of an intention,” she said. “The idea is not to take photos in an automatic way, with poses and gestures that are seen in the pictures teenagers take with their cellphones and digital cameras. It’s necessary to pay attention to the surroundings and think before making an image. Pinhole is a slow process of creation that demands a lot of thought.”

The payoff has come with students who have become excited about the possibilities of self-expression. Jailton Nunes was a skeptical 12-year-old when he started the workshop, deflecting any compliment with jokes. But over time, he came to embrace the project, and a self-portrait of his was used on the cover of “Everyday My Thoughts Are Different,” which was published this year.

“Another photo taken by him that is very significant is the one where he appears beside a miniature sofa,” Ms. Altberg said. “He looks like a giant. The image has special symbolic meaning since he was explicitly self-conscious about his height, something that diminished throughout the year as he gained confidence.”

FJP: Here’s a thought. For young teens who live busy lives in crowded spaces (Rio or elsewhere) that are then compounded by an abundance of digital imagery in online social worlds, it’s difficult to find the space to know yourself, to construct an image of yourself for yourself and to capture that image. In a sense, the digital selfie is a way to try to create and preserve a controllable record of who you are in an otherwise uncontrollable world of too many records. It’s a very human need. If we look at it that way, the potential for teaching projects like Altberg’s is enormous.—Jihii

Image: Yasmin Lopez, via Brazilian Stories and Selfies Through a Pinhole, NY Times.

coverjunkie:


Liberation (France)
Impact!"A visual shock! For the first time in its history Liberation is published WITHOUT photographs. To show the power and importance of photography at a time when the industry is facing unprecedented challenges. To support all photojournalists, fashion photographers, portraitists, or conceptual artists"I love this, not every dude with a Nikon is a photographer, there’s a need to make this clear. Last weeks cover Liberation via British Journal of Photography

coverjunkie:

Liberation (France)

Impact!

"A visual shock! For the first time in its history Liberation is published WITHOUT photographs. To show the power and importance of photography at a time when the industry is facing unprecedented challenges. To support all photojournalists, fashion photographers, portraitists, or conceptual artists"

I love this, not every dude with a Nikon is a photographer, there’s a need to make this clear. Last weeks cover Liberation 

via British Journal of Photography

Super Typhoon Haiyan

Donations can be made to many organizations, but here’s The Red Cross, UNICEF and the World Food Programs.

As Jessica Alexander writes in Slate, “Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan need your help. But send money, not your hand-me-downs.”

Additionally, Google’s crisis tools have been activated with Person Finder available via SMS.

ImagesA boy gathers coins from the wreckage (Erik de Castro/Reuters); A woman mourns over her dead husband’s body (Noel Celis/Reuters); Residents walk among debris (Erik de Castro/Reuters), via Slate.

 

Beautiful Libraries

Via Huffington Post UK

These stunning images show some of the great libraries of the world, compiled for a book by Dr James Campbell, who visited more than 80 buildings in 20 countries for his own tome entitled: The Library: A World History.

The book, which took three years to research and includes these pictures by photographer Will Pryce, takes in some of the great rooms of learning from around the globe, from Trinity Hall in Cambridge to the Library Of Congress in Washington. There are even images of the Malatestiana Biblioteca in Cesena, Italy, regarded as the oldest library in the world, dating to 1452.

Images: The Tripitaka Koreana at the Haeinsa Temple in South Korea (top); The library at Admont Abbey in Austria (left); The Biblioteca Joanina in Coimbra, Portugal (right); The Chapter Library, Noyon Cathedral, France (bottom), by Will Pryce via HuffPo UK. Select to embiggen.

Typhoon Haiyan

Via the BBC:

More than 120 people have been reported killed by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines after the massive storm swept through on Friday.

Aviation officials said 100 bodies were lying in the streets of the city of Tacloban. Local journalists reported 20 bodies in a church in a nearby town…

…The storm made landfall shortly before dawn on Friday, bringing gusts that reached 379km/h (235 mph), with waves as high as 15m (45ft), bringing up to 400mm (15.75 inches) of rain in places.

Images: Haiyan approaches the Philippines, via the Japan Meteorological Agency and EUMETSAT (top). Detailed infrared image of Haiyan’s Eye, via NOAA (middle). Haiyan rolls into the Philippines, via University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center (bottom). Select to embiggen.

NEXT DAY UPDATEPhilippines Typhoon Devastation Is Far Worse Than Expected As Death Toll Climbs to 10,000, via Slate.

William Mumler’s Paranormal Photography
In the 1860s, photographer William Mumler claimed that he could photograph ghosts. He’d take portraits of living people with faint images of the departed lurking behind them, or at times, comforting them, as with the photo he took of Mary Todd being comforted by the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln. Some believed he could actually channel the dead. Others were skeptical and felt he was exploiting the grieving. His insistence that he actually brought back the dead eventually lead to a famous trial in 1869. Read about it in The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer, by Louis Kaplan. It’s a fascinating story.
Minnesota UPress: 

Mumler’s case was an early example of investigative journalism intersecting with a criminal trial that, at its essence, set science against religion. The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer is the definitive resource for this unique and fascinating moment in American history and provides insights into today’s ghosts in the machine. 

Nothing like a deep dive into paranormal photography to celebrate Halloween. Happy All Things Scary, from the FJP.
Image: John J. Glover with a spirit (possibly of his mother), via Wikimedia Commons.

William Mumler’s Paranormal Photography

In the 1860s, photographer William Mumler claimed that he could photograph ghosts. He’d take portraits of living people with faint images of the departed lurking behind them, or at times, comforting them, as with the photo he took of Mary Todd being comforted by the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln. Some believed he could actually channel the dead. Others were skeptical and felt he was exploiting the grieving. His insistence that he actually brought back the dead eventually lead to a famous trial in 1869. Read about it in The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer, by Louis Kaplan. It’s a fascinating story.

Minnesota UPress

Mumler’s case was an early example of investigative journalism intersecting with a criminal trial that, at its essence, set science against religion. The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer is the definitive resource for this unique and fascinating moment in American history and provides insights into today’s ghosts in the machine. 

Nothing like a deep dive into paranormal photography to celebrate Halloween. Happy All Things Scary, from the FJP.

Image: John J. Glover with a spirit (possibly of his mother), via Wikimedia Commons.

Found in an Argentine Limousine
The NY Times Lens Blog features a series by Myriam Meloni, an Italian photographer, who, while recovering from an injury in Argentina, began spending a lot of time in taxis to attend physical therapy sessions. Over the course of things, she learned that her cabby also drove limos, and had interesting stories about what went on in them. So she chose a uniform angle and “transformed the limo’s back seat into a shoe-box theater, with her as an audience of one, witnessing a parade of scenes.” See the photos here.
One of the people she encountered was Leila, a 23-year-old woman working as a stripper, who—to Meloni’s shock—had sex with four men in the car.
Lens Blog:

“But what impressed me is that I saw the girl manage the situation so easily,” said Ms. Meloni, adding that, through it all, she thought the woman projected poise. But when the four men left and the vehicle drove along, she saw a complete change in the woman (Slide 6). And when the veneer of a passenger’s constructed image was pierced, the contrast with reality could be startling.
“When I saw her totally alone, when I started to see her face, how she looked, how young she was and I took this portrait, I had a special feeling with this woman,” Ms. Meloni said. “Her attitude was totally different. She was just acting.”

She later photographed and wrote about Leila’s life in the essay Important Things Are Said Softly, which is incredible. She writes (of Leila):

She has two children to support. I went into her daily life and I found a strong woman, careful with her context, stubborn, generous and in fact, quite romantic.
I also witnessed her loneliness and frustration. I was wondering how she feels every time she gets undressed in front of a stranger, and what she dreams of, when I hear her humming a romantic melody.

Photo: An inflatable doll, forgotten on the seat of the limo. By Myriam Melona via The NY Times.

Found in an Argentine Limousine

The NY Times Lens Blog features a series by Myriam Meloni, an Italian photographer, who, while recovering from an injury in Argentina, began spending a lot of time in taxis to attend physical therapy sessions. Over the course of things, she learned that her cabby also drove limos, and had interesting stories about what went on in them. So she chose a uniform angle and “transformed the limo’s back seat into a shoe-box theater, with her as an audience of one, witnessing a parade of scenes.” See the photos here.

One of the people she encountered was Leila, a 23-year-old woman working as a stripper, who—to Meloni’s shock—had sex with four men in the car.

Lens Blog:

“But what impressed me is that I saw the girl manage the situation so easily,” said Ms. Meloni, adding that, through it all, she thought the woman projected poise. But when the four men left and the vehicle drove along, she saw a complete change in the woman (Slide 6). And when the veneer of a passenger’s constructed image was pierced, the contrast with reality could be startling.

“When I saw her totally alone, when I started to see her face, how she looked, how young she was and I took this portrait, I had a special feeling with this woman,” Ms. Meloni said. “Her attitude was totally different. She was just acting.”

She later photographed and wrote about Leila’s life in the essay Important Things Are Said Softly, which is incredible. She writes (of Leila):

She has two children to support. I went into her daily life and I found a strong woman, careful with her context, stubborn, generous and in fact, quite romantic.

I also witnessed her loneliness and frustration. I was wondering how she feels every time she gets undressed in front of a stranger, and what she dreams of, when I hear her humming a romantic melody.

Photo: An inflatable doll, forgotten on the seat of the limo. By Myriam Melona via The NY Times.

But the most important question for this “family album” will be to what extent we can enlarge our notion of family. If viewed as happening to the “other,” then much of this imagery—whether joyous or painful—will be ignored by those not directly affected. If, on the other hand, we see ourselves as mutually dependent, both happy for each other’s successes and attentive to each other’s welfare, then even the harshest imagery created by communities of their own distress can serve a purpose.

Fred Ritchin, professor at NYU and co-director of the Photography & Human Rights Program at Tisch in an article for TIME LightBox on Hurricane Sandy, One Year Later.

He discusses the growing practice of and potential for communities to portray themselves through photography, be it professionals having access to a larger audience through the web, or amateurs using their mobile phones to capture events.

Instagram, for example, allows professionals and amateurs alike to immediately upload images; during Hurricane Sandy last year, ten photos tagged to the storm were uploaded every second; 800,000 pictures were uploaded in all. In contrast, the monumental, multi-year Farm Security Administration program created during the New Deal that focused on American rural poverty with photographers such as Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Russell Lee, Gordon Parks, Arthur Rothstein and Ben Shahn, produced roughly 250,000 images total.

While Instagram as a photographic and journalistic medium has its critics, one of its positive features is the fact that users can see only one photo at a time on their phone, which, Ritchin points out, provides the viewer a type of respite from the visual chaos of the web. At a time when increasing numbers of citizens around the world are documenting everything from war to human rights atrocities to their daily lives, a coherent way to filter this imagery is missing. Not all disasters are the same, he writes:

Whereas Hurricane Sandy was a catastrophe that those in the Northeastern United States suffered through together, sharing each other’s vulnerability, other circumstances may be more problematic. What might have been the result if those trapped inside the World Trade Towers on September 11 had possessed cellphone cameras? Would it have been enlightening for others on the outside if they were able to distribute images of their terrible predicament, or would large amounts of such first-person imagery have provoked an ugly voyeurism amounting to re-victimization? Would these images have further increased the trauma for a horrified, largely powerless public to even more intolerable levels, and with it the calls for vengeance?

Our task is two-fold: 1) “to develop practical applications for this abundance of imagery” and 2) to find ways to make this “family album” that stretches the world over accessible to us, in our media consumption cycles as something other than an overload of imagery lest it cause “an even greater distancing from events” due to our inability to process the abundance. 

All that in mind, view the photo essay "Hurricane Sandy, One Year Later: Self-Portraits of Communities in Distress" here.