Posts tagged photography

Found in an Argentine Limousine
The NY Times Lens Blog features a series by Myriam Meloni, an Italian photographer, who, while recovering from an injury in Argentina, began spending a lot of time in taxis to attend physical therapy sessions. Over the course of things, she learned that her cabby also drove limos, and had interesting stories about what went on in them. So she chose a uniform angle and “transformed the limo’s back seat into a shoe-box theater, with her as an audience of one, witnessing a parade of scenes.” See the photos here.
One of the people she encountered was Leila, a 23-year-old woman working as a stripper, who—to Meloni’s shock—had sex with four men in the car.
Lens Blog:

“But what impressed me is that I saw the girl manage the situation so easily,” said Ms. Meloni, adding that, through it all, she thought the woman projected poise. But when the four men left and the vehicle drove along, she saw a complete change in the woman (Slide 6). And when the veneer of a passenger’s constructed image was pierced, the contrast with reality could be startling.
“When I saw her totally alone, when I started to see her face, how she looked, how young she was and I took this portrait, I had a special feeling with this woman,” Ms. Meloni said. “Her attitude was totally different. She was just acting.”

She later photographed and wrote about Leila’s life in the essay Important Things Are Said Softly, which is incredible. She writes (of Leila):

She has two children to support. I went into her daily life and I found a strong woman, careful with her context, stubborn, generous and in fact, quite romantic.
I also witnessed her loneliness and frustration. I was wondering how she feels every time she gets undressed in front of a stranger, and what she dreams of, when I hear her humming a romantic melody.

Photo: An inflatable doll, forgotten on the seat of the limo. By Myriam Melona via The NY Times.

Found in an Argentine Limousine

The NY Times Lens Blog features a series by Myriam Meloni, an Italian photographer, who, while recovering from an injury in Argentina, began spending a lot of time in taxis to attend physical therapy sessions. Over the course of things, she learned that her cabby also drove limos, and had interesting stories about what went on in them. So she chose a uniform angle and “transformed the limo’s back seat into a shoe-box theater, with her as an audience of one, witnessing a parade of scenes.” See the photos here.

One of the people she encountered was Leila, a 23-year-old woman working as a stripper, who—to Meloni’s shock—had sex with four men in the car.

Lens Blog:

“But what impressed me is that I saw the girl manage the situation so easily,” said Ms. Meloni, adding that, through it all, she thought the woman projected poise. But when the four men left and the vehicle drove along, she saw a complete change in the woman (Slide 6). And when the veneer of a passenger’s constructed image was pierced, the contrast with reality could be startling.

“When I saw her totally alone, when I started to see her face, how she looked, how young she was and I took this portrait, I had a special feeling with this woman,” Ms. Meloni said. “Her attitude was totally different. She was just acting.”

She later photographed and wrote about Leila’s life in the essay Important Things Are Said Softly, which is incredible. She writes (of Leila):

She has two children to support. I went into her daily life and I found a strong woman, careful with her context, stubborn, generous and in fact, quite romantic.

I also witnessed her loneliness and frustration. I was wondering how she feels every time she gets undressed in front of a stranger, and what she dreams of, when I hear her humming a romantic melody.

Photo: An inflatable doll, forgotten on the seat of the limo. By Myriam Melona via The NY Times.

But the most important question for this “family album” will be to what extent we can enlarge our notion of family. If viewed as happening to the “other,” then much of this imagery—whether joyous or painful—will be ignored by those not directly affected. If, on the other hand, we see ourselves as mutually dependent, both happy for each other’s successes and attentive to each other’s welfare, then even the harshest imagery created by communities of their own distress can serve a purpose.

Fred Ritchin, professor at NYU and co-director of the Photography & Human Rights Program at Tisch in an article for TIME LightBox on Hurricane Sandy, One Year Later.

He discusses the growing practice of and potential for communities to portray themselves through photography, be it professionals having access to a larger audience through the web, or amateurs using their mobile phones to capture events.

Instagram, for example, allows professionals and amateurs alike to immediately upload images; during Hurricane Sandy last year, ten photos tagged to the storm were uploaded every second; 800,000 pictures were uploaded in all. In contrast, the monumental, multi-year Farm Security Administration program created during the New Deal that focused on American rural poverty with photographers such as Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Russell Lee, Gordon Parks, Arthur Rothstein and Ben Shahn, produced roughly 250,000 images total.

While Instagram as a photographic and journalistic medium has its critics, one of its positive features is the fact that users can see only one photo at a time on their phone, which, Ritchin points out, provides the viewer a type of respite from the visual chaos of the web. At a time when increasing numbers of citizens around the world are documenting everything from war to human rights atrocities to their daily lives, a coherent way to filter this imagery is missing. Not all disasters are the same, he writes:

Whereas Hurricane Sandy was a catastrophe that those in the Northeastern United States suffered through together, sharing each other’s vulnerability, other circumstances may be more problematic. What might have been the result if those trapped inside the World Trade Towers on September 11 had possessed cellphone cameras? Would it have been enlightening for others on the outside if they were able to distribute images of their terrible predicament, or would large amounts of such first-person imagery have provoked an ugly voyeurism amounting to re-victimization? Would these images have further increased the trauma for a horrified, largely powerless public to even more intolerable levels, and with it the calls for vengeance?

Our task is two-fold: 1) “to develop practical applications for this abundance of imagery” and 2) to find ways to make this “family album” that stretches the world over accessible to us, in our media consumption cycles as something other than an overload of imagery lest it cause “an even greater distancing from events” due to our inability to process the abundance. 

All that in mind, view the photo essay "Hurricane Sandy, One Year Later: Self-Portraits of Communities in Distress" here.

You can sense when somebody wants something. It’s all about energy exchange, it’s not about words. That’s what I learned from doing Humans of New York. Somebody’s willingness to let me photograph them, and willingness to tell me a story, has nothing to do with the words I say. It all has to do with the energy I’m giving off, which hopefully is very genuine, very interested energy. It’s It’s just two people having a conversation in the street. I think that’s where genuine content comes from.

Brandon Stanton, the human behind Humans of New York, as quoted in this Mashable profile about his work and his forthcoming book.

Brandon began the project in the summer of 2010 in an effort “to construct a photographic census of New York City”. Originally, the idea was to plot the photos on map, but after speaking with 10,000 strangers (New Yorkers and visitors to NYC), he decided to turn the project into a blog which features a portrait of each person, accompanied with a quote or short story from them. Humans of New york has nearly 1.5 million Facebook fans, over 33,000 Twitter followers and Tumblr posts with notes in the thousands. 

Welcome to the Morgue

A few floors under Times Square is the “Morgue,” a New York Times archive repository of clippings and photographs dating back to the 1870s.

The archive holds 6-8 million physical photos, according to Jeff Roth, the morgue’s manager, about 98% of which have never been digitized.

"It’s an incredible collection of forgotten history," says the documentary filmmaker Katerina Cizek in the video above. Cizek spent a week in the morgue to gather materials for HIGHRISE, an interactive series created by The New York Times’s Op-Docs department and the National Film Board of Canada that explores the history of vertical living.

Haven’t seen it? We recommend you start exploring it now. Want more information about the multi-year series? Visit the NFB.

fotojournalismus:

Pro-military crowds and supporters of the former president, Mohammed Morsi, pelt each other with rocks, fireworks and firebombs in street battles near Ramsis Square, Cairo, Egypt on Oct. 6, 2013.
[Credit : Emad Abdul Rahman/AP]

fotojournalismus:

Pro-military crowds and supporters of the former president, Mohammed Morsi, pelt each other with rocks, fireworks and firebombs in street battles near Ramsis Square, Cairo, Egypt on Oct. 6, 2013.

[Credit : Emad Abdul Rahman/AP]

Brooklyn-based Pop Up Photo Exhibit Shows a Year in the Life of a NY Times Photographer
Lens Blog:

What’s contained in a year? For Tyler Hicks, a staff photographer for The New York Times, it’s trips to places like Gaza or Syria and photographing the longstanding yet reliably devastating conflicts there. Or to the Gulf of Oman, where the aircraft carrier he was on, covering a different story with C. J. Chivers, changed course suddenly to pursue and capture Somali pirates.
Or to the Congolese jungles in Central Africa, chasing a story on poaching, which meant chasing poachers and their prey.
“I’m used to having stuff happen in front of me,” said Mr. Hicks, 44, jet-lagged from his recent wedding in Massachusetts — did we mention he just got married? — to his home in Nairobi, Kenya. “This was different for me, because for the most part, I was photographing animals.”

The subject, he added, “is elusive, you have to really chase it — it’s actually trying to get away from you.”

His work will be exhibited at Photoville, a Brooklyn-based pop up photo destination built from freight containers. The village will include exhibitions, lectures, hands-on workshops, night-time projections and a beer and food garden. It’s open from September 19 through September 29. Details here.
Image: A photo by Tyler Hicks via NY Times Lens Blog. According to the caption, one of the worst massacres for elephants anywhere in the world has been in Sakouma National Park in Chad, where the elephant population has been reduced by 90% in 10 years. See the full set here. Some photos are horrifying.

Brooklyn-based Pop Up Photo Exhibit Shows a Year in the Life of a NY Times Photographer

Lens Blog:

What’s contained in a year? For Tyler Hicks, a staff photographer for The New York Times, it’s trips to places like Gaza or Syria and photographing the longstanding yet reliably devastating conflicts there. Or to the Gulf of Oman, where the aircraft carrier he was on, covering a different story with C. J. Chivers, changed course suddenly to pursue and capture Somali pirates.

Or to the Congolese jungles in Central Africa, chasing a story on poaching, which meant chasing poachers and their prey.

“I’m used to having stuff happen in front of me,” said Mr. Hicks, 44, jet-lagged from his recent wedding in Massachusetts — did we mention he just got married? — to his home in Nairobi, Kenya. “This was different for me, because for the most part, I was photographing animals.”

The subject, he added, “is elusive, you have to really chase it — it’s actually trying to get away from you.”

His work will be exhibited at Photoville, a Brooklyn-based pop up photo destination built from freight containers. The village will include exhibitions, lectures, hands-on workshops, night-time projections and a beer and food garden. It’s open from September 19 through September 29. Details here.

Image: A photo by Tyler Hicks via NY Times Lens Blog. According to the caption, one of the worst massacres for elephants anywhere in the world has been in Sakouma National Park in Chad, where the elephant population has been reduced by 90% in 10 years. See the full set here. Some photos are horrifying.

At the moment of execution the rebels grasped his throat. The young man put up a struggle. Three or four rebels pinned him down. The man tried to protect his throat with his hands, which were still tied together. He tried to resist but they were stronger than he was and they cut his throat. They raised his head into the air. People waved their guns and cheered. Everyone was happy that the execution had gone ahead.

That scene in Syria, that moment, was like a scene from the Middle Ages, the kind of thing you read about in history books. The war in Syria has reached the point where a person can be mercilessly killed in front of hundreds of people—who enjoy the spectacle.

As a human being I would never have wished to see what I saw. But as a journalist I have a camera and a responsibility. I have a responsibility to share what I saw that day. That’s why I am making this statement and that’s why I took the photographs. I will close this chapter soon and try never to remember it.

TIME Lightbox, Witness to a Syrian Execution: “I Saw a Scene of Utter Cruelty”.

Via TIME:

The perpetrators of atrocities themselves often use digital cameras or smartphones to photograph or film their acts of torture and murder, uploading the images to the Internet. These images and videos are used for propaganda, and their authenticity is often impossible to verify. It is very rare that a group of fighters from either side gives a professional photojournalist from a country outside Syria full and unfettered access to chronicle an atrocity as it unfolds. The images above are products of that access.

The photographer in the piece goes unnamed in order to protect him from repercussions when he returns to Syria. He reports that this was the fourth execution he had seen that day.

The Women of the Afghanistan War
The Atlantic’s In Focus blog has a moving photo gallery depicting women from various aspects of the nearly 12-year-old war. This includes NATO soldiers along with Afghan artists, soldiers, prisoners and rappers among many others.
Image: Via The Atlantic — “An Afghan widow takes part in a demonstration at a CARE International food distribution center in Kabul, on March 6, 2006. Hundreds of widows staged a protest as they urged CARE to continue food distribution. (Reuters/Ahmad Masood)” Select to embiggen. 

The Women of the Afghanistan War

The Atlantic’s In Focus blog has a moving photo gallery depicting women from various aspects of the nearly 12-year-old war. This includes NATO soldiers along with Afghan artists, soldiers, prisoners and rappers among many others.

Image: Via The Atlantic — “An Afghan widow takes part in a demonstration at a CARE International food distribution center in Kabul, on March 6, 2006. Hundreds of widows staged a protest as they urged CARE to continue food distribution. (Reuters/Ahmad Masood)” Select to embiggen. 

I wonder if I need to tell them about how I once woke up in my hotel room and found the bellboy standing over my bed. I wonder if I need to recount that while crouching on the ground during a festival, I didn’t realise I had been surrounded by a group of drunken boys and had to crawl through their legs before the leering, lewd gesticulating and touching turned into something uglier. I wonder if I need to talk about the things I never talk about, like fear, because I have been lucky enough to come out safely.

I think it is time not to be ashamed to talk about fear. Fear is what ensures I look back as I walk, it’s what makes me look for exits when I enter potentially difficult spaces, it is what keeps me alert and often, alive. I call it other things like discomfort or commonsense, because it’s weak to be afraid — it might expose me for what I am, a woman.

Ashima Narain, Fear in the Frame, Indian Express.

Narain is a photo editor at National Geographic Traveller India and her piece is an honest, heartfelt call to action to create measures of protection and support for photographers and journalists, particularly women.

For context, see this recent NY Times piece—Why Female Journalists in India Still Can’t Have It All—in which her story is highlighted along with accounts from other female journalists in India, many of whom do not report harassment they experience on the job because if they do, they risk losing the opportunity and freedom to report. It’s a disheartening catch-22 and definitely something to be aware of.

Narain continues:

As press, we are expected to take calculated risks. That is the job, but what do our employers do to protect us? When we join, do they give us any safety guidelines while travelling around the city or the country on an assignment? Do interns receive consistent mentorship on safety in the field? Do the people controlling the purse strings know what it means to be on the ground, or what it means to be gender sensitive?

These questions are in no way about this particular, heinous incident, but ones that I feel need to be addressed based on experiences that I, and many of my peers, have had. They are questions that have been highlighted by this tragedy, and are for media organisations across the board. But we don’t have to stop at the media. Why don’t we make it an institutional obligation for all employers to ensure that, every few months, all their staff has to attend safety seminars?

I couldn’t sleep the night I heard about this incident. For 13 years I have psychologically converted my camera into my protective shield — one that I felt would keep me from harm as it showed that I have the means to retaliate. My shield has been shattered. I do feel scared. I think we all should. But this fear should not paralyse us, nor stop us from doing our work — but channel it so we can do our work better.

Over the past few days, several journalists and photographers have been talking about creating a voluntary mentoring programme for interns, or young people who work in the media and want guidance. Until then, if there are photographers who feel they need to talk, you can look me up. I am easy to find.

Egypt
Yesterday: 34 ‘Islamists’ killed while in custody.
Today: 24 police killed in an ambush on their bus in Sinai.
Image: A Mohammed Morsi supporter injured when police broke up a sit-in lays on the ground near Cairo University, August 14, Hussein Tallal/AP via Boston.com.

Egypt

Yesterday: 34 ‘Islamists’ killed while in custody.

Today: 24 police killed in an ambush on their bus in Sinai.

Image: A Mohammed Morsi supporter injured when police broke up a sit-in lays on the ground near Cairo University, August 14, Hussein Tallal/AP via Boston.com.

PRESS: IN THE FLESH

maxwellcollins:

Here are some images from my recent series featuring portraits of employees from The Buffalo News printed on top of collages of newspaper.  

Statement

'Press: In the Flesh' is portrait series featuring photographs of all the different characters involved in the 24-hour business of print journalism including all the editors, writers and photographers that make a daily newspaper possible. 

What makes this body of work unique is that the subjects are printed directly on top of the newspaper they contribute to, adding another dimension to the image that not only speaks to the individual, but infuses them with the product they work so hard to produce. 

As we embark deeper into the digital age, the security of the printed word continues to waiver, which will allow these portraits to act as an artifact in the future of how newspapers were once produced.

FJP: Thanks for sharing, Max. It’s fantastic.

Just Another 600,000-Pixel-Wide, Panoramic, Zoomable Photo of Tokyo
Via io9

It took photographer Jeffrey Martin two days of shooting and four months of editing to create the interactive panorama you’re about to experience. At 600,000 pixels wide, it would measure 50 meters by 100 meters if printed at photographic resolution.

Via 360Cities:

Tokyo Towers is the second-largest image I’ve ever made. That’s 600,000 pixels wide. Just a reminder that your mobile phone shoots photos around 3000 pixels wide. The largest possible size of an image in Photoshop is 300,000 pixels. So, this image was very difficult to assemble into a single seamless image. In fact, it has never existed as a single image file. To view it on the web, the image is cut into more than a million little “tiles” which are loaded as needed depending on your view (similar to google maps, for example).

You can check it out and zoom about at 360Gigapixels.
Image: Zoomed out view of Tokyo Towers, by Jeffrey Martin. Select to embiggen.

Just Another 600,000-Pixel-Wide, Panoramic, Zoomable Photo of Tokyo

Via io9

It took photographer Jeffrey Martin two days of shooting and four months of editing to create the interactive panorama you’re about to experience. At 600,000 pixels wide, it would measure 50 meters by 100 meters if printed at photographic resolution.

Via 360Cities:

Tokyo Towers is the second-largest image I’ve ever made. That’s 600,000 pixels wide. Just a reminder that your mobile phone shoots photos around 3000 pixels wide. The largest possible size of an image in Photoshop is 300,000 pixels. So, this image was very difficult to assemble into a single seamless image. In fact, it has never existed as a single image file. To view it on the web, the image is cut into more than a million little “tiles” which are loaded as needed depending on your view (similar to google maps, for example).

You can check it out and zoom about at 360Gigapixels.

Image: Zoomed out view of Tokyo Towers, by Jeffrey Martin. Select to embiggen.

Among the core concepts of Buddhism is the idea of understanding your individual experience of living and the way that you are connected to other people. As a photographer, you observe your subject, try to become connected and then capture that in a single moment.

David Butow, as quoted in Photographing the Part of Buddhism that Can’t Be Seen. New York Times Lens Blog.

When David Butow decided to spend 2012 traveling the world to photograph Buddhism, he knew there would be a rich abundance of visual material: colorful clothing, vibrant decorations and precisely choreographed rituals.

But the challenge of capturing the essence of spiritual experience became apparent to him quickly. While sacred rites are visually lush, and obvious, spiritual experience is interior and hidden — and it is difficult to photograph something that is not visible.

Mr. Butow used a variety of strategies — and camera formats — to try to capture the heart of Buddhism. He layered reflections, employed camera motion and made metaphoric images that suggested stillness. He included double exposures, used diptychs and even physically altered negatives with a small blade.

His journey last year, as he worked on “Seeing Buddha: A Photographic Journey,” spanned 10 countries including Bhutan, Cambodia, Japan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and the Tibetan exile community in Dharamsala, India. Along the way, he discovered that Buddhism and photography have much in common, including observation, empathy and being fully in the moment.

FJP: It’s an awesome set of photos and an awesome project. Check it out.

Behind the Scenes of the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Arrest
A Massachusetts police photographer upset with the glamorization of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover of the current edition of Rolling Stone released behind the scenes images of the Boston Marathon bombing investigation and arrest of the suspect.
In a statement to Boston Magazine, Sgt. Sean Murphy, a tactical photographer with the Massachusetts State Police, wrote:

Photography is very simple, it’s very basic. It brings us back to the cave. An image like this on the cover of Rolling Stone, we see it instantly as being wrong. What Rolling Stone did was wrong. This guy is evil. This is the real Boston bomber. Not someone fluffed and buffed for the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.

According to the BBC, the photo release was unauthorized and Murphy is currently under investigation. John Wolfson, the author of the Boston Magazine article that displays the photos, tweeted that Murphy has been “relieved of duty.”
Image: A sniper trains his gun on Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. One of a series of photographs released by Sean Murphy to Boston Magazine. Select to embiggen.

Behind the Scenes of the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Arrest

A Massachusetts police photographer upset with the glamorization of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover of the current edition of Rolling Stone released behind the scenes images of the Boston Marathon bombing investigation and arrest of the suspect.

In a statement to Boston Magazine, Sgt. Sean Murphy, a tactical photographer with the Massachusetts State Police, wrote:

Photography is very simple, it’s very basic. It brings us back to the cave. An image like this on the cover of Rolling Stone, we see it instantly as being wrong. What Rolling Stone did was wrong. This guy is evil. This is the real Boston bomber. Not someone fluffed and buffed for the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.

According to the BBC, the photo release was unauthorized and Murphy is currently under investigation. John Wolfson, the author of the Boston Magazine article that displays the photos, tweeted that Murphy has been “relieved of duty.”

Image: A sniper trains his gun on Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. One of a series of photographs released by Sean Murphy to Boston Magazine. Select to embiggen.