Posts tagged photoshop

Funny Social Media Accounts

Behold! An FJP round up of five hilarious social media accounts that are worth a gander:

1. The new YouTube channel, FaceMashups, digitally merges celebrity bodies, faces, and voices together to create bizarre interview segments.

2. Photographer, Flora Borsi, photoshops herself into old photographs to make it look like she’s taking pictures of past events with her cell phone. View the Facebook album here.

3. Twitter user, @YouSoPretentious, takes pictures of handwritten notes that make fun of typical social media photos and posts them to the Instagram account, Satiregram. The notes say things like, “An attempt at being artsy by taking short clips of nature and the sky. How nice,” “A BLT from a local diner,” and “Oh, look. Another picture of a cat.” 

4. The Twitter account, @FakeAPStyleBook posts ridiculous tips for “proper writing,” and pokes fun at AP Style with tweets like “Today we will be publishing a list of words you should no longer use in any publication. Adjust style books accordingly.”

5. YouTuber, Dom Mazzetti, hosts BroScienceLife, a channel featuring what he calls “Bro Science,” — ”lifting advice from an unqualified bro who looks like he works out.” Each week Mazzetti plays the role of a bro (a male who typically loves to party and talk about going to the gym) and chooses a new “bro-topic” to make fun of. 

Video: Will Ferrell & Natalie Portman’s FaceMashUp

Castro, Batman, and Superheroes Throughout History
From Slate:

Harahap’s Photoshopped “Superhistory” presents the past as if it were a comic book, seamlessly integrating pop culture icons into the photographs that build our collective memory.

Castro, Batman, and Superheroes Throughout History

From Slate:

Harahap’s Photoshopped “Superhistory” presents the past as if it were a comic book, seamlessly integrating pop culture icons into the photographs that build our collective memory.

How Much is Too Much

For its upcoming issue, Glamour surveyed readers on their thoughts about the digital manipulation of models (and celebrities) that appear in fashion magazine.

Cindi Leive, Glamour Editor-in-Chief, notes that with 70 iPhone apps on the market that let us “retouch” ourselves, more and more of us are more and more comfortable with a bit of digital nip and tuck.

But, she writes, there are limits and Glamour plans “to take a stronger role in setting ours.”

We’ll see.

Via Salon:

Retouching is like tequila. Sure, a little makes everybody look better. But go too far and you feel like puking. For years now, the media has struggled with how best to strike that pleasantly Cuervo-goggled balance, swinging wildly between science fiction-level Photoshopping and the self-congratulatorily unaltered. But as excessively sweetened-up images have come under increasing scrutiny – and been flat-out banned in extreme cases — the industry is beginning to take its cue from the unlikeliest of sources: its audience. This week, Glamour magazine revealed what happened when it asked its readers “How much is too much?” retouching. And the over 1,000 reader responses paint an intriguing picture of how deep we’re willing to go into the land of altered images.

Glamour’s take on its survey is here.

photojojo:

We’ve heard of Photoshop by Adobe, but have you heard of Fotoshop by Adobé?

It’ll make your skin sparkle.

Fotoshop by Adobé WILL Make You Perfect

FJP: Win!

Photoshop Forensics
The New York Times has an interesting write-up on photo forensics software created by Dartmouth professor Hany Farid.
The software reverse engineers photographs to show what they originally looked like in order to demonstrate what manipulation was applied to them.
Via the New York Times:

Dr. Farid and Eric Kee, a Ph.D. student in computer science at Dartmouth, are proposing a software tool for measuring how much fashion and beauty photos have been altered, a 1-to-5 scale that distinguishes the infinitesimal from the fantastic. Their research is being published this week in a scholarly journal, The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Their work is intended as a technological step to address concerns about the prevalence of highly idealized and digitally edited images in advertising and fashion magazines. Such images, research suggests, contribute to eating disorders and anxiety about body types, especially among young women.

The United States and various Europe countries have organizations proposing legislation that manipulated photographs come with a label that informs viewers just how much a photograph has been doctored.
For example, a proposed “Self-Esteem Act" in the United States states, "We’re asking for support to pass federal legislation requiring advertising and editorial that’s meaningfully changed the human form through photoshopping or airbrushing to carry "Truth in Advertising" labels. The labels will simply state that the models shown have been altered. No judgments, no morality, just transparency and clarity."
In June, the American Medical Association adopted a policy to discourage advertisers from altering “photographs in a manner that could promote unrealistic expectations of appropriate body image.”
Image: Before and After Photographs from Hany Farid’s work. Via the Dartmouth Computer Science Department.

Photoshop Forensics

The New York Times has an interesting write-up on photo forensics software created by Dartmouth professor Hany Farid.

The software reverse engineers photographs to show what they originally looked like in order to demonstrate what manipulation was applied to them.

Via the New York Times:

Dr. Farid and Eric Kee, a Ph.D. student in computer science at Dartmouth, are proposing a software tool for measuring how much fashion and beauty photos have been altered, a 1-to-5 scale that distinguishes the infinitesimal from the fantastic. Their research is being published this week in a scholarly journal, The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Their work is intended as a technological step to address concerns about the prevalence of highly idealized and digitally edited images in advertising and fashion magazines. Such images, research suggests, contribute to eating disorders and anxiety about body types, especially among young women.

The United States and various Europe countries have organizations proposing legislation that manipulated photographs come with a label that informs viewers just how much a photograph has been doctored.

For example, a proposed “Self-Esteem Act" in the United States states, "We’re asking for support to pass federal legislation requiring advertising and editorial that’s meaningfully changed the human form through photoshopping or airbrushing to carry "Truth in Advertising" labels. The labels will simply state that the models shown have been altered. No judgments, no morality, just transparency and clarity."

In June, the American Medical Association adopted a policy to discourage advertisers from altering “photographs in a manner that could promote unrealistic expectations of appropriate body image.”

Image: Before and After Photographs from Hany Farid’s work. Via the Dartmouth Computer Science Department.

Photoshop Ninja
Via Viget Inspire.

Photoshop Ninja

Via Viget Inspire.

The Man Who Got Us to 'Like' Everything

The Wall Street Journal’s Geoffrey A. Fowler profiles Soleio Cuervo, Facebook’s product designer:

"We have a saying at Facebook: Photoshop lies," said Mr. Cuervo. Instead of relying on mockups filled with pretty fake text, Facebook designers create Web-browser-ready versions of their designs that can be filled with real user content, which tends to look very different from what designers might want ideally. "On Photoshop, it is very easy for me to fabricate an imaginary world where users type in very poignant statements, but that is not how people will populate the system," he said.

Geoffrey A. Fowler, The Wall Street Journal. The Man Who Got Us to ‘Like’ Everything.

H/T: Zach Seward.

Editing Photoshopping Playboy
Via Jezebel:

It’s “The Year Of The Rabbit” at Christie’s, which has put up for auction an array of Playboy memorabilia. The most interesting are the copies of Playboy centerfolds from the 1990s and early 2000s that are marked up by editors and the art department — and subjected to a panel that grades them with a composite score.

Jezebel has a NSFW gallery of marked-up photos.
What’s the over/under that they’re as meticulous with their editorial as their pictorial?

Editing Photoshopping Playboy

Via Jezebel:

It’s “The Year Of The Rabbit” at Christie’s, which has put up for auction an array of Playboy memorabilia. The most interesting are the copies of Playboy centerfolds from the 1990s and early 2000s that are marked up by editors and the art department — and subjected to a panel that grades them with a composite score.

Jezebel has a NSFW gallery of marked-up photos.

What’s the over/under that they’re as meticulous with their editorial as their pictorial?