posts about or somewhat related to ‘piracy’

Netflix Uses Piracy Data to Select Its Programs
Netflix chooses its programming based on what shows and movies are popular on piracy sites, Netflix’s Vice President of Content Acquisition, Kelly Merryman, told Tweakers. Netflix looks at what people are downloading and then buys the rights to the titles in highest demand.
According to TorrentFreak, Netflix CEO, Reed Hastings, suggests that offering people what they want will sway them to use Netflix instead of BitTorrent as their source of entertainment. The idea may not be far-fetched, since BitTorrent traffic in Canada dropped 50% after Netflix appeared three years ago. 
Via TorrentFreak:

“Netflix is so much easier than torrenting. You don’t have to deal with files, you don’t have to download them and move them around. You just click and watch,” Hastings says.

Image: BoingBoing

Netflix Uses Piracy Data to Select Its Programs

Netflix chooses its programming based on what shows and movies are popular on piracy sites, Netflix’s Vice President of Content Acquisition, Kelly Merryman, told Tweakers. Netflix looks at what people are downloading and then buys the rights to the titles in highest demand.

According to TorrentFreak, Netflix CEO, Reed Hastings, suggests that offering people what they want will sway them to use Netflix instead of BitTorrent as their source of entertainment. The idea may not be far-fetched, since BitTorrent traffic in Canada dropped 50% after Netflix appeared three years ago. 

Via TorrentFreak:

“Netflix is so much easier than torrenting. You don’t have to deal with files, you don’t have to download them and move them around. You just click and watch,” Hastings says.

Image: BoingBoing

Just like I told a French journalist and to the lady at the Washington Post, pirates are thieves and they do steal. Yeah yeah, “when I steal your DVD, you have no DVD, but when I copy a file, you still have a file” – I get that BS. We all know that it’s BS too. However, SOPAs and PIPAs create tyranny. If given the choice between thieves and tyranny, I’d rather stay with the thieves.

Suren Ter, creator of YouHaveDownloaded.com to Privacy Online News.

You Have Downloaded indexes IP addresses that have been used to download torrent files. If you visit the site, it will display what files have been downloaded on your network. 

The site, says Ter, is a proof of concept to show visitors what the entertainment industry might see as it tracks downloads across peer-to-peer networks.

H/T: Slashdot.



Frederic Filloux says Piracy is a big part of the digital ecosystem, and its role is both revered and ridiculed:
 

In October 2003, Wired ran this interesting piece about a company specialized in tracking entertainment contents over the internet. BigChampagne, located in Beverly Hills, is for the digital era what Billboard magazine was in the analog world. Except that BigChampagne is essentially tracking illegal contents that circulates on the web. It does so with incredible precision by matching IP numbers and zip code, finding out what’s hot on peer-to-peer networks. In his Wired piece, Jeff Howe explains:
BigChampagne’s clients can pull up information about popularity and market share (what percentage of file-sharers have a given song). They can also drill down into specific markets - to see, for example, that 38.35 percent of file-sharers in Omaha, Nebraska, have a song from the new 50 Cent album.
No wonder some clients pay BigChampagne up to $40,000 a month for such data. They  use BigChampagne’s valuable intelligence to apply gentle pressure on local radio station to air the very tunes favored by downloaders. For a long time, illegal file-sharing has been a powerful market and promotional tool for the music industry.

Piracy is still a problem, especially for software giants like Microsoft. Filloux points out that in China, so rampant is the problem of digital piracy for the company, that Microsoft sales are the same there as in the Netherlands, a country with just 16 million people—many of whom must be paying full fare for computer programs.

Frederic Filloux says Piracy is a big part of the digital ecosystem, and its role is both revered and ridiculed:

 

In October 2003, Wired ran this interesting piece about a company specialized in tracking entertainment contents over the internet. BigChampagne, located in Beverly Hills, is for the digital era what Billboard magazine was in the analog world. Except that BigChampagne is essentially tracking illegal contents that circulates on the web. It does so with incredible precision by matching IP numbers and zip code, finding out what’s hot on peer-to-peer networks. In his Wired piece, Jeff Howe explains:

BigChampagne’s clients can pull up information about popularity and market share (what percentage of file-sharers have a given song). They can also drill down into specific markets - to see, for example, that 38.35 percent of file-sharers in Omaha, Nebraska, have a song from the new 50 Cent album.

No wonder some clients pay BigChampagne up to $40,000 a month for such data. They  use BigChampagne’s valuable intelligence to apply gentle pressure on local radio station to air the very tunes favored by downloaders. For a long time, illegal file-sharing has been a powerful market and promotional tool for the music industry.

Piracy is still a problem, especially for software giants like Microsoft. Filloux points out that in China, so rampant is the problem of digital piracy for the company, that Microsoft sales are the same there as in the Netherlands, a country with just 16 million people—many of whom must be paying full fare for computer programs.

As we go deeper into an information age, I think that we need to have serious conversations about what is colloquially termed piracy. We need to distinguish media piracy from software piracy because they’re not the same thing. We need to seriously interrogate fairness and equality, creative production and cultural engagement. And we need to seriously take into consideration why people do what they do. I strongly believe that when people work en masse to route around a system, the system is most likely the thing that needs the fixing, not the people.

Even Big Media Companies Do It

Via TorrentFeak:

With increasing lobbying efforts from the entertainment industry against BitTorrent sites and users, we wondered whether these companies hold themselves to the same standards they demand of others. After some initial skimming we’ve discovered BitTorrent pirates at nearly every major entertainment industry company in the US, including Sony Pictures Entertainment, Fox Entertainment and NBC Universal. Busted.

A few days ago we wrote about a new website that exposes what people behind an IP-address have downloaded on BitTorrent. The Russian-based founders of the site developed the service so people can show their friends how public their downloading habits are, and that is exactly what we’re going to do today.

Armed with the IP-ranges of major Hollywood studios we decided to find out what they’ve been downloading. As expected, it didn’t take us long before we found BitTorrent ‘pirates’ at several leading entertainment industry companies. Yes, these are the same companies who want to disconnect people from the Internet after they’ve been caught sharing copyrighted material.

Do as I say, not as I do?

Images: Screenshots of content downloaded from Fox, Universal and Sony’s respective IP addresses.

Piracy is almost always a service problem and not a pricing problem. For example, if a pirate offers a product anywhere in the world, 24/7, purchasable from the convenience of your personal computer, and the legal provider says the product is region-locked, will come to your country three months after the U.S. release and can only be purchased at a brick and mortar store, then the pirate’s service is more valuable.

Most DRM solutions diminish the value of the product by either directly restricting a customer’s use or by creating uncertainty.

Our goal is to create greater service value than pirates, and this has been successful enough for us that piracy is basically a non-issue for our company. For example, prior to entering the Russian market, we were told that Russia was a waste of time because everyone would pirate our products. Russia is now about to become our largest market in Europe.

— Gabe Newell, CEO of Valve, a game and entertainment company (think: Half-Life and Portal), via an interview with the Cambridge Student

Explanation of the potential downside of the Stop Online Piracy Act. I’d be interested to know which Senators and / or members of Congress initiated the bill on behalf of the entertainment industry.

The House Judiciary Committee is meeting today to hear arguments on the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). 
As we wrote Monday, SOPA gives large copyright holders such as music labels and movie studios the power to take down Web sites by sending notices to Internet Service Providers and e-commerce payment processors.
Simply, the law gives copyright holder the power to determine what infringes and what doesn’t infringe without any oversite, judicial or otherwise.
You would think with such sweeping changes under consideration, the Judiciary Committee would want to hear multiple arguments and perspectives from different sides of the issue.
If only that were the case. As the Electronic Frontier Foundation reports, the deck is stacked in favor of SOPA proponents: 

What could have been an opportunity for the committee to hear from a variety of stakeholders has devolved into parade of pro-SOPA partisans. Scheduled to testify are representatives from the Register of Copyrights, Pfizer Global Security, the Motion Picture Association of America, the AFL-CIO, and Mastercard Worldwide—many of which helped to draft this legislation in the first place, and didn’t let anyone else into the room. The only scheduled witness in opposition to the bill is Katherine Oyama, policy counsel on copyright and trademark law for Google.

Image: A screen overlay provided by AmericanCensorship.org that allows Web site operators to express their opposition to SOPA. Instructions for adding it to your site are here.

The House Judiciary Committee is meeting today to hear arguments on the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). 

As we wrote Monday, SOPA gives large copyright holders such as music labels and movie studios the power to take down Web sites by sending notices to Internet Service Providers and e-commerce payment processors.

Simply, the law gives copyright holder the power to determine what infringes and what doesn’t infringe without any oversite, judicial or otherwise.

You would think with such sweeping changes under consideration, the Judiciary Committee would want to hear multiple arguments and perspectives from different sides of the issue.

If only that were the case. As the Electronic Frontier Foundation reports, the deck is stacked in favor of SOPA proponents

What could have been an opportunity for the committee to hear from a variety of stakeholders has devolved into parade of pro-SOPA partisans. Scheduled to testify are representatives from the Register of Copyrights, Pfizer Global Security, the Motion Picture Association of America, the AFL-CIO, and Mastercard Worldwide—many of which helped to draft this legislation in the first place, and didn’t let anyone else into the room. The only scheduled witness in opposition to the bill is Katherine Oyama, policy counsel on copyright and trademark law for Google.

Image: A screen overlay provided by AmericanCensorship.org that allows Web site operators to express their opposition to SOPA. Instructions for adding it to your site are here.

Google has become a global predator ruthlessly gobbling up potential rivals such as YouTube and ‘stealing’ the creative work of writers, film makers and the music industry…

…[A]ll over the world it is increasingly recognised that the search engine is like a giant vacuum cleaner parasitically sucking up content from media companies, publishers, film makers and musicians without paying anything back into the creative process that produces such high cost entertainment.
At the same time it is controlling the advertising slots on the web in its own pursuit of profit.

Alex Brummer, Daily Mail, Google threatens to destroy not only pop sensation Adele, but Britain’s film and music industries.

FJP: The man evidently fears the Interwebs.

Piracy Accounts for Nearly One Quarter of Global Internet Traffic

NBC has commissioned a new study of online piracy, demonstrating the full scope of how much copyrighted material is in circulation every day.

Of the 23.8 percent found to be copyright-infringing material, bittorrents led the way as the most plentiful source, accounting for nearly half that amount (11.4 percent). Coming in second was so-called “cyberlockers,” otherwise known as file-sharing sites like RapidShare (5.1 percent), followed by video-streaming sites i.e. Megavideo (1.4 percent) and finally, Usenet and other lesser utilized P2P sites (0.86 percent).

(Source: paidcontent.org)