Posts tagged with ‘porn’

I don’t think Hustler’s going to be around very much longer. Most people are getting their information from the Internet. It’s a technology evolution that brings a lot with it and takes a lot away.

Larry Flynt, Founder, Hustler Magazine to Bloomberg TV via Ars Technica*. “Writing is on the wall” for Hustler print mag thanks to Internet.

FJP: Sometimes we fire up the Internets to take a quick look at ‘information’. Here’s what we’ve found.

*The post has been updated to indicate that Flynt was speaking to Bloomberg TV, not Ars Technica. HT.

Why We Follow Porn

Because in the New York Times, an “adult film actor” named Stoya writes about pornography, stage names and identity:

Along with desires to differentiate themselves from performers in similar fields, increase ease of spelling and pronunciation or convey a certain image, some performers do take a stage name for the purpose of making themselves more difficult to recognize. This might possibly have worked in the ’70s, but with easy access to enormous amounts of adult content on the Internet and the ease with which we can all find juicy tidbits of information about one another’s pasts online, I can’t see it having much effect anymore…

…[But] my stage name is less about withholding parts of myself or maintaining privacy than it is a symbol of the idea that I am more than just my job or any other isolated slice of my identity.

Stoya talks about the inherent paradoxes in the pseudo-anonymity her stage name affords, but equates it with what she sees as part and parcel of a fragmentation many — notwithstanding those who disagree with the notion of digital dualism — experience between their online and offline selves.

Because in PandoDaily, we read about PornHub’s innovative marketing campaigns to get their NSFW “product” into SFW spaces.

As a result, Pornhub must rely (for now) on social advertising, digital advertising, and organic promotion, which makes them as interesting case study for other startups that, while not restricted by social mores, may have financial roadblocks in getting on TV.

The latest untraditional marketing strategy came this week when Pornhub launched a call for “Safe-For-Work” Pornhub ads. Aspiring ad men and women can submit their entries to this Tumblr (SFW). The person behind the winning entrant has a shot at becoming the company’s next creative director, the site promises.

A campaign like this not only grabs headlines (which is its own kind of free advertising). It also allows Pornhub to set the terms of its own brand identity before even launching a national campaign.

Because while reading the above we read some more and came across a study by the Urban Institute on underground economies and learn that Atlanta is the sex trade capital of the United States, a “sex act” runs anywhere from $5 to over $1000 in Dallas and pimps don’t like being called pimps. It’s too seventies. Business Manager will do.

And because so long as we’re reading about fragmentary identity, online marketing and job descriptions, we might as well read how sea slugs mate: The hermaphrodites “penis fence” in an attempt “to penis-stab the other. An inflicted wound inoculates the recipient with sperm.”

Penis stabbing? It’s not just the sea slug. Enter the bedbug, just penis stabbing its way through life:

Males will often jump on and penis-stab anything that comes their way, even females of other species, often killing them in the process — a phenomenon that has driven some species to evolve apart. Male bedbugs regularly jump other males by mistake—which is such a problem that males in one species have evolved their own damage-control spermaleges.

And that’s what we learned this week by following porn. Now off to watch Isabella Rossellini demonstrate the erotic lives of snails. Spoiler alert: “love darts.”

My colleague Alex Goldman told me he thinks of this as “a mesmerizing stock ticker of the world’s perversions.”
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What’s in a Pen?
The Wirecutter has a 6,500 word review of not only what it considers the best pen (a uni-ball Jetstream), but all sorts of facts and tidbits about pens in general.
Take a look:

There are pretty much three types of non-fountain ink pens currently on the market that you can get on the cheap: ballpoint, rollerball and gel pens. All three are closely related, but, generally speaking, each has some advantages and disadvantages over the others…
…Ballpoint technology, invented in the 1800s, is the grandaddy of all of this. It was designed to be a better and easier way of dispensing ink—embedded in the point of a pen, a rolling ball transfers the ink to the page. Ballpoints use oil-based ink solutions, which dry quickly on the page, don’t bleed through much and don’t dry out easily in the pen itself. But ballpoints tend not to be very smooth to write with.
Rollerballs use water-based ink, which provides smoother, finer lines. They are available in a wider array of colors and require less pressure to use. But their inks tend to dry slowly on the page, can easily smudge and bleed, and can dry out in the pen itself.
Gel pens are technically a rollerball variant, but use a much thicker, more viscous ink. So gel pens don’t bleed as much as most rollerballs, and you still get very smooth, fine and vivid lines. But they still generally have smudging and drying problems, and the ink runs thick; a 0.5 mm gel pen will put down a wider line than 0.5 mm in other types.

But… pens? Why not grab whatever’s available?
Because, as the review says, the “difference between an awesome pen and a mediocre one is just a couple bucks.” So, awesome. We like that.
We also like that the pens reviewed had to be less than $5.
Image: The FJP’s Jihii Jolly demonstrates her handiwork with a pen by transcribing the first of Rainer Rilke’s Duino Elegies. Via her Instagram. Select to embiggen.

What’s in a Pen?

The Wirecutter has a 6,500 word review of not only what it considers the best pen (a uni-ball Jetstream), but all sorts of facts and tidbits about pens in general.

Take a look:

There are pretty much three types of non-fountain ink pens currently on the market that you can get on the cheap: ballpoint, rollerball and gel pens. All three are closely related, but, generally speaking, each has some advantages and disadvantages over the others…

…Ballpoint technology, invented in the 1800s, is the grandaddy of all of this. It was designed to be a better and easier way of dispensing ink—embedded in the point of a pen, a rolling ball transfers the ink to the page. Ballpoints use oil-based ink solutions, which dry quickly on the page, don’t bleed through much and don’t dry out easily in the pen itself. But ballpoints tend not to be very smooth to write with.

Rollerballs use water-based ink, which provides smoother, finer lines. They are available in a wider array of colors and require less pressure to use. But their inks tend to dry slowly on the page, can easily smudge and bleed, and can dry out in the pen itself.

Gel pens are technically a rollerball variant, but use a much thicker, more viscous ink. So gel pens don’t bleed as much as most rollerballs, and you still get very smooth, fine and vivid lines. But they still generally have smudging and drying problems, and the ink runs thick; a 0.5 mm gel pen will put down a wider line than 0.5 mm in other types.

But… pens? Why not grab whatever’s available?

Because, as the review says, the “difference between an awesome pen and a mediocre one is just a couple bucks.” So, awesome. We like that.

We also like that the pens reviewed had to be less than $5.

Image: The FJP’s Jihii Jolly demonstrates her handiwork with a pen by transcribing the first of Rainer Rilke’s Duino Elegies. Via her Instagram. Select to embiggen.

Virtual Reality and Animation Fetishes
Schediaphilia or “donald ducking” — terms used to describe sexual attraction to cartoon and virtual characters — has become a common fetish. PornMD reports that Hentai, a popular kind of Japanese animated porn, ranks in the top 10 most watched kinds of porn in many states in the US, as well as other places in the world.
Video games like Heavy Rain and Dragon Age have sexy scenes incorporated into the game’s storyline. And sites like PlayPornGames.com and AdultSexGames.com host a series of interactive and erotic virtual games that allow users to participate in sexual scenes. The animated porn site 3DKink.com even allows you to “become your own porn director” and create a 3D bondage game of your own that you can direct. 
Electronics engineer Jeroen Van den Bosch and his team of game designers are attempting to capitalize on the animated sex craze by working to create Wicked Paradise, the first erotic virtual reality game designed to work with the Oculus Rift (3D goggles with real time, panoramic views). Bosch told Road To VR that the virtual reality medium is perfect for erotica because the player can directly interact with the game’s environment, creating a more personal connection with the entertainment. 
Despite the prominent interest in animated sex, Internet and technology companies still have stringent rules when it comes to filtering adult content. Any video game that has “prolonged scenes of intense violence, graphic sexual content and/or gambling with real currency,” can get slapped with an Adults Only (AO) rating, which limits the overall audience. And with Tumblr hiding all things NSFW in the site’s search functions and Google Glass banning porn altogether, it may be awhile until virtual reality erotica becomes mainstream. 
FJP: But don’t fret, schediaphiliacs. The war on the animation fetish has not been won. Dancing Anymore, a controversial music video by the band Is Tropical was banned from YouTube 20 minutes after it was released because of its super sexy, animated content, and the video still managed to receive millions of views. If the interest in donald ducking continues (and I’m sure it will), you’ll be (g)oogling scantily clad cartoons through futuristic headsets before you know it.  — Krissy 
Image: Screenshot from Is Tropical’s music video Dancing Anymore

Virtual Reality and Animation Fetishes

Schediaphilia or “donald ducking” — terms used to describe sexual attraction to cartoon and virtual characters — has become a common fetish. PornMD reports that Hentai, a popular kind of Japanese animated porn, ranks in the top 10 most watched kinds of porn in many states in the US, as well as other places in the world.

Video games like Heavy Rain and Dragon Age have sexy scenes incorporated into the game’s storyline. And sites like PlayPornGames.com and AdultSexGames.com host a series of interactive and erotic virtual games that allow users to participate in sexual scenes. The animated porn site 3DKink.com even allows you to “become your own porn director” and create a 3D bondage game of your own that you can direct. 

Electronics engineer Jeroen Van den Bosch and his team of game designers are attempting to capitalize on the animated sex craze by working to create Wicked Paradise, the first erotic virtual reality game designed to work with the Oculus Rift (3D goggles with real time, panoramic views). Bosch told Road To VR that the virtual reality medium is perfect for erotica because the player can directly interact with the game’s environment, creating a more personal connection with the entertainment. 

Despite the prominent interest in animated sex, Internet and technology companies still have stringent rules when it comes to filtering adult content. Any video game that has “prolonged scenes of intense violence, graphic sexual content and/or gambling with real currency,” can get slapped with an Adults Only (AO) rating, which limits the overall audience. And with Tumblr hiding all things NSFW in the site’s search functions and Google Glass banning porn altogether, it may be awhile until virtual reality erotica becomes mainstream. 

FJP: But don’t fret, schediaphiliacs. The war on the animation fetish has not been won. Dancing Anymore, a controversial music video by the band Is Tropical was banned from YouTube 20 minutes after it was released because of its super sexy, animated content, and the video still managed to receive millions of views. If the interest in donald ducking continues (and I’m sure it will), you’ll be (g)oogling scantily clad cartoons through futuristic headsets before you know it.  — Krissy 

Image: Screenshot from Is Tropical’s music video Dancing Anymore

The UK’s War on Porn
Public wi-fi will soon ban access to porn in the UK, pornography depicting rape and child abuse will be outlawed, and all Internet Service Providers (ISPs) will use a specialized filtering system called “default-on” that requires Internet users to “opt out” of the filter if they wish to view adult content. Those are just some of the terms on the list of reforms that British Prime Minister David Cameron announced on Monday.
Cameron also said, “The Daily Mail has campaigned hard to make Internet search engine filters ‘default on.’ Today they can declare that campaign a success.” 
Turns out, that’s not really true. 
According to The Independent, many of the ISPs didn’t actually agree to a “default-on” system, but agreed instead to something called Active Choice + — a software restriction allowing people to filter out violent or sexual content if they want to (meaning that not all providers filter porn by default). 
A Department of Education letter (that was leaked to BBC) was sent to these ISPs on behalf of Cameron, demanding that they promote their software protection as “default-on” when it’s really not. The letter says: 

The Prime Minister believes that there is much more that we can all do to improve how we communicate the current position on parental Internet controls and that there is a need for a simplified message to reassure parents and the public more generally. Without changing what you will be offering (i.e. Active-Choice +), the Prime Minister would like to be able to refer to your solutions as “default-on.” 

Basically, Cameron wants to give the public a false sense of protection against adult content by telling people the new filters have been fully implemented.
New York Magazine describes Cameron’s method as “soft paternalism,” a term defined by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein’s book, Nudge, as a way to incentivize people who are otherwise “inherently choice-averse” by changing the environment ever so slightly; the change could then influence people to behave in whatever way desired. So, in theory, if people are given the sense that their Internet doesn’t allow porn, perhaps they won’t go searching for it in the first place. 
Former head of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre Jim Gamble told CNN that the UK government is having this averse reaction to porn because in two recent child murder cases, it was discovered that the killers had viewed child porn before the murders occurred. So, what started as a fight against child pornographers escalated to a fight against all porn.
Gamble says that what the government is doing is ineffective. Blocking porn on the Internet doesn’t stop the child pornographers from abusing children, it merely erases some evidence of it. Child pornographers don’t use Google for their pornography; they’re generally very knowledgeable about the Internet, and typically host these images on peer to peer sites deep within the web. So even if Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, Twitter, and Facebook, among others, agree to remove and report what they discover, they’re not finding the majority of the content. More money should be spent on rescuing these kids, and it’s not being done. 
FJP: One feeble method that’s in place to try to catch the perpetrators involves an online photo database of children that are thought to be at risk of abuse. If these child pornographers are as Internet savvy as Gamble says they are, and the government is creating an online gallery of children who are at risk, you might as well paint targets on their backs. - Krissy
Related FJP Porn Posts: Banning Porn, The Internet’s Effects on The Porn Industry
Image: NYMagazine

The UK’s War on Porn

Public wi-fi will soon ban access to porn in the UK, pornography depicting rape and child abuse will be outlawed, and all Internet Service Providers (ISPs) will use a specialized filtering system called “default-on” that requires Internet users to “opt out” of the filter if they wish to view adult content. Those are just some of the terms on the list of reforms that British Prime Minister David Cameron announced on Monday.

Cameron also said, “The Daily Mail has campaigned hard to make Internet search engine filters ‘default on.’ Today they can declare that campaign a success.” 

Turns out, that’s not really true. 

According to The Independent, many of the ISPs didn’t actually agree to a “default-on” system, but agreed instead to something called Active Choice + — a software restriction allowing people to filter out violent or sexual content if they want to (meaning that not all providers filter porn by default). 

A Department of Education letter (that was leaked to BBC) was sent to these ISPs on behalf of Cameron, demanding that they promote their software protection as “default-on” when it’s really not. The letter says: 

The Prime Minister believes that there is much more that we can all do to improve how we communicate the current position on parental Internet controls and that there is a need for a simplified message to reassure parents and the public more generally. Without changing what you will be offering (i.e. Active-Choice +), the Prime Minister would like to be able to refer to your solutions as “default-on.” 

Basically, Cameron wants to give the public a false sense of protection against adult content by telling people the new filters have been fully implemented.

New York Magazine describes Cameron’s method as “soft paternalism,” a term defined by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein’s book, Nudge, as a way to incentivize people who are otherwise “inherently choice-averse” by changing the environment ever so slightly; the change could then influence people to behave in whatever way desired. So, in theory, if people are given the sense that their Internet doesn’t allow porn, perhaps they won’t go searching for it in the first place. 

Former head of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre Jim Gamble told CNN that the UK government is having this averse reaction to porn because in two recent child murder cases, it was discovered that the killers had viewed child porn before the murders occurred. So, what started as a fight against child pornographers escalated to a fight against all porn.

Gamble says that what the government is doing is ineffective. Blocking porn on the Internet doesn’t stop the child pornographers from abusing children, it merely erases some evidence of it. Child pornographers don’t use Google for their pornography; they’re generally very knowledgeable about the Internet, and typically host these images on peer to peer sites deep within the web. So even if Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, Twitter, and Facebook, among others, agree to remove and report what they discover, they’re not finding the majority of the content. More money should be spent on rescuing these kids, and it’s not being done. 

FJP: One feeble method that’s in place to try to catch the perpetrators involves an online photo database of children that are thought to be at risk of abuse. If these child pornographers are as Internet savvy as Gamble says they are, and the government is creating an online gallery of children who are at risk, you might as well paint targets on their backs. - Krissy

Related FJP Porn Posts: Banning PornThe Internet’s Effects on The Porn Industry

Image: NYMagazine

Erotica Controversies
The 1st District Court of Appeals in San Francisco granted inmate Andres Martinez the right to read a werewolf erotica novel in prison. The book in question was The Silver Crown by Mathilde Madden (a pseudonym used by Guardian contributor, Mathilda Gregory).
NPR says the two year legal battle to read the book began when guards at Pelican Bay State Prison confiscated the novel on the grounds that it was pornographic. 
According to TIME, California banned porn from prisons in 2002 to prevent inmates from creating a “hostile work environment” for female guards. But in the 1973 case of Miller vs. California, The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that if a literary work has scientific or political value, it can’t be deemed “obscene.” Outlawing all works that describe sex would go against the standard. 
So, after 30 pages of decision making, the court decided that the book possesses “serious literary value” and doesn’t qualify as straight up porn. The Warden of Pelican Bay State Prison has been ordered to “allow petitioner to receive, possess, and read his copy of The Silver Crown.” Victory.
And if this erotica scandal isn’t hot enough for the press, the first female deputy CIA director, Avril Haines, is being what Salon calls “slut-shamed” for hosting “erotica nights.”
According to The Daily Beast, in the 1990s, Haines co-owned Adrian’s Book Cafe in Baltimore, Md. The cafe used to feature events where published guests would read their erotic prose. Apparently, Haines even read some racy excerpts herself from Anne Rice’s Sleeping Beauty Trilogy. 
FJP: What does any of this have to do with the fact that Haines is the new CIA director? Nothing. So why bring it up?
Media Matters suggests that the press applies a “shockingly different standard” to what they cover in regards to accomplished females vs. males in Washington D.C. The media assumes that a woman’s sexuality, or even what she wears, defines who she is (see: Purse Politics: Tote and Vote), and that’s a standard that’s “almost never applied to male counterparts.” 
Would this story be being beaten to death (here, here, here, here, here, and here, to name only a few articles) if Haines was a man who used to be into smutty reading nights? Or is a woman’s sexuality just infinitely more interesting? Also… if a male inmate can read what he wants, shouldn’t Haines have the same right? - Krissy
Image: Salon 

Erotica Controversies

The 1st District Court of Appeals in San Francisco granted inmate Andres Martinez the right to read a werewolf erotica novel in prison. The book in question was The Silver Crown by Mathilde Madden (a pseudonym used by Guardian contributor, Mathilda Gregory).

NPR says the two year legal battle to read the book began when guards at Pelican Bay State Prison confiscated the novel on the grounds that it was pornographic. 

According to TIME, California banned porn from prisons in 2002 to prevent inmates from creating a “hostile work environment” for female guards. But in the 1973 case of Miller vs. California, The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that if a literary work has scientific or political value, it can’t be deemed “obscene.” Outlawing all works that describe sex would go against the standard. 

So, after 30 pages of decision making, the court decided that the book possesses “serious literary value” and doesn’t qualify as straight up porn. The Warden of Pelican Bay State Prison has been ordered to “allow petitioner to receive, possess, and read his copy of The Silver Crown.” Victory.

And if this erotica scandal isn’t hot enough for the press, the first female deputy CIA director, Avril Haines, is being what Salon calls “slut-shamed” for hosting “erotica nights.”

According to The Daily Beast, in the 1990s, Haines co-owned Adrian’s Book Cafe in Baltimore, Md. The cafe used to feature events where published guests would read their erotic prose. Apparently, Haines even read some racy excerpts herself from Anne Rice’s Sleeping Beauty Trilogy

FJP: What does any of this have to do with the fact that Haines is the new CIA director? Nothing. So why bring it up?

Media Matters suggests that the press applies a “shockingly different standard” to what they cover in regards to accomplished females vs. males in Washington D.C. The media assumes that a woman’s sexuality, or even what she wears, defines who she is (see: Purse Politics: Tote and Vote), and that’s a standard that’s “almost never applied to male counterparts.” 

Would this story be being beaten to death (hereherehereherehere, and here, to name only a few articles) if Haines was a man who used to be into smutty reading nights? Or is a woman’s sexuality just infinitely more interesting? Also… if a male inmate can read what he wants, shouldn’t Haines have the same right? - Krissy

Image: Salon 

The Internet’s Effects on The Porn Industry
The popularity of porn is at an all-time high thanks to the Internet. Slate cites an estimate that says there are almost 25 million adult sites worldwide which make up 12 percent of all websites total. Daily Infographic reports that 28, 258 people are looking at Internet porn every second and 40 million Americans are regular adult website visitors. 
Aside from being a great distribution tool, the Internet also brings greater recognition to individual adult performers. Porn star couple James Deen and Stoya are what The Village Voice calls “The Jay-Z and Beyonce” of porn — and the two of them owe a lot of their fame to online activity. Net-followers refer to themselves as “Deenagers" and "Stoyanauts,” and they dedicate their time to tracking the couple’s every social media move (see Stoya’s Tumblr and James Deen’s Twitter.) Even established porn stars like Nina Hartley and Alexis Texas amp up their fame with their own websites dedicated exclusively to their individual work.
But even though porn popularity is at an all time high, profits are dippin’ low. 72-year-old porn actor, Dave Cummings, told The Huffington Post that piracy has “killed the industry.” Theo Sapoutzis, CEO and Chairman of Adult Video News (AVN), estimates that porn made $13 to $15 billion during its peak in the early 2000s, but now DVD sales have dropped by 50 percent since 2007 due to illegal uploads. (Note:”Estimates” is the keyword here. Because so many porn businesses are privately owned, it’s impossible to determine the exact gross income of the industry.)
FJP: Despite the blows to profits, the porn industry hasn’t totally deflated yet. Sherri Shaulis, an editor at AVN, says that video companies are now creating their own sex toys and lingerie to make up for losing money on DVD sales. Also, The Institute of Network Cultures notes that even though free porn sites make up 70-80 percent of adult content online, they usually function as “bait” to lure people to pay-to-watch, premium websites with better quality content.
So, people who want that classy, story-driven, Hollywood-lit coitus have to pay their dues. And hey, that’s fair. (And all is always fair… in love, and German Whore Fare.) - Krissy
Sort of Related: Speaking of premium pornographic material, artist, Jonathan Harris, created I Love Your Work, a clickable, interactive documentary on nine women who work in lesbian porn (here’s the trailer). The project is limited to 10 viewers per day and it costs $10 for 24 hours of access to six hours of material. In the FAQ section of the project’s website, Harris says he only allows 10 viewers per day because it’s “an experiment in delayed gratification.” He says that “Internet porn is abundant, and most websites attempt to accumulate as many viewers as possible. It seemed interesting to do the opposite.” Check it out. 
Image: 2Space.net

The Internet’s Effects on The Porn Industry

The popularity of porn is at an all-time high thanks to the Internet. Slate cites an estimate that says there are almost 25 million adult sites worldwide which make up 12 percent of all websites total. Daily Infographic reports that 28, 258 people are looking at Internet porn every second and 40 million Americans are regular adult website visitors. 

Aside from being a great distribution tool, the Internet also brings greater recognition to individual adult performers. Porn star couple James Deen and Stoya are what The Village Voice calls “The Jay-Z and Beyonce” of porn — and the two of them owe a lot of their fame to online activity. Net-followers refer to themselves as “Deenagers" and "Stoyanauts,” and they dedicate their time to tracking the couple’s every social media move (see Stoya’s Tumblr and James Deen’s Twitter.) Even established porn stars like Nina Hartley and Alexis Texas amp up their fame with their own websites dedicated exclusively to their individual work.

But even though porn popularity is at an all time high, profits are dippin’ low. 72-year-old porn actor, Dave Cummings, told The Huffington Post that piracy has “killed the industry.” Theo Sapoutzis, CEO and Chairman of Adult Video News (AVN), estimates that porn made $13 to $15 billion during its peak in the early 2000s, but now DVD sales have dropped by 50 percent since 2007 due to illegal uploads. (Note:”Estimates” is the keyword here. Because so many porn businesses are privately owned, it’s impossible to determine the exact gross income of the industry.)

FJP: Despite the blows to profits, the porn industry hasn’t totally deflated yet. Sherri Shaulis, an editor at AVN, says that video companies are now creating their own sex toys and lingerie to make up for losing money on DVD sales. Also, The Institute of Network Cultures notes that even though free porn sites make up 70-80 percent of adult content online, they usually function as “bait” to lure people to pay-to-watch, premium websites with better quality content.

So, people who want that classy, story-driven, Hollywood-lit coitus have to pay their dues. And hey, that’s fair. (And all is always fair… in love, and German Whore Fare.) - Krissy

Sort of Related: Speaking of premium pornographic material, artist, Jonathan Harris, created I Love Your Work, a clickable, interactive documentary on nine women who work in lesbian porn (here’s the trailer). The project is limited to 10 viewers per day and it costs $10 for 24 hours of access to six hours of material. In the FAQ section of the project’s website, Harris says he only allows 10 viewers per day because it’s “an experiment in delayed gratification.” He says that “Internet porn is abundant, and most websites attempt to accumulate as many viewers as possible. It seemed interesting to do the opposite.” Check it out. 

Image: 2Space.net

Banning Porn
According to Smithsonian, the desire to ban porn exists all over the world. The UK Prime Minister, David Cameron, wants all porn to be blocked from public spaces to maintain “clean Wifi.” There are websites exclusively dedicated to banishing porn in the U.S. And Iceland has even proposed to get rid of Internet porn altogether. 
Despite these efforts, The Economist points out that porn is impossible to eliminate from the Web. Algorithms can’t catch everything, which means to totally get rid of porn, humans would need to scour the Internet all day for inappropriate content. 
Slate writes that when Yahoo CEO, Marissa Mayer, was met with suggestions to restrict porn on Tumblr for the sake of Yahoo’s reputation, she refused. The “Not Safe For Work” (NSFW) tag that Tumblr already offers is sufficient enough at filtering pornography, and Mayer wants Tumblr to maintain the “richness and breadth of content” that it’s known for. 
And that richness and breadth is going to be hard to beat back. An infographic by Paintbottle shows that 70 percent of men and 30 percent of women watch porn — with the average viewer visiting porn sites 7.5 times per month for an average of 12 minutes at a time.
Smithsonian says that one of the driving forces behind this porn paranoia is that children are learning about sex through porn and not sex education classes. Parents are afraid of porn’s influence on minors who aren’t properly educated on intercourse.
Apparently, this concern isn’t without merit. Aside from kids accidentally stumbling upon porn while web-surfing, porn shows up in public places. In Slate’s Manners For The Digital Age podcast, a woman explains that a passenger had been watching porn on his portable DVD player in close proximity to herself, her daughter, and her young and impressionable granddaughter during their flight.
FJP: In an attempt to make porn more “appropriate,” L.A. County passed Measure B — a law forcing porn actors to use condoms in their scenes and to receive STD training before performing. The law also forces adult film producers to pay a fee for Department of Public Health inspections. 
So should your child stumble upon some pre-marital, raunchy, no-holds barred Internet sex, at least there will be a thin layer of latex to shield them from that silly strain of death-gonorrhea. - Krissy
Image: Found down in the NSFW, dirty depths of Tumblr. 

Banning Porn

According to Smithsonian, the desire to ban porn exists all over the world. The UK Prime Minister, David Cameron, wants all porn to be blocked from public spaces to maintain “clean Wifi.” There are websites exclusively dedicated to banishing porn in the U.S. And Iceland has even proposed to get rid of Internet porn altogether. 

Despite these efforts, The Economist points out that porn is impossible to eliminate from the Web. Algorithms can’t catch everything, which means to totally get rid of porn, humans would need to scour the Internet all day for inappropriate content. 

Slate writes that when Yahoo CEO, Marissa Mayer, was met with suggestions to restrict porn on Tumblr for the sake of Yahoo’s reputation, she refused. The “Not Safe For Work” (NSFW) tag that Tumblr already offers is sufficient enough at filtering pornography, and Mayer wants Tumblr to maintain the “richness and breadth of content” that it’s known for. 

And that richness and breadth is going to be hard to beat back. An infographic by Paintbottle shows that 70 percent of men and 30 percent of women watch porn — with the average viewer visiting porn sites 7.5 times per month for an average of 12 minutes at a time.

Smithsonian says that one of the driving forces behind this porn paranoia is that children are learning about sex through porn and not sex education classes. Parents are afraid of porn’s influence on minors who aren’t properly educated on intercourse.

Apparently, this concern isn’t without merit. Aside from kids accidentally stumbling upon porn while web-surfing, porn shows up in public places. In Slate’s Manners For The Digital Age podcast, a woman explains that a passenger had been watching porn on his portable DVD player in close proximity to herself, her daughter, and her young and impressionable granddaughter during their flight.

FJP: In an attempt to make porn more “appropriate,” L.A. County passed Measure B — a law forcing porn actors to use condoms in their scenes and to receive STD training before performing. The law also forces adult film producers to pay a fee for Department of Public Health inspections. 

So should your child stumble upon some pre-marital, raunchy, no-holds barred Internet sex, at least there will be a thin layer of latex to shield them from that silly strain of death-gonorrhea. - Krissy

Image: Found down in the NSFW, dirty depths of Tumblr

Porn Studies is the first dedicated, international, peer-reviewed journal to critically explore those cultural products and services designated as pornographic and their cultural, economic, historical, institutional, legal and social contexts. Porn Studies will publish innovative work examining specifically sexual and explicit media forms, their connections to wider media landscapes and their links to the broader spheres of (sex) work across historical periods and national contexts.

Porn Studies is an interdisciplinary journal informed by critical sexuality studies and work exploring the intersection of sexuality, gender, race, class, age and ability. It focuses on developing knowledge of pornographies past and present, in all their variations and around the world. Because pornography studies are still in their infancy we are also interested in discussions that focus on theoretical approaches, methodology and research ethics. Alongside articles, the journal includes a forum devoted to shorter observations, developments, debates or issues in porn studies, designed to encourage exchange and debate.

— Announcement from England’s Routledge Publishing, an academic publisher of books, journals and online reference materials. In the announcement (PDF), the editors make a call for papers and say the first issue of Porn Studies will come out in Spring 2014.

‘Without any mental deliberation, picture the average female porn star. Just let her spring into your mind’s eye looking however she looks. Can you see her?’

I’d bumped into a friend who I’d not seen in a while and this was the first question I asked him. He didn’t realise at the time that I’d be in self-imposed smutty exile for an untold number of weeks, working on the largest study of porn stars ever undertaken, and now I was out and eager to spread the news.

‘Erm, yeah, I suppose,’ he said.

‘What does she look like?’ I asked, struggling to hide my smile.

When he replied by saying ‘a blonde with big boobs’, I must admit I relished the opportunity to lean in, let the grin spread across my tired face, and say ‘That’s what everyone says. And in fact, it’s wrong’.

‘Oh,’ he said, after I explained how I knew what the average porn star actually looks like, as well what her name probably is, how many films she’s most likely done and the probability of her having a tattoo or body piercing.

‘So you’ve spent all this time watching hundreds of porn movies?’

‘No,’ I said. ‘I’ve spent all this time analysing the demographic profiles and filmographies of ten thousand adult performers. There is a difference.’

‘I see’, he then said. ‘And how, dare I ask, does one go about doing that?’

There’s data porn and there’s porn data. Combining the two is Jon Millward, a self-described “Ideas Detective”.

Millward spent six months going over a ten thousand person porn star database to determine “what the average performer looks like, what they do on film, and how their role has evolved over the last forty years.”

The result is both a longread analysis and multiple data visualizations of things you never know you’d be interested to know.

Jon Millward, Deep Inside: A Study of 10,000 Porn Stars and Their Careers.

Somewhat relatedSex Diseases Cost $16 Billion a Year to Treat, CDC Says

Porn is Larger than You Think
Take Extreme Tech:

Xvideos, the largest porn site on the web with 4.4 billion page views per month, is three times the size of CNN or ESPN, and twice the size of Reddit.

And add Pacific Standard:

And while the average visitor to your typical news site spends only a few minutes there, porn visitors linger for four or five times as long.

And you’re left with an FJP imponderable: Porn sites, where for some unknown reason, people linger just a little bit longer.
Image: Manipulated detail, Ugh, by Patrick Charles. Flickr/Creative Commons.

Porn is Larger than You Think

Take Extreme Tech:

Xvideos, the largest porn site on the web with 4.4 billion page views per month, is three times the size of CNN or ESPN, and twice the size of Reddit.

And add Pacific Standard:

And while the average visitor to your typical news site spends only a few minutes there, porn visitors linger for four or five times as long.

And you’re left with an FJP imponderable: Porn sites, where for some unknown reason, people linger just a little bit longer.

Image: Manipulated detail, Ugh, by Patrick Charles. Flickr/Creative Commons.

So What is it that Journalists Actually Do? →

Via Jonathan Stray at Nieman Lab:

In the endless debate about what the “future of journalism” holds, “journalism” doesn’t have a very clear meaning. We’re in the midst of hot arguments over who is a journalist, whether social media is journalism, whether data is journalism, whether cherished tenets like objectivity are necessary for journalism. As the print advertising model that funded the bulk of working journalists collapses and forces transformation, it’s pressing to know what is worth preserving, or building anew.

After decades where “journalism is what journalists do” was good enough, there is a sudden a bloom of definitions. Some claim that “original reporting” is the core, deliberately excluding curation, aggregation, and analysis. Others say “investigative reporting” is the thing that counts, while a recent FCC report uses the term “accountability journalism” liberally. These are all efforts to define some key journalistic act, some central thing we can rally around.

I don’t think I could tell you what the true core of journalism is. But I think I have a pretty good idea of what journalists actually do. It’s a lot of things, all of them valuable, none of them the exclusive province of the professional. Journalists go to the scene and write or narrate or shoot what is happening. They do months-long investigations and publish stories that hold power accountable. They ask pointed questions of authorities. They read public records and bring obscure but relevant facts to light. All of this is very traditional, very comfortable newswork.

But journalists do all sorts of other things too. They use their powerful communication channels to bring attention to issues that they didn’t, themselves, first report. They curate and filter the noise of the Internet. They assemble all of the relevant articles in one place. They explain complicated subjects. They liveblog. They retweet the revolution. And even in the age of the Internet, there is value to being nothing more than a reliable conduit for bits; just pointing a camera at the news — and keeping it live no matter what — is an important journalistic act.

The what is a journalist question reminds me of US Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart’s attempt to define porn: “I shall not today attempt further to define the kinds of material I understand to be embraced within that shorthand description; and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I see it…”

Journalism: we know it when we see it. — Michael