Posts tagged portraits

The Women of the Afghanistan War
The Atlantic’s In Focus blog has a moving photo gallery depicting women from various aspects of the nearly 12-year-old war. This includes NATO soldiers along with Afghan artists, soldiers, prisoners and rappers among many others.
Image: Via The Atlantic — “An Afghan widow takes part in a demonstration at a CARE International food distribution center in Kabul, on March 6, 2006. Hundreds of widows staged a protest as they urged CARE to continue food distribution. (Reuters/Ahmad Masood)” Select to embiggen. 

The Women of the Afghanistan War

The Atlantic’s In Focus blog has a moving photo gallery depicting women from various aspects of the nearly 12-year-old war. This includes NATO soldiers along with Afghan artists, soldiers, prisoners and rappers among many others.

Image: Via The Atlantic — “An Afghan widow takes part in a demonstration at a CARE International food distribution center in Kabul, on March 6, 2006. Hundreds of widows staged a protest as they urged CARE to continue food distribution. (Reuters/Ahmad Masood)” Select to embiggen. 

Sony 2013 World Photography Winners

Top: Jens Juul, winner, Professional Portraiture, for Six Degress of Copenhagen.

Left: Andrea Gjestvang, Grand Prize winner, for One Day in History, portraits of survivors of the 2011 massacre in Utoeya, Norway.

Right: Valerio Bispuri, winner, Contemporary Issues, for Prisons of South America.

Select any to embiggen.

Winners across all categories along with photo galleries of their can be viewed at the World Photography Organization’s web site.

Floppy Portraits
I don’t have any but if I did have floppy disks, and if I did have talent, and if I did have a creative bent that brought the idea to mind, I’d make floppy disk portraits like those created by Nick Gentry.
But I don’t.
So instead, head over to Colossal for more floppy disk portraits and a short video about Gentry and his work.

Floppy Portraits

I don’t have any but if I did have floppy disks, and if I did have talent, and if I did have a creative bent that brought the idea to mind, I’d make floppy disk portraits like those created by Nick Gentry.

But I don’t.

So instead, head over to Colossal for more floppy disk portraits and a short video about Gentry and his work.

Valley City Frog Jumping
Via Sports Illustrated:

"Spawned by Mark Twain’s "Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," the Valley City, Ohio, event attracts 400 to 500 contestants annually. Trophies are given for the highest total and longest individual jump. In this photo, the boy’s hesitation at taking the frog is priceless — it reminds of Jack Benny telling a joke."

By Bill Frakes.
Here at the mothership I’m researching sports photography. I loved this image since I first saw it but am trying to source when and where that actually was. From the image’s metadata I think it’s from 2008 but can’t confirm. — Michael

Valley City Frog Jumping

Via Sports Illustrated:

"Spawned by Mark Twain’s "Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," the Valley City, Ohio, event attracts 400 to 500 contestants annually. Trophies are given for the highest total and longest individual jump. In this photo, the boy’s hesitation at taking the frog is priceless — it reminds of Jack Benny telling a joke."

By Bill Frakes.

Here at the mothership I’m researching sports photography. I loved this image since I first saw it but am trying to source when and where that actually was. From the image’s metadata I think it’s from 2008 but can’t confirm. — Michael

"Most of the people you see here are dead. My images have not really helped them. Maybe they’ll help people in the future. Maybe they’ll help with fund-raising here and there. But to these particular people, they did not help." — Misha Friedman, New York Times. Saving Lives or Photographing Them?
The New York Times Lens Blog profiles Misha Friedman, a photographer who left his adminitrative job with Doctors Without Borders in order to document tuberculosis in the former Soviet Union.
Image: A Russian woman with tuberculosis, hepatitis C and HIV at a St. Petersburg hospital, by Misha Friedman via the New York Times.

"Most of the people you see here are dead. My images have not really helped them. Maybe they’ll help people in the future. Maybe they’ll help with fund-raising here and there. But to these particular people, they did not help." — Misha Friedman, New York Times. Saving Lives or Photographing Them?

The New York Times Lens Blog profiles Misha Friedman, a photographer who left his adminitrative job with Doctors Without Borders in order to document tuberculosis in the former Soviet Union.

Image: A Russian woman with tuberculosis, hepatitis C and HIV at a St. Petersburg hospital, by Misha Friedman via the New York Times.

The New York Times released photographs from its Picturing 7 Billion crowdsourcing project, an effort to depict the world as its population crossed another threshold last month.
As the Times’ Lens Blog points out, “There is little rhyme or reason to the order you see.”
And that’s ok. Serendipity can be a good thing.
Image: Street children in Chittagong, North Agrabad, Bangladesh by Norman Joy Baroi. New York Times, Pictured: A World at 7 Billion.

The New York Times released photographs from its Picturing 7 Billion crowdsourcing project, an effort to depict the world as its population crossed another threshold last month.

As the Times’ Lens Blog points out, “There is little rhyme or reason to the order you see.”

And that’s ok. Serendipity can be a good thing.

Image: Street children in Chittagong, North Agrabad, Bangladesh by Norman Joy Baroi. New York Times, Pictured: A World at 7 Billion.

Train-Surfing in Bangladesh
Via Slate:

…In the process of documenting train riders for the project, [Bangladeshi photographer G.M.B.] Akash encountered hundreds of low-paid workers for whom roof-surfing was an economic necessity. He met mothers squeezed onto the small spaces between carriages, nothing protecting their babies from the moving rails below except their arms. He met homeless children with nowhere particular to go, who simply enjoy living dangerously. He captured all these characters in bold color, their purple shirts and clashing paisley prints infiltrating routine commutes with deceptively joyous electricity. 
When Akash was growing up in Bangladesh, photography was not considered a career. The idea that a boy would want to dedicate himself to pictures was incomprehensible to the aspiring doctors and engineers around him.
“People had no knowledge at that time how a photographer could change the world,” he says.

Image: Helaluddin, 18, on his off-day from the plastic factory where he works in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Via Slate.

Train-Surfing in Bangladesh

Via Slate:

…In the process of documenting train riders for the project, [Bangladeshi photographer G.M.B.] Akash encountered hundreds of low-paid workers for whom roof-surfing was an economic necessity. He met mothers squeezed onto the small spaces between carriages, nothing protecting their babies from the moving rails below except their arms. He met homeless children with nowhere particular to go, who simply enjoy living dangerously. He captured all these characters in bold color, their purple shirts and clashing paisley prints infiltrating routine commutes with deceptively joyous electricity. 

When Akash was growing up in Bangladesh, photography was not considered a career. The idea that a boy would want to dedicate himself to pictures was incomprehensible to the aspiring doctors and engineers around him.

People had no knowledge at that time how a photographer could change the world,” he says.

Image: Helaluddin, 18, on his off-day from the plastic factory where he works in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Via Slate.

Mali Celebrates African Photographers
Via the BBC:

Hundreds of artists, collectors and curators have gathered in Mali to celebrate one of Africa’s biggest photography exhibitions, Bamako Encounters. Ecological concerns are a major theme this year. This work is from the series A Vanishing Wetland by Nigerian artist Akintunde Akinyele.

Mali Celebrates African Photographers

Via the BBC:

Hundreds of artists, collectors and curators have gathered in Mali to celebrate one of Africa’s biggest photography exhibitions, Bamako Encounters. Ecological concerns are a major theme this year. This work is from the series A Vanishing Wetland by Nigerian artist Akintunde Akinyele.

In June the Associated Press announced that it would open a news bureau in North Korea. 
Earlier in the year, AP photographer David Guttenfelder and Seoul bureau chief Jean H. Lee were given “unprecedented access” to the country.
Pictures from their trip are running at the Atlantic which notes:
The pair made visits to familiar sites accompanied by government minders, and were also allowed to travel into the countryside accompanied by North Korean journalists instead of government officials. Though much of what the AP journalists saw was certainly orchestrated, their access was still remarkable.
Image: Women perform a dance routine with badminton rackets at an event to mark the birthday of Kim Il Sung at a park in Pyongyang, North Korea, on April 15, 2011. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

In June the Associated Press announced that it would open a news bureau in North Korea. 

Earlier in the year, AP photographer David Guttenfelder and Seoul bureau chief Jean H. Lee were given “unprecedented access” to the country.

Pictures from their trip are running at the Atlantic which notes:

The pair made visits to familiar sites accompanied by government minders, and were also allowed to travel into the countryside accompanied by North Korean journalists instead of government officials. Though much of what the AP journalists saw was certainly orchestrated, their access was still remarkable.

Image: Women perform a dance routine with badminton rackets at an event to mark the birthday of Kim Il Sung at a park in Pyongyang, North Korea, on April 15, 2011. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

Photo of the Day: A Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) soldier stands in line during a rehearsal for the Independence Day ceremony in Juba, on July 5, 2011. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic).
Via the Atlantic:

Last Saturday, the Republic of South Sudan declared its independence, creating the newest nation in the world — the 193rd nation to join the United Nations. The new country has been in the making since a referendum last January, when nearly 4 million southern Sudanese voted to secede from Sudan by a margin of more than 98 percent. The region has been involved in civil wars for at least the past 50 years, and the days-old nation is already battling several armed groups within its new borders. Many issues still remain unresolved — the oil-rich region continues to rely on pipelines that run through Sudan, and a revenue-sharing agreement has not been reached. The new nation, which is comprised of more than 200 ethnic groups, has a largely rural economy, and poverty, civil warfare, and political instability will be the biggest of many challenges for the new administration. Gathered here are scenes from South Sudan as it made its debut on the world stage this weekend.

Check it: 35 images of a newly born nation.

Photo of the Day: A Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) soldier stands in line during a rehearsal for the Independence Day ceremony in Juba, on July 5, 2011. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic).

Via the Atlantic:

Last Saturday, the Republic of South Sudan declared its independence, creating the newest nation in the world — the 193rd nation to join the United Nations. The new country has been in the making since a referendum last January, when nearly 4 million southern Sudanese voted to secede from Sudan by a margin of more than 98 percent. The region has been involved in civil wars for at least the past 50 years, and the days-old nation is already battling several armed groups within its new borders. Many issues still remain unresolved — the oil-rich region continues to rely on pipelines that run through Sudan, and a revenue-sharing agreement has not been reached. The new nation, which is comprised of more than 200 ethnic groups, has a largely rural economy, and poverty, civil warfare, and political instability will be the biggest of many challenges for the new administration. Gathered here are scenes from South Sudan as it made its debut on the world stage this weekend.

Check it: 35 images of a newly born nation.

Monkey See, Monkey Do
Via The Daily Mail:

To capture the perfect wildlife image, you usually have to be in exactly the right place at precisely the right time.
But in this instance, David Slater wasn’t there at all and he still got a result.
Visiting a national park in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, award-winning photographer Mr Slater left his camera unattended for a while.
It soon attracted the attention of an inquisitive female from a local group of crested black macaque monkeys, known for their intelligence and dexterity.
Fascinated by her reflection in the lens, she then somehow managed to start the camera. The upshot: A splendid self-portrait.

Monkey See, Monkey Do

Via The Daily Mail:

To capture the perfect wildlife image, you usually have to be in exactly the right place at precisely the right time.

But in this instance, David Slater wasn’t there at all and he still got a result.

Visiting a national park in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, award-winning photographer Mr Slater left his camera unattended for a while.

It soon attracted the attention of an inquisitive female from a local group of crested black macaque monkeys, known for their intelligence and dexterity.

Fascinated by her reflection in the lens, she then somehow managed to start the camera. The upshot: A splendid self-portrait.