Posts tagged potd

Thirteen-Year-Old Girl Showing Who’s Boss While Hunting With Eagle on Mongolian Mountain Top
Via BBC.

Thirteen-Year-Old Girl Showing Who’s Boss While Hunting With Eagle on Mongolian Mountain Top

Via BBC.

It’s only 9am but I’m nominating this as our photo of the day.
Image: A supporter of the social activist Anna Hazare waved an Indian flag amid discharge from fumigation work in Mumbai on Monday. Mr. Hazare plans to begin a three-day fast on Tuesday to press for anti corruption legislation. Danish Siddiqui/Reuters via the New York Times.

It’s only 9am but I’m nominating this as our photo of the day.

Image: A supporter of the social activist Anna Hazare waved an Indian flag amid discharge from fumigation work in Mumbai on Monday. Mr. Hazare plans to begin a three-day fast on Tuesday to press for anti corruption legislation. Danish Siddiqui/Reuters via the New York Times.

The New York Times released photographs from its Picturing 7 Billion crowdsourcing project, an effort to depict the world as its population crossed another threshold last month.
As the Times’ Lens Blog points out, “There is little rhyme or reason to the order you see.”
And that’s ok. Serendipity can be a good thing.
Image: Street children in Chittagong, North Agrabad, Bangladesh by Norman Joy Baroi. New York Times, Pictured: A World at 7 Billion.

The New York Times released photographs from its Picturing 7 Billion crowdsourcing project, an effort to depict the world as its population crossed another threshold last month.

As the Times’ Lens Blog points out, “There is little rhyme or reason to the order you see.”

And that’s ok. Serendipity can be a good thing.

Image: Street children in Chittagong, North Agrabad, Bangladesh by Norman Joy Baroi. New York Times, Pictured: A World at 7 Billion.

Train-Surfing in Bangladesh
Via Slate:

…In the process of documenting train riders for the project, [Bangladeshi photographer G.M.B.] Akash encountered hundreds of low-paid workers for whom roof-surfing was an economic necessity. He met mothers squeezed onto the small spaces between carriages, nothing protecting their babies from the moving rails below except their arms. He met homeless children with nowhere particular to go, who simply enjoy living dangerously. He captured all these characters in bold color, their purple shirts and clashing paisley prints infiltrating routine commutes with deceptively joyous electricity. 
When Akash was growing up in Bangladesh, photography was not considered a career. The idea that a boy would want to dedicate himself to pictures was incomprehensible to the aspiring doctors and engineers around him.
“People had no knowledge at that time how a photographer could change the world,” he says.

Image: Helaluddin, 18, on his off-day from the plastic factory where he works in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Via Slate.

Train-Surfing in Bangladesh

Via Slate:

…In the process of documenting train riders for the project, [Bangladeshi photographer G.M.B.] Akash encountered hundreds of low-paid workers for whom roof-surfing was an economic necessity. He met mothers squeezed onto the small spaces between carriages, nothing protecting their babies from the moving rails below except their arms. He met homeless children with nowhere particular to go, who simply enjoy living dangerously. He captured all these characters in bold color, their purple shirts and clashing paisley prints infiltrating routine commutes with deceptively joyous electricity. 

When Akash was growing up in Bangladesh, photography was not considered a career. The idea that a boy would want to dedicate himself to pictures was incomprehensible to the aspiring doctors and engineers around him.

People had no knowledge at that time how a photographer could change the world,” he says.

Image: Helaluddin, 18, on his off-day from the plastic factory where he works in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Via Slate.

Mali Celebrates African Photographers
Via the BBC:

Hundreds of artists, collectors and curators have gathered in Mali to celebrate one of Africa’s biggest photography exhibitions, Bamako Encounters. Ecological concerns are a major theme this year. This work is from the series A Vanishing Wetland by Nigerian artist Akintunde Akinyele.

Mali Celebrates African Photographers

Via the BBC:

Hundreds of artists, collectors and curators have gathered in Mali to celebrate one of Africa’s biggest photography exhibitions, Bamako Encounters. Ecological concerns are a major theme this year. This work is from the series A Vanishing Wetland by Nigerian artist Akintunde Akinyele.

nationalpost:

Photos of the dayA crowd of tourists run away as a tidal bore breaks through the dam by the Qiangtang River in Haining, China, Aug. 31, 2011. (AFP/Getty Images)

FJP: YIKES!

nationalpost:

Photos of the day
A crowd of tourists run away as a tidal bore breaks through the dam by the Qiangtang River in Haining, China, Aug. 31, 2011. (AFP/Getty Images)

FJP: YIKES!

Photographer Katie Orlinsky traveled to Mexico to document the drug war’s effect on women and concludes that with an overall death toll of more than 30,000, the country faces a humanitarian crisis.

These photos are from the women’s prison in Ciudad Juarez where approximately 80 percent of the inmates are incarcerated for drug-related crimes. Throughout Mexico, the incarceration rate for women has risen 400 percent since 2007.

Katie Orlinsky, The New York Times. Mexico’s Drug War, Feminized.

Picture of the Day: A masked man on the streets of Hackney where a car burns out of control on the third day of street disturbances across London. Photograph: Kerim Okten/EPA.
Photo and caption from the front page of the Tuesday August 9, 2011 edition of the Guardian.
I like the photo so much I’m uploading without the rest of the front page from the last post. You should be able to click it to see the biggie version.

Picture of the Day: A masked man on the streets of Hackney where a car burns out of control on the third day of street disturbances across London. Photograph: Kerim Okten/EPA.

Photo and caption from the front page of the Tuesday August 9, 2011 edition of the Guardian.

I like the photo so much I’m uploading without the rest of the front page from the last post. You should be able to click it to see the biggie version.

Photo of the Day: Bee Keeper Lu Kongjiang competes in a “bee-attracting” contest in China’s Hunan province. He was eventually covered by 50 pounds (22.9kg) of bees. The competition’s winner attracted 57 pounds (26kg) of bees.
Via the BBC (Click through to see the mummified winner).

Photo of the Day: Bee Keeper Lu Kongjiang competes in a “bee-attracting” contest in China’s Hunan province. He was eventually covered by 50 pounds (22.9kg) of bees. The competition’s winner attracted 57 pounds (26kg) of bees.

Via the BBC (Click through to see the mummified winner).

Photo of the Day: Abdulai Yahaya, Agbogbloshie market, Accra, Ghana, 2009-2010 © Pieter Hugo, 2011.
Via the British Journal of Photography:

South African photographer Pieter Hugo’s latest book, Permanent Error, pictures Agbogbloshie, a Ghanaian dumping ground for global electronic waste and home to slum-dwellers willing to endanger their health burning the techno-trash to harvest precious metals. Unlike consumer products of the past, today’s electronic gadgetry is near obsolete within two to three years, creating some 50 million metric tonnes of “e-waste” per year. Much of that techno-trash is sold and recycled in China, Nigeria, India, Vietnam and Ghana.

New phone purchase postponed until another day.
Hugo’s work can be seen here.

Photo of the Day: Abdulai Yahaya, Agbogbloshie market, Accra, Ghana, 2009-2010 © Pieter Hugo, 2011.

Via the British Journal of Photography:

South African photographer Pieter Hugo’s latest book, Permanent Error, pictures Agbogbloshie, a Ghanaian dumping ground for global electronic waste and home to slum-dwellers willing to endanger their health burning the techno-trash to harvest precious metals. Unlike consumer products of the past, today’s electronic gadgetry is near obsolete within two to three years, creating some 50 million metric tonnes of “e-waste” per year. Much of that techno-trash is sold and recycled in China, Nigeria, India, Vietnam and Ghana.

New phone purchase postponed until another day.

Hugo’s work can be seen here.

Photo of the Day: Aerialist Seanna Sharpe staged a performance on a tower of the Williamsburg Bridge Monday night — Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal.
Via the Wall Street Journal:

After a sweltering day in the city, midsummer folly was in the air Monday night. So were two Brooklyn performance artists, who perched 300 feet above traffic on a tower of the Williamsburg Bridge, poised to stage an aerial stunt.
Aerialist Seanna Sharpe and sometime artist and magician Savage Skinner walked onto the bridge just before 7 p.m. Monday evening. Before her ascent, Sharpe said she knew she would leave in handcuffs, but she scaled the tower anyway, giving a brief, daring performance that sent her flipping and flying in the air without the aid of a harness or safety tether.
Sharpe and Skinner’s next trick: Getting out of jail.
New York Police Department officers arrived on the scene thirty minutes after Sharpe, bedecked in a red-and-white leotard and head wrap and Skinner, in a black suit jacket and matching bowler hat, scaled the bridge tower where Sharpe secured 90 feet of silk rope to perform an aerial acrobatic performance.

More about Sharpe can be found at her Web site.

Photo of the Day: Aerialist Seanna Sharpe staged a performance on a tower of the Williamsburg Bridge Monday night — Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal.

Via the Wall Street Journal:

After a sweltering day in the city, midsummer folly was in the air Monday night. So were two Brooklyn performance artists, who perched 300 feet above traffic on a tower of the Williamsburg Bridge, poised to stage an aerial stunt.

Aerialist Seanna Sharpe and sometime artist and magician Savage Skinner walked onto the bridge just before 7 p.m. Monday evening. Before her ascent, Sharpe said she knew she would leave in handcuffs, but she scaled the tower anyway, giving a brief, daring performance that sent her flipping and flying in the air without the aid of a harness or safety tether.

Sharpe and Skinner’s next trick: Getting out of jail.

New York Police Department officers arrived on the scene thirty minutes after Sharpe, bedecked in a red-and-white leotard and head wrap and Skinner, in a black suit jacket and matching bowler hat, scaled the bridge tower where Sharpe secured 90 feet of silk rope to perform an aerial acrobatic performance.

More about Sharpe can be found at her Web site.

Photo of the Day: A Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) soldier stands in line during a rehearsal for the Independence Day ceremony in Juba, on July 5, 2011. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic).
Via the Atlantic:

Last Saturday, the Republic of South Sudan declared its independence, creating the newest nation in the world — the 193rd nation to join the United Nations. The new country has been in the making since a referendum last January, when nearly 4 million southern Sudanese voted to secede from Sudan by a margin of more than 98 percent. The region has been involved in civil wars for at least the past 50 years, and the days-old nation is already battling several armed groups within its new borders. Many issues still remain unresolved — the oil-rich region continues to rely on pipelines that run through Sudan, and a revenue-sharing agreement has not been reached. The new nation, which is comprised of more than 200 ethnic groups, has a largely rural economy, and poverty, civil warfare, and political instability will be the biggest of many challenges for the new administration. Gathered here are scenes from South Sudan as it made its debut on the world stage this weekend.

Check it: 35 images of a newly born nation.

Photo of the Day: A Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) soldier stands in line during a rehearsal for the Independence Day ceremony in Juba, on July 5, 2011. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic).

Via the Atlantic:

Last Saturday, the Republic of South Sudan declared its independence, creating the newest nation in the world — the 193rd nation to join the United Nations. The new country has been in the making since a referendum last January, when nearly 4 million southern Sudanese voted to secede from Sudan by a margin of more than 98 percent. The region has been involved in civil wars for at least the past 50 years, and the days-old nation is already battling several armed groups within its new borders. Many issues still remain unresolved — the oil-rich region continues to rely on pipelines that run through Sudan, and a revenue-sharing agreement has not been reached. The new nation, which is comprised of more than 200 ethnic groups, has a largely rural economy, and poverty, civil warfare, and political instability will be the biggest of many challenges for the new administration. Gathered here are scenes from South Sudan as it made its debut on the world stage this weekend.

Check it: 35 images of a newly born nation.

Drawing inspiration from the Great Depression collaboration between the US Farm Security Administration, photographers and documentarians, the non-profit collective Facing Change teamed up with the Library of Congress to capture America over 4th of July weekend.
Way back when, the FSA sent photographers across the country to document rural poverty and produced some of the most iconic images of that time. Facing Change has similar ambitions.
The Facing Change / Library of Congress collaboration allows the LOC to both archive and publish books based on Facing Change images. In a June press release, the Library wrote:

Facing Change was founded in 2009 by Pulitzer Prize-winning photographers Anthony Suau and Lucian Perkins and is a contemporary counterpart to the work done in the 1930s and 1940s by photographers employed by the Farm Security Administration, a federal project that documented the experiences of Americans at all economic levels during the Great Depression and World War II…
…The collaborative agreement announced today will allow the Library to publish books based on the Facing Change images, which document numerous aspects of contemporary American life through photographs, sound and video files. The Library will begin by exploring born-digital archiving and preservation practices with the Facing Change photographers, building on experience gained through the Library’s National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program.

Last Fall, the New York Times Lens Blog profiled Facing Change, explaining at the time:
Facing Change will pay photographers a day rate and reimburse expenses. Whatever money comes in — from foundations, individuals or the sale of images — will go back into financing more projects, [the organization’s founder Anthony] Suau said. “Nobody is going to get rich,” he said. “We just sincerely believe that it is important to document what’s going on within the country.”
Above: 4th of July celebration at Coney Island Beach by Anthony Suau | Facing Change July 4 Slideshow.

Drawing inspiration from the Great Depression collaboration between the US Farm Security Administration, photographers and documentarians, the non-profit collective Facing Change teamed up with the Library of Congress to capture America over 4th of July weekend.

Way back when, the FSA sent photographers across the country to document rural poverty and produced some of the most iconic images of that time. Facing Change has similar ambitions.

The Facing Change / Library of Congress collaboration allows the LOC to both archive and publish books based on Facing Change images. In a June press release, the Library wrote:

Facing Change was founded in 2009 by Pulitzer Prize-winning photographers Anthony Suau and Lucian Perkins and is a contemporary counterpart to the work done in the 1930s and 1940s by photographers employed by the Farm Security Administration, a federal project that documented the experiences of Americans at all economic levels during the Great Depression and World War II…

…The collaborative agreement announced today will allow the Library to publish books based on the Facing Change images, which document numerous aspects of contemporary American life through photographs, sound and video files. The Library will begin by exploring born-digital archiving and preservation practices with the Facing Change photographers, building on experience gained through the Library’s National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program.

Last Fall, the New York Times Lens Blog profiled Facing Change, explaining at the time:

Facing Change will pay photographers a day rate and reimburse expenses. Whatever money comes in — from foundations, individuals or the sale of images — will go back into financing more projects, [the organization’s founder Anthony] Suau said. “Nobody is going to get rich,” he said. “We just sincerely believe that it is important to document what’s going on within the country.”

Above: 4th of July celebration at Coney Island Beach by Anthony Suau | Facing Change July 4 Slideshow.

Monkey See, Monkey Do
Via The Daily Mail:

To capture the perfect wildlife image, you usually have to be in exactly the right place at precisely the right time.
But in this instance, David Slater wasn’t there at all and he still got a result.
Visiting a national park in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, award-winning photographer Mr Slater left his camera unattended for a while.
It soon attracted the attention of an inquisitive female from a local group of crested black macaque monkeys, known for their intelligence and dexterity.
Fascinated by her reflection in the lens, she then somehow managed to start the camera. The upshot: A splendid self-portrait.

Monkey See, Monkey Do

Via The Daily Mail:

To capture the perfect wildlife image, you usually have to be in exactly the right place at precisely the right time.

But in this instance, David Slater wasn’t there at all and he still got a result.

Visiting a national park in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, award-winning photographer Mr Slater left his camera unattended for a while.

It soon attracted the attention of an inquisitive female from a local group of crested black macaque monkeys, known for their intelligence and dexterity.

Fascinated by her reflection in the lens, she then somehow managed to start the camera. The upshot: A splendid self-portrait.