Posts tagged with ‘poynter’

We must choose completeness over succinctness when tweeting breaking news, especially if it’s complex breaking news that’s easily misunderstood.

Sam Kirkland, New Orgs Could Have Done a Better Job Tweeting Shutdown NewsPoynter.

Yes, yes and yes. Kirkland points to tweets from large media organizations (USA Today, The AP  and The Wall Street Journal) on September 27, which state that the Senate “passed” a bill to avert the government shutdown. He writes: 

Every editor should know how a bill becomes a law — but no editor should assume every reader does. That’s why some of the breaking news tweets before and during the government shutdown were incomplete and potentially misleading.

He points to large media organizations because the reach of their tweets is enormous.

The real story that day — and every day since, until Wednesday — was what House Republicans would agree to. Democrats in the Senate passing a budget bill meant little if it was dead on arrival in the GOP-led House, as the New York Times’ fantastic ongoing back-and-forth graphic showed throughout the shutdown.

So, the all-caps #BREAKING treatment perhaps made the Senate’s move seem more consequential than it really was, especially with wording that could be misconstrued as indicating the Senate’s vote actually meant the shutdown threat was over. Those three tweets weren’t factually wrong, but responses to them indicated at least some confusion from readers.

FJP: It’s an important point. Read the whole article here. Also, related is a piece we wrote a few months ago on how to following breaking news, particularly on Twitter.

Thoughts on Today’s Journalism Education

How necessary is a journalism degree nowadays? Are journalism classrooms innovative enough? Poynter Institute’s News University surveyed more than 1,800 journalism educators, media professionals and students to hear their thoughts. The survey revealed stark differences in the views of educators and professionals:

  • On understanding the value of journalism, 96% of educators and only 57% of professionals believe that a journalism degree is very important to extremely important. 

  • When it comes to learning news gathering skills, more than 80% of educators and only 25% of professionals say a journalism degree is extremely important.

  • While only 39% of educators say journalism education is keeping up with industry changes a little or not at all, 48% of professionals believe the same. 

At a recent conference, Howard Finberg, News University’s director for partnerships and alliances, discussed the divide between the professional and academic journalism worlds.

via Mediashift

Finberg recommends renewing the connection between journalism academics and professionals through innovative changes both within classrooms and in the larger organization of journalism education.

[…] Digital tools could change the focus of faculty members’ classroom time and allow them to share resources with other institutions. Online materials could replace some of the direct instruction in journalism topics, and face-to-face classroom time could be used for other kinds of teaching — as in the widely discussed “flipped classroom” approach.
[…] More radically, Finberg suggests divorcing journalism education from journalism degrees — or at least weakening the connection, so that training in journalism skills can be made more widely available to not only college students, but to the wider public, including those who commit what Jeff Jarvis calls “acts of journalism.” Documenting that training might come through achieving a digital “badge” in journalism — a recognition of knowledge and training in a field that is separate from any degree program, but that can be shown to employers and others to demonstrate ability.

Image: Poynter’s News University, screen grabs of polls on journalism degrees and education.

Study says Journalists are Getting Less Respect

via Poynter

27 percent of Americans say journalists contribute little or nothing to society’s well being, according to a study by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life.

The percentage of Americans who say journalists contribute a lot to society has shrunk since 2009. The trend is particularly notable among women, 29 percent of whom said journalists contribute a lot. In 2009, 46 percent of women held high opinions of journalists.

Images: Polls conducted by Pew Research Center

Initial Reactions from #PoynterEthics
We’re hoping Jihii will write a thought provoking analysis of what she heard, saw and talked about at today’s Poynter symposium on journalism ethics in the digital age.
Meantime, she wrote a note to us this afternoon.
We added some starstruck purples and pinks and blueish hues to it because yes, she is this excited about this stuff.

Initial Reactions from #PoynterEthics

We’re hoping Jihii will write a thought provoking analysis of what she heard, saw and talked about at today’s Poynter symposium on journalism ethics in the digital age.

Meantime, she wrote a note to us this afternoon.

We added some starstruck purples and pinks and blueish hues to it because yes, she is this excited about this stuff.

Get Your Journo Ethics On
The Poynter Institute is running a symposium today in New York on journalism ethics in the digital age. The cast of characters they’ve gathered is impressive.
To follow along: #PoynterEthics is the general hashtag and you can watch the livestream (and follow a Storify) at poynter.org. 
Jihii is posting at @the_FJP. Roberto doing the same in Spanish at @FJP_LatAm. 

Get Your Journo Ethics On

The Poynter Institute is running a symposium today in New York on journalism ethics in the digital age. The cast of characters they’ve gathered is impressive.

To follow along: #PoynterEthics is the general hashtag and you can watch the livestream (and follow a Storify) at poynter.org

Jihii is posting at @the_FJP. Roberto doing the same in Spanish at @FJP_LatAm

TEDx Poynter Livestream
The Poynter Institute is running a TEDx event today with a livestream available online. We missed the morning events but this afternoon’s run as follows:
Session 2: Curation
1:05 p.m. “In Praise of the Humble, Misunderstood Hashtag” — Sree Sreenivasan
1:30 p.m. “The Challenging Transition from Journalism to Entrepreneurship” — Burt Herman
1:55 p.m. “Real-time Curation in Storytelling” — Michelle Royal
 Session 3: Engagement
2:30 p.m. “@TampaBayTraffic: Connecting a Community Around a Shared Complaint” — Meredyth Censullo
2:55 p.m. “Do I Really Need to Learn How to Program?” — Lisa Williams
3:20 p.m. “Addicted to the Like: Ratings and Readership are the Old Metrics” — Elissa Nauful
The livestream is here. If following on Twitter, use the #tedxpoynter hash tag.

TEDx Poynter Livestream

The Poynter Institute is running a TEDx event today with a livestream available online. We missed the morning events but this afternoon’s run as follows:

Session 2: Curation

  • 1:05 p.m. “In Praise of the Humble, Misunderstood Hashtag” — Sree Sreenivasan
  • 1:30 p.m. “The Challenging Transition from Journalism to Entrepreneurship” — Burt Herman
  • 1:55 p.m. “Real-time Curation in Storytelling” — Michelle Royal

Session 3: Engagement

  • 2:30 p.m. “@TampaBayTraffic: Connecting a Community Around a Shared Complaint” — Meredyth Censullo
  • 2:55 p.m. “Do I Really Need to Learn How to Program?” — Lisa Williams
  • 3:20 p.m. “Addicted to the Like: Ratings and Readership are the Old Metrics” — Elissa Nauful

The livestream is here. If following on Twitter, use the #tedxpoynter hash tag.

What’s the Future of Journalism Education?

Related to our last post, I’m sharing this message from Poynter:

Roger Ailes, the Fox News chairman and CEO, in a speech at the University of North Carolina recently, told journalism students they should change their major. “If you’re going into journalism if you care, then you’re going into the wrong profession … I usually ask (journalists) if they want to change the world in the way it wants to be changed,” Ailes said.

Tom Huang, Poynter adjunct faculty member, has a slightly different take: “Actually, you should go into journalism if you want to save the world. My point is that you don’t get to choose the time that you’re called upon to be brave and do your best work. Don’t forget: A time of crisis and change is a time of incredible opportunity,” he wrote for Poynter.org.

What’s your take on this? Whether you are a student, educator or professional, we would like to know what you think about the value of a journalism degree. Poynter’s Howard Finberg, who has been thinking about the future of journalism and journalism education for years, will be giving a talk at the European Journalism Centre on the future of journalism education, and he hopes you’ll fill out a very short [four to five questions only] survey. He’ll share what he learns at AEJMC this summer as well.

FJP: NewsU will give you a 35 percent discount code to any of their Webinars or Webinar Replays for doing so. Feel free to share your thoughts with us too! (@the_fjp)

Super Pacs and Politics, the Spending is Ferocious…

A music video to explain super PAC ads via Propublica.

More: Poynter has the behind-the-scenes on the video. For a more serious explanation of super PACs (though this one is just perfect), we tumbled about it a few weeks ago.

Romenesko Leaves Poynter

Maybe we should just resign ourselves that today is a day of resignation. We’ve talked Steve Jobs, we’ve talked Slate layoffs but now’s the time to talk Jim Romenesko.

For years now he’s curated the news about the news at his eponymous blog at Poynter.org. Literally, the man is a machine. And his curation Fu has been going on for far longer than the rest of us have curated our particular interests.

Via the New York Times:

Mr. Romenesko was a pioneer of a form of online journalism that is now commonplace. Sites like Gawker and Dealbreaker would become popular years later using similar models.

He identified the hunger for niche news, and connected his readers through an online community in which they could debate and comment on the story of the day. And if they had an internal memo they wanted to leak him, all the better. He would post it and guarantee anonymity. His last name became a verb that editors hoped they would never find themselves on the other end of — as in, “You just got Romenesko’d.” That typically meant one of their memos had leaked on his site.

From time to time, this space will serve to mock and highlight the ridiculousness that are lifestyles pieces. After a while, you’ll see that newspapers are just telling us what we already know.

In this article from Poynter, a Twitter account mocks lifestyle pieces — most often — from the New York Times.

H/T: Poynter

(Source: bit.ly)

Is the Internet generation making disposable data obsolete? →

According to Jeff Sonderdam, social layers are the future of social media information. That is, there are more ways for people to use the social media already in place for even more meta purposes such as visualizing your career with Connection Timeline using your LinkedIn profile, Tweetmeme to view trending pages and videos and The Tweeted Times to construct a personalized news product based on the links between you and your friends.

H/T: Poynter

What I Learned at Curation School →

Julie Moos filled in for Jim Romenesko at Poynter.org and writes what she’s learned about content curation. 

Her takeaway includes ideas any Tumblr should know:

  • The balance between the obligatory and the original is critical.
  • What you exclude is as important as what you include.
  • Speed kills, but slowness is a painful death of its own.

Click through to read her explanations of each.

Correction: Moos alerts us through the Twitter that Steve Myers did most of the filling in during Romenesko’s vacation.

Journalists learn what works (& doesn’t work) on Tumblr →

Today we’re going meta with a Tumblr love fest: The Copy Editor writes for Poynter Institute and interviews me, SoupSoup, Producer Matthew, Josh Sternberg and Mark Dodge Medlin:  

As more journalists use Tumblr, they’re starting to see how it can help them engage with users and reach new audiences. For insights, I interviewed journalists via email about what’s working (and not working), and highlighted some of their key takeaways.

Thanks for pulling that together.

The year in media as seen through the top 10 Romenesko posts →

Via ianhillmedia:

From Poynter.org: As 2010 begins to wind down, we’re looking back at the top 10 Romenesko posts to see what happened this year in media.