Posts tagged with ‘press’

Egypt's Military Censors Critics

  • Hossam el-Hamalawy: Any institution of the country that takes taxes from us should be open to question
  • Mahmoud Saad: No, no, no. I will not allow you to say those things on this network.
  • FJP: El-Hamalawy is an Egyptian blogger. Saad a television host. The New York Times reports that the Egyptian military "is pressing the Egyptian news media to censor harsh criticism of it and protect its image. The military’s intervention concerns some human rights advocates who say they are worried that such efforts could make it harder for politicians to scrutinize the military and could possibly undermine attempts to bring it under civilian control or investigate charges of corruption.
England’s regulatory body for the press wants to bring newspaper and reporters’ Twitter feeds under its purview.
According to the Guardian, the Press Complaints Commission “believes that some postings on Twitter are, in effect part of a ‘newspaper’s editorial product’, writings that its code of practice would otherwise cover if the same text appeared in print or on a newspaper website.”

A change in the code would circumvent a loophole that – in theory – means that there is no form of redress via the PCC if somebody wanted to complain about an alleged inaccuracy in a statement that was tweeted…
…Its plan, though, is to distinguish between journalists’ public and private tweets. Any Twitter feed that has the name of the newspaper and is clearly an official feed – such as @telegraphnews or @thesun_bizarre – will almost certainly be regulated.

The Press Complaints Commission is a voluntary organization for dealing with public complaints about England’s news reporting. It was established in the 1990s by England’s newspapers and magazines in order to avoid external, governmental regulation.

England’s regulatory body for the press wants to bring newspaper and reporters’ Twitter feeds under its purview.

According to the Guardian, the Press Complaints Commission “believes that some postings on Twitter are, in effect part of a ‘newspaper’s editorial product’, writings that its code of practice would otherwise cover if the same text appeared in print or on a newspaper website.”

A change in the code would circumvent a loophole that – in theory – means that there is no form of redress via the PCC if somebody wanted to complain about an alleged inaccuracy in a statement that was tweeted…

…Its plan, though, is to distinguish between journalists’ public and private tweets. Any Twitter feed that has the name of the newspaper and is clearly an official feed – such as @telegraphnews or @thesun_bizarre – will almost certainly be regulated.

The Press Complaints Commission is a voluntary organization for dealing with public complaints about England’s news reporting. It was established in the 1990s by England’s newspapers and magazines in order to avoid external, governmental regulation.

Today is World Press Freedom Day.
A live stream from Washington, DC of the day’s events is here.
Image: Internet Censorship by TheLamp via Flickr/Creative Commons.

Today is World Press Freedom Day.

A live stream from Washington, DC of the day’s events is here.

Image: Internet Censorship by TheLamp via Flickr/Creative Commons.

A bad free press is preferable to a technically good, subservient press.

Nelson Mandela, 10th anniversary of the Institute for the Advancement of Journalism in Johannesburg, 2002.

On this day in 1994, Mandela won the presidency of South Africa. He was inaugurated on May 10. 

In the American case, one of the reasons [leakers go to Wikileaks and not US establishment media is that] the legitimacy of the press itself is in doubt in the minds of the leakers.  And there’s good reason for that.  Because while we have what purports to be a “watchdog press,” we also have — laid out in front of us — the clear record of the watchdog press’  failure to do what it says it can do, which is provide a check on power when it tries to conceal its deeds and its purpose.  

So I think it’s a mistake to try to reckon with WikiLeaks and what it’s about without including in the frame the spectacular failures of the watchdog press over the last 10, 20, 30, 40 years - but especially recently.  And so without this legitimacy crisis in mainstream American journalism, the leakers might not be so inclined to trust an upstart like Julian Assange and a shadowly organization like WikiLeaks …  

These kinds of huge, cataclysmic events [the Iraq War] within the legitimacy regime lie in the background of the WikiLeaks case, because if it wasn’t for those things, WikiLeaks wouldn’t have the supporters it has, the leakers wouldn’t collaborate the way they do, and the moral force behind exposing what this Government is doing just wouldn’t be there… The watchdog press died, and what we have is WikiLeaks instead.

— Jay Rosen, Professor, NYU Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute via Glenn Greenwald