Posts tagged with ‘public radio’

Speed-produced Longshot Radio to make its next episode this week with Radiolab, in 48 hours, with everybody
Think improv where you can cry if you want, and where there’s no stage or troupe - just a booth and a microphone. From their camp at the 99% Conference (which doesn’t have anything to do with Occupy Wall Street) theme-based Longshot Radio will release a series of radio pieces on experimentation and the times when risks don’t pan out. And they’ll do it really fast.
There are many ways to become involved from anywhere, all of which are clearly spelled out here.
And seeing as how the show asks passersby to go out on a limb and tell a personal story, we asked executive producer Jody Avirgan to share some of his experiments-gone-wrong, and how he and his friends managed to create something so unique. He told us this:

Certainly at 4am on Sunday last time around, we were questioning the whole endeavor. But, yes, the idea is to not be afraid to try things, and to react to each little failure with a tweak and an adjustment, rather than throwing up your hands. So, there are countless moments where you have a big idea (“we should get people from every country in the world to remix the same radio piece in the next four hours”) that butts up against possible failure. You then adjust, and find other unexpected victories.

Speed-produced Longshot Radio to make its next episode this week with Radiolab, in 48 hours, with everybody

Think improv where you can cry if you want, and where there’s no stage or troupe - just a booth and a microphone. From their camp at the 99% Conference (which doesn’t have anything to do with Occupy Wall Street) theme-based Longshot Radio will release a series of radio pieces on experimentation and the times when risks don’t pan out. And they’ll do it really fast.

There are many ways to become involved from anywhere, all of which are clearly spelled out here.

And seeing as how the show asks passersby to go out on a limb and tell a personal story, we asked executive producer Jody Avirgan to share some of his experiments-gone-wrong, and how he and his friends managed to create something so unique. He told us this:

Certainly at 4am on Sunday last time around, we were questioning the whole endeavor. But, yes, the idea is to not be afraid to try things, and to react to each little failure with a tweak and an adjustment, rather than throwing up your hands. So, there are countless moments where you have a big idea (“we should get people from every country in the world to remix the same radio piece in the next four hours”) that butts up against possible failure. You then adjust, and find other unexpected victories.

A new NPR show debuts today
Fans of radio, TED, and brains (see today’s theme) may enjoy NPR’s latest show, which holds interviews with TED speakers, and gets them to elaborate on their research or passions. It’s called TED Radio Hour.

A new NPR show debuts today

Fans of radio, TED, and brains (see today’s theme) may enjoy NPR’s latest show, which holds interviews with TED speakers, and gets them to elaborate on their research or passions. It’s called TED Radio Hour.

This legislation would ultimately dictate the daily editorial schedules and news programs of nearly one thousand public radio stations across America.

— NPR response to efforts by Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-Colo.) to introduce bills that would cut off funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Public Media Experiments Show Promise, Need to Involve Public →

After a slew of reports, conferences, and hearings, the calls for public media to step into the journalism breach have been met with action. Over the past year, there has been a wave of experimentation in local news projects in public media, a trend that is increasing rapidly, especially at radio stations. As Ken Doctor sums up in this Newsonomics post:

We’ve seen 12 topical sites prominently launched in major cities, under the rubric of Project Argo. We’ve seen National Public Radio building out a state-of-the-art internal wire (the NPR API), facilitating the sharing of national, global and local stories among public radio stations. We’ve seen the Corporation for Public Broadcasting fund various new initiatives, including the Local Journalism Centers, aimed at improving regional issues reporting. We’ve seen Boston’s WBUR, the Bay Area’s KQED, the Twin Cities’s MPRNews.org and L.A.’s KPCC all launch standalone news sites over the last year, moving beyond the programming brochure look that has long characterized public radio on the web.

These projects are just the start. They are matched by ambitious proposals to ramp up stations’ reporting capacity, such as Bill Kling’s push to add over 300 new reporters to local public radio newsrooms, and NPR’s new Impact of Government initiative, which will add reporters to cover state governments in all 50 states.

What if Hyperlocal and Digital Literacy Clash?

Philadelphia’s WHYY Radio is launching a local news portal next week. Called NewsWorks, the site is being described as “everything you love about NPR, only on the Web, and about Philly.” Christopher Ali, a doctoral student at the Annenberg School of Communication talks with Chris Satullo, WHYY’s Executive Director of News and Civic Dialogue, about the challenges facing Newsworks:

Digital access and literacy among users are the other major challenges, ones that are experienced by all organizations wanting to launch an online news platform for a community as socio-economically diverse as Philadelphia. This divide was illustrated by one of WHYY’s community forums held at a community digital media center. Here, one room featured WHYY proselytizing the value of NewsWorks, while in another room, community members were attending a regularly-scheduled class on how to use e-mail.

While Satullo said that this is definitely a concern, he adds that this is a concern that is at some points overstated.

— via the Center for Social Media.