posts about or somewhat related to ‘pulitzer’

Happy Birthday, Joseph Pulitzer!
Today in 1847, the legendary Joseph P. was born. He’s also the namesake of Columbia J-school and we’re getting cupcakes on his behalf today, so here’s a nod, a smile, and a question in his direction.—Jihii
Q: How does the half-Jewish, half-Roman Catholic man from Hungary behind yellow journalism get to be remembered as the father of great American journalism and a great American journalism school?
A: His contributions outweigh his slip-ups, he was incredibly enterprising, and he got a lot of things done. 
For starters, he wanted to be in army but was rejected on account of his sickliness till he met a bounty recruiter for the US Union Army, enlisted in the Lincoln Cavalry for a year, then worked his way to St. Louis as a muleteer, baggage handler, and waiter. His journalism career began with a job at a German language daily, and some significant hops, skips and jumps later (including ownership of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch), he bought the The New York World, which was in dire financial states. The yellow journalism period came into full play during a four month long circulation battle with William Randolph Hearst’s Journal. 
Pulitzer.org:

In the view of historians, Pulitzer’s lapse into “yellow journalism” was outweighed by his public service achievements. He waged courageous and often successful crusades against corrupt practices in government and business. He was responsible to a large extent for passage of antitrust legislation and regulation of the insurance industry.

Notable accomplishments include tremendous improvements in circulation of both the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and The New York World, innovations such as the first extensive use of illustrations in the paper, exposing tremendous corruption, crazy news stunts (such as the time he raised public subscriptions for the building of a pedestal at the entrance to the New York Harbor for the Statue of Liberty to be emplaced), and of course, Columbia J-school and the Pulitzer Prizes.
Read his full bio here.
Image: via Kenmore Stamp Company.

Happy Birthday, Joseph Pulitzer!

Today in 1847, the legendary Joseph P. was born. He’s also the namesake of Columbia J-school and we’re getting cupcakes on his behalf today, so here’s a nod, a smile, and a question in his direction.—Jihii

Q: How does the half-Jewish, half-Roman Catholic man from Hungary behind yellow journalism get to be remembered as the father of great American journalism and a great American journalism school?

A: His contributions outweigh his slip-ups, he was incredibly enterprising, and he got a lot of things done. 

For starters, he wanted to be in army but was rejected on account of his sickliness till he met a bounty recruiter for the US Union Army, enlisted in the Lincoln Cavalry for a year, then worked his way to St. Louis as a muleteer, baggage handler, and waiter. His journalism career began with a job at a German language daily, and some significant hops, skips and jumps later (including ownership of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch), he bought the The New York World, which was in dire financial states. The yellow journalism period came into full play during a four month long circulation battle with William Randolph Hearst’s Journal. 

Pulitzer.org:

In the view of historians, Pulitzer’s lapse into “yellow journalism” was outweighed by his public service achievements. He waged courageous and often successful crusades against corrupt practices in government and business. He was responsible to a large extent for passage of antitrust legislation and regulation of the insurance industry.

Notable accomplishments include tremendous improvements in circulation of both the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and The New York World, innovations such as the first extensive use of illustrations in the paper, exposing tremendous corruption, crazy news stunts (such as the time he raised public subscriptions for the building of a pedestal at the entrance to the New York Harbor for the Statue of Liberty to be emplaced), and of course, Columbia J-school and the Pulitzer Prizes.

Read his full bio here.

Image: via Kenmore Stamp Company.

Details from Pulitzer Prize Winning Photographs

We spent the weekend in Washington, DC and while there visited the Newseum. A favorite exhibit was the Pulitzer Prize Photographs Gallery

Above are small details from a select group of past winners.

This decontextualizes the original compositions although I’m not sure in a good, bad or neutral way. Just different. — Michael

Select any to embiggen.

Massoud Hossaini won the Pulitzer Prize in Breaking News Photography for this photograph that appeared in newspapers around the world last December.
The image is from the aftermath of a suicide attack at shrine in Kabul attended by Shiites taking part in a religious ceremony.
Via the New York Times Lens Blog, which spoke to Hossaini in December after publishing the photo:

“Women were asking me, ‘Help, help, help,’” Mr. Hossaini said. “I couldn’t. I was recording and I was taking pictures.” One of the women who was holding a baby, called out for help — her other child had died. Another man lifted the child from the ground. But blood was pouring from its head. The man placed the child back on the ground and walked away.
As Mr. Hossaini photographed, he realized he was weeping. When he looked down, he realized how badly his own hand was bleeding. He wrapped it with the cleanest piece of material he could find.

Hossaini works for Agence France-Presse. It is the organization’s first Pulitzer.

Massoud Hossaini won the Pulitzer Prize in Breaking News Photography for this photograph that appeared in newspapers around the world last December.

The image is from the aftermath of a suicide attack at shrine in Kabul attended by Shiites taking part in a religious ceremony.

Via the New York Times Lens Blog, which spoke to Hossaini in December after publishing the photo:

“Women were asking me, ‘Help, help, help,’” Mr. Hossaini said. “I couldn’t. I was recording and I was taking pictures.” One of the women who was holding a baby, called out for help — her other child had died. Another man lifted the child from the ground. But blood was pouring from its head. The man placed the child back on the ground and walked away.

As Mr. Hossaini photographed, he realized he was weeping. When he looked down, he realized how badly his own hand was bleeding. He wrapped it with the cleanest piece of material he could find.

Hossaini works for Agence France-Presse. It is the organization’s first Pulitzer.

Huffington Post Wins Pulitzer →

The Huffington Post’s David Wood won a Pulitzer for national reporting for a 10-part series called Beyond the Battlefield that explores the challenges Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans face after a decade of war.

HuffPo is the first online daily to win a Pulitzer.

Via Mashable:

The award may be Wood’s, but Huffington Post cofounder Arianna Huffington is a clear beneficiary. Over the past few years, Huffington has made a point of hiring experienced, well-known and (no doubt) expensive reporters like Wood.

The hirings are part of an effort to position the Huffington Post as a serious news organization — not, as former New York Times executive editor Bill Keller has described it, as an “overaggregator” of “celebrity gossip, adorable kitten videos, posts from unpaid bloggers and news reports from other publications… [with] a left-wing soundtrack.”

The complete list of winners is available at Pulitzer.org.