Posts tagged with ‘questions’

Tumblr Question
The FJP is a group Tumblr and for the longest time it’s frustrated me that we either can’t, or I haven’t figured out how, to see the rest of a response someone makes when replying to one of our posts.
Maybe it’s a Group Blog thing, maybe its me not figuring out the right keystroke, but gotta ask: how do you see a Reply in its entirety?
And while I’m at it, why can’t you reply back and carry on a conversation?
Inquiring minds want to know. 
Oh, and since I won’t be able to see a complete Reply, tips and tricks will be appreciated through the Ask box. — Michael
UPDATE: One person says the complete reply comes in through your notes. Unfortunately, not on a group blog.

Tumblr Question

The FJP is a group Tumblr and for the longest time it’s frustrated me that we either can’t, or I haven’t figured out how, to see the rest of a response someone makes when replying to one of our posts.

Maybe it’s a Group Blog thing, maybe its me not figuring out the right keystroke, but gotta ask: how do you see a Reply in its entirety?

And while I’m at it, why can’t you reply back and carry on a conversation?

Inquiring minds want to know. 

Oh, and since I won’t be able to see a complete Reply, tips and tricks will be appreciated through the Ask box— Michael

UPDATE: One person says the complete reply comes in through your notes. Unfortunately, not on a group blog.

A Garage Band for E-Books? So Many Questions →

Word on the street is that Apple will announce something along the lines of a “Garage Band for e-Books" this Thursday. That is, a drop dead simple way to create, package and digitally publish books.

At Nieman Journalism Lab, Joshua Benton thinks this could lead to a tremendous content explosion similar to what happened when blogging platforms appeared in the early 2000s. 

Sill, he asks

Will ease of ebook authoring come with greater ease of ebook publishing?

Will there be an iBooks for Android?

Will this new tool publish in multiple formats or simply create iBooks?

If ebook publishing really does become super easy, how should news publishers fit it into their workflows?

Click through to read his thoughts on each of these questions.

The degree of difficulty in the questions coming in just hit 11.
Anyone have something easier? Like, say, what I might eat for brunch tomorrow?
Love it, and ask away. — Michael

The degree of difficulty in the questions coming in just hit 11.

Anyone have something easier? Like, say, what I might eat for brunch tomorrow?

Love it, and ask away. — Michael

New York Times journalists to hold ‘office hours’ on Quora

Three New York Times journalists are using the question-and-answer site Quora to engage with readers about their recently published books, Times Associate Managing Editor Jim Schachter wrote today. Schachter also said in the comments that this is a test. He followed up by email to say “We’ll have to see how it goes before we would even think about embedding Quora onNYTimes.com.” The series kicks off tomorrow with Diana Henriques answering questions from 3 to 4 p.m. EST about her Bernie Madoff book “Wizard of Lies.” Gretchen Morgenson and Adam Bryant will follow in the coming weeks. 

via Poynter

Colors Can Be Fun

Sometimes we go green on green.

chrislindsay answered your question: Via the Guardian: The underground world of…

who chose the blue graphic on top of the blue background?

A Great Recap of the panel discussion titled “The Future of Media, Publishing, and Paid Content” at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism →

On Tuesday night, New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. and New York Times Company president and CEO Janet Robinson spoke at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism in a panel discussion titled “The Future of Media, Publishing, and Paid Content.”

CJR article by Lauren Kirchner

People raised great questions about the NYT paywall.

The title was perhaps a bit too grand, as the discussion, not surprisingly, mainly focused on the Times’s new subscription strategy. (“Don’t call it a ‘paywall!’” moderator Bill Grueskin, Dean of Academic Affairs, kept reminding himself aloud throughout the conversation.)

The first questions were about how the Times staff went about structuring the digital subscription plan, and what kinds of factors went into its pricing. For instance, Bill Grueskin noted, some have wondered whether the relatively high price of online access is meant to encourage more readers to subscribe to home delivery, which would in turn bring the Times more print ad revenue from the increased circulation numbers.

Click here to read more.