Posts tagged quotes

Good Afternoon, 2014

The She Works: Note to Self Tumblr is an NPR creation that’s part of The Changing Lives of Women series. Advice that’s helped you at work, to women, from women.
You can create your own note card and print it out, if you like. Pictured above is a quote a lovely working lady once shared with me. Wise words, especially for entrepreneurial women. Lady journos, get on this. —Jihii 

The She Works: Note to Self Tumblr is an NPR creation that’s part of The Changing Lives of Women series. Advice that’s helped you at work, to women, from women.

You can create your own note card and print it out, if you like. Pictured above is a quote a lovely working lady once shared with me. Wise words, especially for entrepreneurial women. Lady journos, get on this. —Jihii 

Waiting on Perfection
See the Slate series, Daily Rituals: Life Hacking Tips from Novelists, Painters and Filmmakers.
For example:

[P]erhaps the single best piece of advice I can offer to anyone trying to do creative work is to ignore inspiration.
This idea comes up over and over again in the book. William Faulkner: “I write when the spirit moves me, and the spirit moves me every day.” George Balanchine: “My muse must come to me on union time.” Chuck Close: “Inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work.” John Updike: “I’ve never believed that one should wait until one is inspired because I think that the pleasures of not writing are so great that if you ever start indulging them you will never write again.” George Gershwin said that if he waited for inspiration, he would compose at most three songs a year.

All very true. All very hard to learn.

Waiting on Perfection

See the Slate series, Daily Rituals: Life Hacking Tips from Novelists, Painters and Filmmakers.

For example:

[P]erhaps the single best piece of advice I can offer to anyone trying to do creative work is to ignore inspiration.

This idea comes up over and over again in the book. William Faulkner: “I write when the spirit moves me, and the spirit moves me every day.” George Balanchine: “My muse must come to me on union time.” Chuck Close: “Inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work.” John Updike: “I’ve never believed that one should wait until one is inspired because I think that the pleasures of not writing are so great that if you ever start indulging them you will never write again.” George Gershwin said that if he waited for inspiration, he would compose at most three songs a year.

All very true. All very hard to learn.

Happy 94th Birthday, Nelson Mandela!

Visit the Nelson Mandela digital archives.

Images: Selected quotes. Choose any to embiggen.

Letting Sources Approve Quotes?

via Poynter:

New York Times reporter Jeremy Peters pulled back the curtain on political reporting Monday, revealing that many reporters now allow sources with the presidential campaigns to approve the quotes that will appear in their stories. He wrote that “it was difficult to find a news outlet that had not agreed to quote approval, albeit reluctantly.”

Here’s one: The Associated Press. “We don’t permit quote approval,” AP spokesman Paul Colford told me by email. “We have declined interviews that have come with this contingency.” That puts the AP in agreement with 58 percent of the people who said in our Twitter pollthat they never let sources review quotes. (The poll is totally unscientific and should be taken with the grain of salt that you normally apply to Twitter.)

Peters wrote that “quotations come back redacted, stripped of colorful metaphors, colloquial language and anything even mildly provocative.” Among the news outlets that have agreed to such terms: Bloomberg, The Washington Post, Vanity Fair, Reuters and The New York Times.

“We don’t like the practice,” said Dean Baquet, managing editor for news at The New York Times. “We encourage our reporters to push back. Unfortunately this practice is becoming increasingly common, and maybe we have to push back harder.”

FJP: ..maybe.

Nothing travels faster than light, with the possible exception of bad news, which follows its own rules.
Douglas Adams, Mostly Harmless.

Quoting Ray Bradbury (1920-2012), who passed away on Tuesday, at 91-years-old. He wasn’t one for technology and perhaps not electronic tributes either.

But here’s ours anyway. 

Quotes via GoodReads. Click pictures to embiggen.

How to Decide What is Public/Private on Twitter & Facebook.

Another internet ethics question. What’s acceptable to publish when sourcing information from social media networks that wasn’t originally intended for publication? 

via Poynter:

Most journalists agree that Twitter is inherently public, and anything said on Twitter is generally fair game to be reported upon. This is evident with the rise in popularity of tools like Storify, which allows reporters to aggregate public tweets around a breaking news event or other story.

Public tweets seem to be fair game. That’s the point of Twitter, after all. Anything shared privately should require asking the person to go on record.

One professor, however, worries about the risk of bad journalism from pulling tweets out of context. Jacqui Banaszynski, a professor of journalism at the University of Missouri and editing fellow at Poynter, says:

If I’m going to quote someone, the smart journalistic thing to do is to be in touch with that person beyond what you pulled off that site. Journalists should let people know when they’re performing journalism. I also think that pulling something off a site without contacting [a] person further doesn’t allow the journalist to do deeper reporting or put the comment in context. It’s very easy to take just 140 characters out of context – and that’s bad journalism.

Facebook is a bit more tricky. Because its privacy options are so complicated, users don’t always realize their profile or comments are public. Banaszynski thinks:

If it’s a public fan page, I have no problem looking at that and pulling from that. But if it’s a post between friends, I would hope a good journalist would contact the person, verify their identity and let them know they are using that info.

Until standards are set across the industry, Poynter suggests considering the following questions when deciding what’s fair game to publish:

  • What was the author’s intent? If shared in a closed group or personal profile, was it intended to be kept private?
  • How did the source respond when you asked about including the information in a story?
  • Is the author a public figure? How public? There is a difference between a school principal and a professional athlete.
  • What harm could come to the individual if the information is made public? Is that harm justified by the public benefit of the information?
  • What alternatives do you have for getting similar information? 

FJP: Good Questions. 

Christopher Hitchens on journalism, media… and how earth was populated.

Click to embiggen.

Quoting Steve Jobs. We Will Miss You. Be Well.

Quotes gathered via the Wall Street Journal and Wired.

Select thumbnails to view.

Background on Steve Jobs stepping down as Apple CEO.

A bad free press is preferable to a technically good, subservient press.

Nelson Mandela, 10th anniversary of the Institute for the Advancement of Journalism in Johannesburg, 2002.

On this day in 1994, Mandela won the presidency of South Africa. He was inaugurated on May 10. 

Statistics are like a bikini. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.