Posts tagged with ‘reading’

Happy Teen Literature Day
As libraries across America celebrate Teen Lit Day, Readergirlz and some co-sponsors are hosting Operation Teen Bookdrop, which you can participate in too:

* Follow @readergirlz on Twitter and tweet #rockthedrop* Print a copy of the bookplate and insert it into a book (or 10!) On April 18th, drop a book in a public spot (park bench, bus seat, restaurant counter?) Lucky finders will see that the book is part of ROCK THE DROP! (If you think people won’t pick up the book, slap a Post-It or note on the front cover that reads, “Take this book - IT’S FREE!” Bonus points for using recycled paper and/or making your own funky design!)* Post the banner at your blog and social networks. Proclaim that you will ROCK THE DROP! * Snap a photo of your drop and post it at the readergirlz Facebook page. Then tweet the drop at #rockthedropwith all the other lovers of YA books.

See books that people have been dropping all day via the Twitter hashtag #rockthedrop.
Bonus: Our (well, Jihii’s) favorite teen fiction? Everything by Sarah Dessen but especially this and this.

Happy Teen Literature Day

As libraries across America celebrate Teen Lit Day, Readergirlz and some co-sponsors are hosting Operation Teen Bookdrop, which you can participate in too:

* Follow @readergirlz on Twitter and tweet #rockthedrop
Print a copy of the bookplate and insert it into a book (or 10!) On April 18th, drop a book in a public spot (park bench, bus seat, restaurant counter?) Lucky finders will see that the book is part of ROCK THE DROP! 
(If you think people won’t pick up the book, slap a Post-It or note on the front cover that reads, “Take this book - IT’S FREE!” Bonus points for using recycled paper and/or making your own funky design!)
Post the banner at your blog and social networks. Proclaim that you will ROCK THE DROP! 
Snap a photo of your drop and post it at the readergirlz Facebook page. Then tweet the drop at #rockthedropwith all the other lovers of YA books.

See books that people have been dropping all day via the Twitter hashtag #rockthedrop.

Bonus: Our (well, Jihii’s) favorite teen fiction? Everything by Sarah Dessen but especially this and this.

We need news organizations to help our curiosity by signaling how their stories fit into the larger themes on which a sincere capacity for interest depends. To grow interested in any piece of information, we need somewhere to “put” it, which means some way of connecting it to an issue we already know how to care about. A section of the human brain might be pictured as a library in which information is shelved under certain fundamental categories. Most of what we hear about day to day easily signals where in the stacks it should go and gets immediately and unconsciously filed: News of an affair is put on the heavily burdened shelf dedicated to How Relationships Work, a story of the sudden sacking of a CEO slots into our evolving understanding of Work & Status.

But the stranger or the smaller stories become, the harder the shelving process grows. What we colloquially call “feeling bored” is just the mind, acting out of a self-preserving reflex, ejecting information it has despaired of knowing where to place.

Alain de Botton, The Future of News, The Week.

The piece is an excerpt from his new book The News: A User’s Manual, which we’re currently reading and will have thoughts to tumble about soon. In the meantime, it’s an important conversation to have. Here’s a take on some key points from a review in The Guardian:

These are all worthy areas, to be sure. They are what intelligent, concerned citizens ought to want to know about the world that surrounds them. Perhaps, two centuries ago, the general populace could manage without The News most of the time. But now it’s omnipresent, inescapable and, on this thesis, stuck in too many arcane ruts, pandering to fear and pessimism, relishing disappointment.

Yet you can’t make the whole journey merely by playing the dissatisfied consumer. 

[…] News starts with you, your family, your interests, your street. It expands via TV, captured by the people and lives you see on screen. (It was more interested in foreign coverage when it seemed the cold war could destroy us all at the push of a button). It is a box of fragments you try to assemble for yourself, rather than a finished jigsaw. Which means that it can’t be pinned down in a handy user’s guide. But at least it’s worth thinking about constantly, fine, frisky, philosophical minds applied. For the construct is you.

Offer a Story: What Would You Do to Keep Reading?
Damien Spleeters, currently a student at Columbia’s J-School, is experimenting with new ways of sharing stories online. Here we have: The Offer a Story Project.
How It Works: Read a lede, decide if you like it, pay for the rest of the story with 1 tweet or 1 dollar, in bitcoins. 
He explains:

The micro paywall is quite flexible. Launched by BitMonet, it’s embeddable with a simple html code, and its features are customizable. You can offer one article, one hour of access, or a one-day pass. People pay with bitcoins, or just with a tweet. The more you share, the more you have access to. A bit like the reversed paywall introduced by Jeff Jarvis.
The story itself is hosted on marquee. A platform showcased during the Tow Center conference on the future of digital long form journalism a few days ago.


Immediate Thoughts: 1) If you care about what you tweet, do you really want to share a story before reading it? Scaled, how much noise does that add to the Twitterverse? 2) A dollar in bitcoins is nerdly cool, but how frictionless is the payment process for the non-bitcoin majority of the world? 3) This could encourage headline skimmers (and not your typical longform reader) to get enticed into a story through the lede, without yet knowing how long the story is and that they don’t want to read it right now. And by then you’ve “paid” so you might as well stay. Potential.
Try it out here. Give him feedback here.
Image: Screenshot from the first story on the site.

Offer a Story: What Would You Do to Keep Reading?

Damien Spleeters, currently a student at Columbia’s J-School, is experimenting with new ways of sharing stories online. Here we have: The Offer a Story Project.

How It Works: Read a lede, decide if you like it, pay for the rest of the story with 1 tweet or 1 dollar, in bitcoins. 

He explains:

The micro paywall is quite flexible. Launched by BitMonet, it’s embeddable with a simple html code, and its features are customizable. You can offer one article, one hour of access, or a one-day pass. People pay with bitcoins, or just with a tweet. The more you share, the more you have access to. A bit like the reversed paywall introduced by Jeff Jarvis.

The story itself is hosted on marquee. A platform showcased during the Tow Center conference on the future of digital long form journalism a few days ago.

Immediate Thoughts: 1) If you care about what you tweet, do you really want to share a story before reading it? Scaled, how much noise does that add to the Twitterverse? 2) A dollar in bitcoins is nerdly cool, but how frictionless is the payment process for the non-bitcoin majority of the world? 3) This could encourage headline skimmers (and not your typical longform reader) to get enticed into a story through the lede, without yet knowing how long the story is and that they don’t want to read it right now. And by then you’ve “paid” so you might as well stay. Potential.

Try it out here. Give him feedback here.

Image: Screenshot from the first story on the site.

Design Firm Creates a ‘Reading Net’ For Library-Loving Minors 

Spain’s Playoffice, a child-centric design firm, created the “reading net" in an attempt to making reading more fun for kids. The "reading net" stretches across the length of a library room, and kids can play on it in between chapters. 

Images: PlayOffice

What’s it Like to Be Dyslexic?

UK-based designer Sam Barclay is concluding a successful Kickstarter campaign to create a design and typography book that shows what it’s like to be dyslexic.

Via the Daily Mail.

According to Barclay, people with dyslexia and other reading difficulties are often capable of thinking in ways others aren’t and as a result are ‘capable of true greatness’, yet these people are often misunderstood and treated unfairly as a result.

‘Being dyslexic, I noticed that available help was always about making me read better,’ said Barclay.

Very little effort was made to help the people around me understand what it feels like.

The book continues a project Barklay created while at the University of Portsmouth that explores the “struggles a dyslexic person might have while reading.”

As Medical Daily explains, the typography book builds empathy with those who don’t — or can’t — understand how the dyslexic see the written world. “It’s near impossible, for instance, to look at a word in your native tongue and not read it, to just look at the symbols, estranged from their meaning. Once we learn to read, our brains forget what it’s like not to associate symbols with letters. It’s for this reason, Barclay says, that his book is so vital to uplifting and enlarging dyslexia to people worldwide.”

Images: Pages from I Wonder What It’s Like to Be Dyslexic, by Sam Barclay via Kickstarter. Select to embiggen.

New Device Makes It Easy to Read and Run Simultaneously 

Do you wish you could actually read your werewolf erotica novel while running instead of listening to the audiobook version? Now you can.

Weartrons, a group of developers based in New York, have created Run-n-Read — a clip-on device that monitors the 3D motions of your body while you run, making it possible for you to easily read whatever text is on your tablet. According to the developers, algorithms with a screen refresh rate of 60 frames per second move the text to match what your eyes are seeing, providing a “seamless reading experience akin to being at rest.” 

The device is currently in the crowd funding process with backing levels ranging from $40 to $500

Video: Weartrons

How We Read our Newspapers
fotojournalismus:

A man reads a newspaper inside a dilapidated baby’s crib along a street in downtown Manila, Philippines on April 10, 2013.
[Credit : Aaron Favila/AP]

FJP: I personally spread it out over the kitchen table but this works. — Michael

How We Read our Newspapers

fotojournalismus:

A man reads a newspaper inside a dilapidated baby’s crib along a street in downtown Manila, Philippines on April 10, 2013.

[Credit : Aaron Favila/AP]

FJP: I personally spread it out over the kitchen table but this works. — Michael

100 Great Nonfiction Books
One of my New Year’s resolutions isn’t necessarily to read more, but to read more books. Happily, the Electronic Typewriter’s put together a list to help get me started with categories ranging from science to memoir to politics to art and beyond.
Bookmarked. — Michael

100 Great Nonfiction Books

One of my New Year’s resolutions isn’t necessarily to read more, but to read more books. Happily, the Electronic Typewriter’s put together a list to help get me started with categories ranging from science to memoir to politics to art and beyond.

Bookmarked. — Michael

A Library Grows in Manila
Via the BBC:

If you put all the books you own on the street outside your house, you might expect them to disappear in a trice. But one man in Manila tried it - and found that his collection grew.
Hernando Guanlao is a sprightly man in his early 60s, with one abiding passion - books.
They’re his pride and joy, which is just as well because, whether he likes it or not, they seem to be taking over his house.
Guanlao, known by his nickname Nanie, has set up an informal library outside his home in central Manila, to encourage his local community to share his joy of reading.
The idea is simple. Readers can take as many books as they want, for as long as they want - even permanently. As Guanlao says: “The only rule is that there are no rules.”
It’s a policy you might assume would end very quickly - with Guanlao having no books at all.
But in fact, in the 12 years he’s been running his library - or, in his words, his book club - he’s found that his collection has grown rather than diminished, as more and more people donate to the cause.
"It seems to me that the books are speaking to me. That’s why it multiplies like that," he says with a smile. "The books are telling me they want to be read… they want to be passed around."

BBC, The man who turned his home into a public library.

A Library Grows in Manila

Via the BBC:

If you put all the books you own on the street outside your house, you might expect them to disappear in a trice. But one man in Manila tried it - and found that his collection grew.

Hernando Guanlao is a sprightly man in his early 60s, with one abiding passion - books.

They’re his pride and joy, which is just as well because, whether he likes it or not, they seem to be taking over his house.

Guanlao, known by his nickname Nanie, has set up an informal library outside his home in central Manila, to encourage his local community to share his joy of reading.

The idea is simple. Readers can take as many books as they want, for as long as they want - even permanently. As Guanlao says: “The only rule is that there are no rules.”

It’s a policy you might assume would end very quickly - with Guanlao having no books at all.

But in fact, in the 12 years he’s been running his library - or, in his words, his book club - he’s found that his collection has grown rather than diminished, as more and more people donate to the cause.

"It seems to me that the books are speaking to me. That’s why it multiplies like that," he says with a smile. "The books are telling me they want to be read… they want to be passed around."

BBC, The man who turned his home into a public library.

[R]eading is socially accepted disassociation. You flip a switch and you’re not there anymore. It’s better than heroin. More effective and cheaper and legal.

— Mary Karr, author, to the Paris Review. The Art of Memoir No. 1.

Over at the Columbia Journalism Review, Ryan Chittum writes about the ethics of social news apps.
In particular, he notes that while there’s much we may want to share, most people don’t understand the extent of what we share. For example, one partner in a relationship reading an article about breaking up that then appears in his or her Facebook timeline.
Facebook calls this frictionless sharing.
Chittum believes that publishers need to be more transparent about what their Facebook apps are going to do and share. Using the highly successful Washington Post app as an example, he writes:

The tagline [to the app] is “share what you read with your friends!”, which sounds innocent and useful enough. I like to share links to stories I think other people should read. Up high it says, “Okay, Read Article,” and when you push that button, it installs the app. There’s nothing telling you directly that you’re installing an app. A box in the bottom corner says “This app may post on your behalf, including articles you read, people you liked and more,” but how many people actually read that?…
…Not only does this stuff show up in my news feed several times a day (Yahoo’s app is also a frequent offender), but you can also go in there and click on your friends who have the app to see what they’ve read. The history goes back months. Jeff Bercovici reported back in the fall that even if you set the Post’s Social Reader to not let anyone see what you’ve read, friends can still go in and see what you’ve read. That’s egregious.

The solution, of course, comes back to the reader. First, monitor your app settings. Although, the Bercovici article gives pause as to whether that would even work. Second, contact publications about their apps and the concerns you have with them.
Ryan Chittum, Columbia Journalism Review. The Ethics of Social News Apps.

Over at the Columbia Journalism Review, Ryan Chittum writes about the ethics of social news apps.

In particular, he notes that while there’s much we may want to share, most people don’t understand the extent of what we share. For example, one partner in a relationship reading an article about breaking up that then appears in his or her Facebook timeline.

Facebook calls this frictionless sharing.

Chittum believes that publishers need to be more transparent about what their Facebook apps are going to do and share. Using the highly successful Washington Post app as an example, he writes:

The tagline [to the app] is “share what you read with your friends!”, which sounds innocent and useful enough. I like to share links to stories I think other people should read. Up high it says, “Okay, Read Article,” and when you push that button, it installs the app. There’s nothing telling you directly that you’re installing an app. A box in the bottom corner says “This app may post on your behalf, including articles you read, people you liked and more,” but how many people actually read that?…

…Not only does this stuff show up in my news feed several times a day (Yahoo’s app is also a frequent offender), but you can also go in there and click on your friends who have the app to see what they’ve read. The history goes back months. Jeff Bercovici reported back in the fall that even if you set the Post’s Social Reader to not let anyone see what you’ve read, friends can still go in and see what you’ve read. That’s egregious.

The solution, of course, comes back to the reader. First, monitor your app settings. Although, the Bercovici article gives pause as to whether that would even work. Second, contact publications about their apps and the concerns you have with them.

Ryan Chittum, Columbia Journalism Review. The Ethics of Social News Apps.

Underground New York Public Library is an awesome new Tumblr featuring photos of people reading while they wait for the subway. The arresting photos speak for themselves.
Long train commutes make New York one of the most literary cities in the U.S. And because New York as one of the fashion capitals of the world,  you have all the ingredients you need for one very stylish documentary project.
H/T: In Other News

Underground New York Public Library is an awesome new Tumblr featuring photos of people reading while they wait for the subway. The arresting photos speak for themselves.

Long train commutes make New York one of the most literary cities in the U.S. And because New York as one of the fashion capitals of the world,  you have all the ingredients you need for one very stylish documentary project.

H/T: In Other News

CMRUBINWORLDAUTHOR: How Will We Read: Newspapers? →

cmrubinworld:


“Nothing replaces a good editor, and I would add, a good visual editor, creating the news for the reader so that it makes enjoyable and interesting reading.” — Francois Dufour

There are many more ways to read news material these days, thanks to the Internet. The Internet makes news easy to…

Could a new generation, raised on print newspapers from childhood, be the key to saving print media? I hope you’ll read this fascinating interview with Francois Dufour, the editor and chief and co-founder of Play Bac, publishers of Mon Quotidien, the first daily print newspaper for kids. The aim is to get kids to read for 10 minutes per day.

Delivered six times per week with the mail, the three age-targeted dailies have 150,000 subscribers and 2 million readers in France.

Kids love them because the content is not adult news explained to kids! It is news a nine or 12 or 15 year-old is interested in. We seldom feature an article on the same day it is published in adult news. One exception was the day bin Laden was killed. Also, I think kids like the fact that our papers are short (four to eight pages long). Our papers are also very visual. Finally, the journalism in our newspapers is serious. It is not childish.

While the newspaper has been downloadable for more than one year, Dufour says that only about 150 people per day read the app version of the publication.

Full Story…

Kindle + Library Card = Free Books

Amazon announced today that Kindle and Kindle app users can now check out electronic books from 11 thousand local libraries around the United States.

You know, like we do with analog books. Except this time you receive the book via WiFi or USB.

Unlike analog books you can make margin notes and highlights and librarians won’t give you the stink eye for doing so.

Visit your local library’s Web site to see if it’s participating in the program.