posts about or somewhat related to ‘regret the error’

When Retractions go Viral →

While not as often as we’d like, news organizations often issue general factual corrections — and occasional outright retractions — to the stories they produce.

The problem, few actually see them and the original error is passed about the online wilds.

Not so with Mike Daisey’s This American Life investigation of electronics manufacturing giant Foxconn. Nieman Lab reports that the TAL episode dedicated to retracting the story is its most popular yet with with over 891,000 downloads and streams of the podcast since the story first aired.

The original Foxconn podcast had 888,000 downloads and streams in a similar timeframe. Since that time and additional 206,000 have listened to it.

Goes to show that biggie errors deserve a biggie response. In this American American Life’s case they dedicated a whole show to their errors. Something to learn from as most outlets bury their mistakes where few actually find them.

Nieman Lab, This American Life’s retraction of the Mike Daisey story set an online listening record.

Correcting Errors Via Twitter
That misinformation can spread at lightning speed across social networks is a contemporary fact of life. News organizations — and those that watch them — have long tried to figure out how to correct errors post-publishing in a world where an initial misguided tweet takes on a life of its own in a spiral of retweets.
Paul Bradshaw of the Online Journalism Blog wrestled up an interesting hack to address the issue. After seeing reports that News of the World could destroy incriminating evidence against it once it shut down, he created @autodebunker in order to counter the information.
The idea here was to automate feedback to those retweeting information that had been debunked. His MacGyvered solution:
Create Twitter Account - in this case, @autodebunker
Grab RSS feed for Twitter posts that need debunking - done via Twitter advanced search
Create new RSS feed with Feedburner - This gives you some flexibility with the feed parameters
Use the Twitterfeed app to auto-publish your debunking - after all, you can’t manually chase down every retweet.
If interested in doing the same, check out Bradshaw’s post where he explains each of the steps above. It’s not a foolproof solution, and obviously can’t tackle all the errors we find online, but it is a neat hack to counter the misinformation that bugs you.

Correcting Errors Via Twitter

That misinformation can spread at lightning speed across social networks is a contemporary fact of life. News organizations — and those that watch them — have long tried to figure out how to correct errors post-publishing in a world where an initial misguided tweet takes on a life of its own in a spiral of retweets.

Paul Bradshaw of the Online Journalism Blog wrestled up an interesting hack to address the issue. After seeing reports that News of the World could destroy incriminating evidence against it once it shut down, he created @autodebunker in order to counter the information.

The idea here was to automate feedback to those retweeting information that had been debunked. His MacGyvered solution:

  1. Create Twitter Account - in this case, @autodebunker
  2. Grab RSS feed for Twitter posts that need debunking - done via Twitter advanced search
  3. Create new RSS feed with Feedburner - This gives you some flexibility with the feed parameters
  4. Use the Twitterfeed app to auto-publish your debunking - after all, you can’t manually chase down every retweet.

If interested in doing the same, check out Bradshaw’s post where he explains each of the steps above. It’s not a foolproof solution, and obviously can’t tackle all the errors we find online, but it is a neat hack to counter the misinformation that bugs you.

The Journalist’s Accuracy Checklist — via Regret The Error.
Craig Silverman, the list’s creator, recommends printing it, laminating it and taking a dry erase marker to it for each story you’re working on.
Original PDF.

The Journalist’s Accuracy Checklist — via Regret The Error.

Craig Silverman, the list’s creator, recommends printing it, laminating it and taking a dry erase marker to it for each story you’re working on.

Original PDF.