posts about or somewhat related to ‘reports’

Blogs Rule, But Brands are Ignoring Them
Technorati’s Media’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report is an important read for brand and marketing folk. In it, the authors write that consumers trust blogs more than social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.
The disconnect here is that brand marketers spend more time and resources on social networks, and vastly more dollars on display advertising, search and video.
Via Technorati (PDF):

Currently, the bulk of brands’ overall digital spend goes to display advertising, search and video, with spending on social, including influencer outreach, making up only 10 percent of their total digital spend. Within their social budget, more than half goes to Facebook, followed by YouTube and Twitter, with the remaining 11 percent of their social spend going to blogs and influencers…
…In short, where brands are spending is not fully aligned with how and where consumers are seeing value and being influenced. This has much to do with an essential hurdle faced by most content creators: a lack of metrics and the fragmentation that leads to their complexity as a purchasable medium.

The report’s authors argue that brands need to refocus their earned media strategies on direct engagement with influencers.
Image: Detail of digital and social budgets from Technorati’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report (PDF).

Blogs Rule, But Brands are Ignoring Them

Technorati’s Media’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report is an important read for brand and marketing folk. In it, the authors write that consumers trust blogs more than social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.

The disconnect here is that brand marketers spend more time and resources on social networks, and vastly more dollars on display advertising, search and video.

Via Technorati (PDF):

Currently, the bulk of brands’ overall digital spend goes to display advertising, search and video, with spending on social, including influencer outreach, making up only 10 percent of their total digital spend. Within their social budget, more than half goes to Facebook, followed by YouTube and Twitter, with the remaining 11 percent of their social spend going to blogs and influencers

…In short, where brands are spending is not fully aligned with how and where consumers are seeing value and being influenced. This has much to do with an essential hurdle faced by most content creators: a lack of metrics and the fragmentation that leads to their complexity as a purchasable medium.

The report’s authors argue that brands need to refocus their earned media strategies on direct engagement with influencers.

Image: Detail of digital and social budgets from Technorati’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report (PDF).

Amnesty Report 2012

Amnesty International released its 2012 report today, the 50th in the organization’s history. The grim of it: “Amnesty International Report 2012 documents specific restrictions on free speech in at least 91 countries as well as cases of people tortured or otherwise ill-treated in at least 101 countries – in many cases for taking part in demonstrations.”

A print version of the report is available for purchase at Amnesty. A Kindle edition via Amazon.

News Technology's Digital Divide →

While not what we traditionally think of when we think digital divides, the Pew Research Center’s 2012 State of the Media report notes a growing gap between news organizations and technology companies, with news organizations becoming increasingly reliant on them:

At the same time, a more fundamental challenge that we identified in this report last year has intensified — the extent to which technology intermediaries now control the future of news.

Two trends in the last year overlap and reinforce the sense that the gap between the news and technology industries is widening. First, the explosion of new mobile platforms and social media channels represents another layer of technology with which news organizations must keep pace.

Second, in the last year a small number of technology giants began rapidly moving to consolidate their power by becoming makers of “everything” in our digital lives. Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple and a few others are maneuvering to make the hardware people use, the operating systems that run those devices, the browsers on which people navigate, the e-mail services on which they communicate, the social networks on which they share and the web platforms on which they shop and play. And all of this will provide these companies with detailed personal data about each consumer…

…A year ago, we wrote here: “The news industry, late to adapt and culturally more tied to content creation than engineering, finds itself more a follower than leader shaping its business.” In 2012, that phenomenon has grown.

Seventy-four Percent of Tea Party Republicans Believe the News is Biased
A new Pew Research Center report on how Americans get their political news shows 74% of Tea Party Republicans believe the media is biased.
In the report, Pew notes that “[a]mong news audiences, those who cite the Fox News Channel or the radio as their main source of campaign news are the most likely to say there is a great deal of bias in news coverage.”
By contrast, 30% of moderate to conservative Democrats believe the media is biased.
Other findings include:
Cable television is the primary political news source for Americans;
The number of people getting their news from online news sources has leveled off after explosive growth between 2002 and 2008;
News consumption from newspapers and local and network television stations is in steep decline;
About 20% of Americans get campaign information via Facebook;
Just 5% get campaign information via Twitter;
Only 20% of people under 30 say they are following the campaign closely.
The Pew Research Center is available here and can be read online or downloaded.

Seventy-four Percent of Tea Party Republicans Believe the News is Biased

A new Pew Research Center report on how Americans get their political news shows 74% of Tea Party Republicans believe the media is biased.

In the report, Pew notes that “[a]mong news audiences, those who cite the Fox News Channel or the radio as their main source of campaign news are the most likely to say there is a great deal of bias in news coverage.”

By contrast, 30% of moderate to conservative Democrats believe the media is biased.

Other findings include:

  • Cable television is the primary political news source for Americans;
  • The number of people getting their news from online news sources has leveled off after explosive growth between 2002 and 2008;
  • News consumption from newspapers and local and network television stations is in steep decline;
  • About 20% of Americans get campaign information via Facebook;
  • Just 5% get campaign information via Twitter;
  • Only 20% of people under 30 say they are following the campaign closely.

The Pew Research Center is available here and can be read online or downloaded.

Jailed Journalists
The Committee to Protect Journalists is out with a report today that explores the imprisonment of journalists around the world.
Quick overview: the trend is going from bad to worse.
Via CPJ:

The number of journalists imprisoned worldwide shot up more than 20 percent to its highest level since the mid-1990s, an increase driven largely by widespread jailings across the Middle East and North Africa, the Committee to Protect Journalists has found. In its annual census of imprisoned journalists, CPJ identified 179 writers, editors, and photojournalists behind bars on December 1, an increase of 34 over its 2010 tally.
Iran was the world’s worst jailer, with 42 journalists behind bars, as authorities kept up a campaign of anti-press intimidation that began after the country’s disputed presidential election more than two years ago. Eritrea, China, Burma, Vietnam, Syria, and Turkey also ranked among the world’s worst.

Image: screenshot from a database of imprisoned journalists — along with the stories of their arrests — that is part of the report.

Jailed Journalists

The Committee to Protect Journalists is out with a report today that explores the imprisonment of journalists around the world.

Quick overview: the trend is going from bad to worse.

Via CPJ:

The number of journalists imprisoned worldwide shot up more than 20 percent to its highest level since the mid-1990s, an increase driven largely by widespread jailings across the Middle East and North Africa, the Committee to Protect Journalists has found. In its annual census of imprisoned journalists, CPJ identified 179 writers, editors, and photojournalists behind bars on December 1, an increase of 34 over its 2010 tally.

Iran was the world’s worst jailer, with 42 journalists behind bars, as authorities kept up a campaign of anti-press intimidation that began after the country’s disputed presidential election more than two years ago. Eritrea, China, Burma, Vietnam, Syria, and Turkey also ranked among the world’s worst.

Image: screenshot from a database of imprisoned journalists — along with the stories of their arrests — that is part of the report.

A Pew Research report indicates that US Spanish-language news media is doing much better than its English-language counterpart. For example, Spanish-language newspapers and magazines have seen less circulation loss over the last few years, and actually grew between 2009-2010.
As Leslie Berestein Rojas from Southern California Public Radio writes:

[T]he most interesting twist is in print media: Latinos like to read newspapers, and continue to do so. An industry study from 2009 showed that as mainstream and national newspapers endured readership declines, Spanish-language newspapers continued to be a top media choice, with 82 percent of Latinos surveyed reporting that they read them.

One instinctual explanation is immigration and the rise of the US Hispanic population. But, as the report points out, the vast majority of the Hispanic population increase is second and third generation bilingual children who consume both Spanish and English-language media.
Report | Rojas’.

A Pew Research report indicates that US Spanish-language news media is doing much better than its English-language counterpart. For example, Spanish-language newspapers and magazines have seen less circulation loss over the last few years, and actually grew between 2009-2010.

As Leslie Berestein Rojas from Southern California Public Radio writes:

[T]he most interesting twist is in print media: Latinos like to read newspapers, and continue to do so. An industry study from 2009 showed that as mainstream and national newspapers endured readership declines, Spanish-language newspapers continued to be a top media choice, with 82 percent of Latinos surveyed reporting that they read them.

One instinctual explanation is immigration and the rise of the US Hispanic population. But, as the report points out, the vast majority of the Hispanic population increase is second and third generation bilingual children who consume both Spanish and English-language media.

Report | Rojas’.

The printed word is alive and well whether it takes a paper delivery or digital delivery.

Tina Jordan, Vice President, Association of American Publishers, interviewed by the New York Times.  Publishing Gives Hints of Revival, Data Show.

A survey of 1,963 publishers by two major trade groups reveals that the book publishing industry is on the rebound.

Key findings via the Association of American Publishers

Overall U.S. publishing revenues are growing
Publishers’ net sales revenue has grown annually; 2010’s $27.94 Billion is a 5.6% increase over 2008.

Overall U.S. publishing unit sales are up as well
Publishers’ 2.57 Billion net units sold in 2010 represent a 4.1% increase since 2008.

Americans, young and old, are reading actively in all print and digital formats
2010 total net sales revenue in the consumer-focused Trade market is $13.94 Billion, increasing 5.8% since 2008 (and excluding 2011’s e-book sales surge). Both Adult Fiction and Juvenile (non-fiction and fiction) have seen consistent annual gains.

Half of all adults get local news or information on a cell phone or tablet computer.
Source: Pew Internet Survey.

Half of all adults get local news or information on a cell phone or tablet computer.

Source: Pew Internet Survey.

In October, England’s Women in Journalism surveyed 28 national newspapers for a study on the gender makeup of their newsrooms. Called A Gendered Press, the full report will be released on March 8 to celebrate International Women’s Day.
Says Sue Matthias, Chair of the organization, in a press release:

The gender imbalance we have uncovered is shocking and it seems old attitudes are still alive and well in many places. We hope this research contributes to the debate on the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day and helps to build a fairer, more meritocratic press.

Sarah Marshall of Journalism.co.uk has an interesting article on why this imbalance might be so. “If equal numbers of men and women are training as journalists,” she writes, “why are fewer women making it to the national newsrooms?”
Aside: Remember that Lady Journos tumble. Be sure to follow.

In October, England’s Women in Journalism surveyed 28 national newspapers for a study on the gender makeup of their newsrooms. Called A Gendered Press, the full report will be released on March 8 to celebrate International Women’s Day.

Says Sue Matthias, Chair of the organization, in a press release:

The gender imbalance we have uncovered is shocking and it seems old attitudes are still alive and well in many places. We hope this research contributes to the debate on the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day and helps to build a fairer, more meritocratic press.

Sarah Marshall of Journalism.co.uk has an interesting article on why this imbalance might be so. “If equal numbers of men and women are training as journalists,” she writes, “why are fewer women making it to the national newsrooms?”

Aside: Remember that Lady Journos tumble. Be sure to follow.

Year in News. Looking Back at 2010.
The Project for Excellence in Journalism analyzed 50,508 stories across platforms (television, print, radio, online) and created an interactive that lets us compare and contrast the frequency with which news stories played out across the media spectrum.
Interested in seeing how Fox, CNN and MSNBC filled their respective newsholes with Congressional scandals? You can do that. War on Terror? You can do that too.
Besides topics and media outlets, the tool lets you choose across criteria such as newsmakers and geography.
Writes Joel Meares on CJR:

Sharp analysis is already emerging from those fiddling around with the tool. John Sides at Monkey Cage chose to focus on the coverage female newsmakers received across the cable networks, with some interesting if unsurprising results. Daniel Little, at Understanding Society, to whom Sides links, reveals something a little more surprising by comparing how much of their coverage cable networks gave over to non political (at least on the surface) news stories from 2010 (the Economy, the BP oil spill, the Haiti earthquake, the Toyota recall, “cyberspace”). 

Methodology according to the PEJ:

PEJ’s News Coverage Index monitors news in 52 different mainstream media outlets from print, online, cable, network broadcast and radio. The New Media Index monitors commentary on millions of news-focused blogs as identified by the web tracking site Icerocket, and the leading news topics on Twitter as identified by the web tracking site Tweetmeme.

The interactive is here, the PEJ’s own analysis is here.

Year in News. Looking Back at 2010.

The Project for Excellence in Journalism analyzed 50,508 stories across platforms (television, print, radio, online) and created an interactive that lets us compare and contrast the frequency with which news stories played out across the media spectrum.

Interested in seeing how Fox, CNN and MSNBC filled their respective newsholes with Congressional scandals? You can do that. War on Terror? You can do that too.

Besides topics and media outlets, the tool lets you choose across criteria such as newsmakers and geography.

Writes Joel Meares on CJR:

Sharp analysis is already emerging from those fiddling around with the tool. John Sides at Monkey Cage chose to focus on the coverage female newsmakers received across the cable networks, with some interesting if unsurprising results. Daniel Little, at Understanding Society, to whom Sides links, reveals something a little more surprising by comparing how much of their coverage cable networks gave over to non political (at least on the surface) news stories from 2010 (the Economy, the BP oil spill, the Haiti earthquake, the Toyota recall, “cyberspace”).

Methodology according to the PEJ:

PEJ’s News Coverage Index monitors news in 52 different mainstream media outlets from print, online, cable, network broadcast and radio. The New Media Index monitors commentary on millions of news-focused blogs as identified by the web tracking site Icerocket, and the leading news topics on Twitter as identified by the web tracking site Tweetmeme.

The interactive is here, the PEJ’s own analysis is here.

Without much notice, some dedicated editors, reporters, news entrepreneurs and sponsors are refusing to lament the collapse of an industry. Instead, working from a nonprofit model, they have for decades been breaking important stories, and in just the last few years have made striking gains in numbers, recognition and impact.

Great reporting is still being done by the traditional media, but there is very little of it. It is the nonprofit model… that shows the most promise. More than anything else I can think of, it will serve — is already serving — to hold leaders accountable and keep important issues in public view.

Nonprofit news organizations are important in another respect. The Watergate era made many people see journalism as honest, worthwhile work. They don’t today. The nonprofit model, as it grows and strengthens and stays independent, could bring that spirit back and draw bright, idealistic young people into the profession.

And wouldn’t that be nice.

— Barry Sussman, Editor, Nieman Watchdog Project, on the role of nonprofits in investigative journalism.