Posts tagged reuters

News You Like to Use?
The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism surveyed 18,000 online news consumers across ten countries on their news habits. The results are available in their 2014 Digital News Report.
Related, via Al Jazeera, American’s faith in the news is at an all time low:

The latest edition of a Gallup poll that tracks confidence in media follows a decades-long trend that shows a declining faith in television and print news. The percentage of Americans that have “a great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in the three media formats now hover around one-fifth.
Twenty-two percent of respondents trust newspapers, 19 percent trust web-based news sites, and 18 percent say they trust TV. All three of those numbers are within the polls 4-point margin of error. 

Somewhat Related, via The New Republic: Does Fox News Cause Ignorance, or Do Ignorant Viewers Prefer Fox News?
TL;DR: Yes, but give it a read. It’s a great analysis of bandwagon effects and confirmation bias no matter your political inclinations.
Image: Most Important Types of News Among US News Consumers, via Marketing Charts and based on data from the Reuters Institute. Select to embiggen.

News You Like to Use?

The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism surveyed 18,000 online news consumers across ten countries on their news habits. The results are available in their 2014 Digital News Report.

Related, via Al Jazeera, American’s faith in the news is at an all time low:

The latest edition of a Gallup poll that tracks confidence in media follows a decades-long trend that shows a declining faith in television and print news. The percentage of Americans that have “a great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in the three media formats now hover around one-fifth.

Twenty-two percent of respondents trust newspapers, 19 percent trust web-based news sites, and 18 percent say they trust TV. All three of those numbers are within the polls 4-point margin of error. 

Somewhat Related, via The New Republic: Does Fox News Cause Ignorance, or Do Ignorant Viewers Prefer Fox News?

TL;DR: Yes, but give it a read. It’s a great analysis of bandwagon effects and confirmation bias no matter your political inclinations.

Image: Most Important Types of News Among US News Consumers, via Marketing Charts and based on data from the Reuters Institute. Select to embiggen.

Reuters' Matthew Keys indicted on conspiracy charges related to the hacker group Anonymous

shortformblog:

Matthew Keys, a deputy social media editor at Thomson Reuters, has been charged in an indictment for allegedly conspiring with members of the hacker group “Anonymous” to hack into a Tribune Company website, the Justice Department announced today.

Keys, a former web producer for the Tribune Co-owned television station KTXL FOX 40, in Sacramento, Calif., was charged with providing members of the group with log-in credentials for a computer server belonging to the Tribune Co., according to the DoJ’s press release.

SFB: In case you’d like to read the indictment, here it is.

Quick statement: Matt’s a good friend, and we’ve worked closely together for a couple of years, bouncing ideas off of one another and the whole bit. I talked to him three hours ago. We had no knowledge of this situation, and offer no other statement other than to hope that one of our favorite people is OK. Good luck, Matt. — Ernie @ SFB

FJP: Definitely good luck. One of our favorites.

Anthony De Rosa: Learn by Doing

We’re all up-and-comers, in one way or another. And whether it’s as a reporter or a developer, those who want to be a part of the journalism industry from now on will need several (or in some cases, many) technology-based skills.

In this video, Reuters’ Anthony De Rosa tells us some of his early professional history — how he got into coding as a side-job, which led him to learn a few Adobe programs. He learned by doing, which is the first important thing to remember. The second: he learned from others, through networking and informal mentorships.

Increasingly, you’ll grow your professional skill set with the help of friends and through colleagues, not institutional processes. You won’t necessarily be assigned or told what you’ll need to know. Follow your interests, and reach out to those who are a few steps ahead. They’ll help you, and you’ll help them.

The best part? All the time you spent playing in Photoshop may look good on your CV.

See our other video with Anthony here, and check back for another later this week.

Job: Reuters Community Manager

Fans of Anthony De Rosa (Soup) and Matthew Keys (ProducerMatthew) should brush up their resumes. They have a job for you over at Reuters.

Via soupsoup:

Reuters seeks a community manager to help facilitate robust and stimulating discussion of the news we deliver around the clock and around the world. This person will manage the discussions that take place across our internal (Reuters.com) and external (Facebook, Google+) platforms and come up with solutions for both hands on and automated quality control to maintain a place that encourages readers to contribute thoughtful dialogue.

The ideal candidate is someone who is encouraged by the idea of interacting with our readers, who knows how to promote content that will start smart conversations, who asks questions that will help facilitate and guide those discussions, and someone who won’t get frustrated or discouraged by “trolls.”

The job’s based in New York. Read Anthony’s full post for qualification details and contact information for applying.

Ninjas, News and Politics
Iran has suspended Reuters’ accreditation in the country over a story the news agency ran on Iranian women practicing the art of ninjutsu. 
At issue is wording in the Reuters report that called the women “ninja assassins” with the perceived implication that they’re training to protect the country from Western infidels.
In a statement, Reuters writes:

The story’s headline, “Thousands of female Ninjas train as Iran’s assassins”, was corrected to read “Three thousand women Ninjas train in Iran”.
Iran’s Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance subsequently contacted the Reuters Tehran bureau chief about the video and its publication, as a result of which Reuters’ 11 personnel were told to hand back their press cards.
"We acknowledge this error occurred and regard it as a very serious matter. It was promptly corrected the same day it came to our attention," said editor-in-chief Stephen J. Adler.

Meantime, some of the women are suing Reuters for misrepresenting them.
"Reuters has introduced us as assassins to the whole world," says one. ”The truth must come to light and everyone should know that we are only a group of athletes. We are supervised by the Ministry of Sports and the federation of martial arts.”
Background via The Atlantic.
Image: A Ninjutsu practitioner performs a split as members of various Ninjutsu schools showcase their skills to the media in a gym at Karaj, near Tehran. By Caren Firouz, via Reuters.

Ninjas, News and Politics

Iran has suspended Reuters’ accreditation in the country over a story the news agency ran on Iranian women practicing the art of ninjutsu. 

At issue is wording in the Reuters report that called the women “ninja assassins” with the perceived implication that they’re training to protect the country from Western infidels.

In a statement, Reuters writes:

The story’s headline, “Thousands of female Ninjas train as Iran’s assassins”, was corrected to read “Three thousand women Ninjas train in Iran”.

Iran’s Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance subsequently contacted the Reuters Tehran bureau chief about the video and its publication, as a result of which Reuters’ 11 personnel were told to hand back their press cards.

"We acknowledge this error occurred and regard it as a very serious matter. It was promptly corrected the same day it came to our attention," said editor-in-chief Stephen J. Adler.

Meantime, some of the women are suing Reuters for misrepresenting them.

"Reuters has introduced us as assassins to the whole world," says one. ”The truth must come to light and everyone should know that we are only a group of athletes. We are supervised by the Ministry of Sports and the federation of martial arts.”

Background via The Atlantic.

Image: A Ninjutsu practitioner performs a split as members of various Ninjutsu schools showcase their skills to the media in a gym at Karaj, near Tehran. By Caren Firouz, via Reuters.

Who’s getting what at the oil pump? With all the frenzy over oil prices, I’d like to see a simple but definitive story that takes a gallon of the gasoline Americans buy and breaks down exactly who gets how much of the $4.00 (or whatever the price is), starting with owners of the oil fields and including drillers, shippers, refiners, distributors, retailers, and, of course, the tax collectors. And which of these parties benefits the most when the price goes up?

Steven Brill in his column Stories I’d Like to See, which spotlights topics that he feels have received insufficient media attention. (via CJR)


discoverynews:

Love what Reuters has been up to lately. And this new feature is fantastic
alexleo:

Today we launched Social Pulse, our new social media hub on Reuters.com designed to show you the most talked-about news, companies and influencers across the Web.
We also launched a journalist Twitter directory so you can follow all our people by location and topic!

discoverynews:

Love what Reuters has been up to lately. And this new feature is fantastic

alexleo:

Today we launched Social Pulse, our new social media hub on Reuters.com designed to show you the most talked-about news, companies and influencers across the Web.

We also launched a journalist Twitter directory so you can follow all our people by location and topic!

chels:

Soup did a cool video on how he and others at Reuters use social media to track stories happening in real time. I always wonder about verifying sources on social media and what it takes to really curate a fully told story, and this video is a nice peek inside that process. 

There’s no one to blame for this, really. But it does illustrate, tastelessly and uncomfortably, that it will be a long time — perhaps not in my lifetime — before human editors are totally dispensable.

Alex Johnson writes in “Human Editors Matter" that real life editors are still essential. To illustrate the point he notes an automated headline generated by Google News about a missing boy found dead in a freezer.

The totally unrelated dek (or subhed) accompanying the headline reads: “A host of new surveys don’t paint a pretty picture for many small businesses. Uncertainty about the economy, slow retail sales and high commodity prices have small business owners in the dumps this summer.”

The Morning Retraction

On Tuesday we linked to a Reuters article stating that News Corp received $4.8 billion in tax refunds from the US government. The reporting was incorrect.

Via Reuters:

Please be advised that the David Cay Johnston column published on Tuesday stating that Rupert Murdoch’s U.S.-based News Corp made money on income taxes is wrong and has been withdrawn. News Corp’s filings show the company changed reporting conventions in its 2007 annual report when it reversed the way it showed positive and negative numbers. A new column correcting and explaining the error in more detail will be issued shortly.

As the big boys and girls say, we regret the error.

The Internet's not Killing Newspapers, Advertising Is

The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism has a new report out that looks at the state of newspaper industries across the world.

As paidContent explains, it’s not the Internet that’s responsible for newspapers’ decline, but an over reliance on advertising:

In many countries where online activity is high, including Scandinavia and Germany, newspapers are still faring well, with titles typically generating 50 percent of revenues from advertising…

…However, the American newspaper industry, which has generated more than 80 percent of its income from advertisements, is today in a much more serious crisis than its counterparts in Germany and Finland, where advertising typically constitutes about 50 percent of total revenues.

The study notes that countries with state-funded public service media “have seen much more stable developments in the business of journalism.”

Reuters starts off the annual “Best of” season with a slideshow from some of the 500 thousand photographs they take throughout the year.

The photo above was shot August 7 in the Muzaffargarh district of Pakistan. From photographer Adrees Latif


After spending days wading through flood waters to tell the story, I arrived in Multan on August 6 in hopes of getting a seat upon a chopper taking part in relief efforts…
…After loading the chopper with packets of cooked rice mixed with chickpeas, the crew and a handful of journalists departed in search of marooned villagers. We soon spotted families taking refuge on a cemetery, the only landmass in the area above water. As the helicopter came down to land, dozens of men and boys started to charge, forcing the pilots to hover over the crowd. As the doors to the helicopter opened to distribute food supplies, I saw my chance for a different angle and took a step back before leaping past the crewmen and jumped meters below onto the ground. I knew I had as much time to document the reality of the moment as it would take the crewmen to distribute the relief supplies they had brought. Tripping over mounds and gravestones, I managed to find enough distance from the helicopter to show dozens of hands reaching into the air to catch food rations being thrown down.

Shot with Canon EOS 5D Mark II, lens 16mm, f5.6, 1/400 sec, ISO 250.

Reuters starts off the annual “Best of” season with a slideshow from some of the 500 thousand photographs they take throughout the year.

The photo above was shot August 7 in the Muzaffargarh district of Pakistan. From photographer Adrees Latif

After spending days wading through flood waters to tell the story, I arrived in Multan on August 6 in hopes of getting a seat upon a chopper taking part in relief efforts…

…After loading the chopper with packets of cooked rice mixed with chickpeas, the crew and a handful of journalists departed in search of marooned villagers. We soon spotted families taking refuge on a cemetery, the only landmass in the area above water. As the helicopter came down to land, dozens of men and boys started to charge, forcing the pilots to hover over the crowd. As the doors to the helicopter opened to distribute food supplies, I saw my chance for a different angle and took a step back before leaping past the crewmen and jumped meters below onto the ground. I knew I had as much time to document the reality of the moment as it would take the crewmen to distribute the relief supplies they had brought. Tripping over mounds and gravestones, I managed to find enough distance from the helicopter to show dozens of hands reaching into the air to catch food rations being thrown down.

Shot with Canon EOS 5D Mark II, lens 16mm, f5.6, 1/400 sec, ISO 250.

Declaring that news providers in the U.S. are not “satisfying the needs” of publishers and broadcasters, Reuters will be expanding its offerings in the United States, with major announcements to come over the next couple of months, says Chris Ahearn, President of Media, Thomson Reuter in this exclusive video interview with Beet.TV.

Ahearn declined to offer specifics, but said the global news service had not focused on the U.S. domestic market.