Posts tagged with ‘satellite imagery’

Typhoon Haiyan

Via the BBC:

More than 120 people have been reported killed by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines after the massive storm swept through on Friday.

Aviation officials said 100 bodies were lying in the streets of the city of Tacloban. Local journalists reported 20 bodies in a church in a nearby town…

…The storm made landfall shortly before dawn on Friday, bringing gusts that reached 379km/h (235 mph), with waves as high as 15m (45ft), bringing up to 400mm (15.75 inches) of rain in places.

Images: Haiyan approaches the Philippines, via the Japan Meteorological Agency and EUMETSAT (top). Detailed infrared image of Haiyan’s Eye, via NOAA (middle). Haiyan rolls into the Philippines, via University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center (bottom). Select to embiggen.

NEXT DAY UPDATEPhilippines Typhoon Devastation Is Far Worse Than Expected As Death Toll Climbs to 10,000, via Slate.

Irene Makes Landfall in North Carolina
Via NASA:

The GOES-13 satellite saw Hurricane Irene on August 27, 2011 at 10:10 a.m. EDT after it made landfall at 8 a.m. in Cape Lookout, North Carolina. Irene’s outer bands had already extended into New England. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project.
From 22,300 miles in space, Hurricane Irene looks serene and impressive. That’s how NOAA’s GOES satellite sees Irene today as it batters the eastern U.S. coastline, but it’s quite a different story on the ground.

Irene Makes Landfall in North Carolina

Via NASA:

The GOES-13 satellite saw Hurricane Irene on August 27, 2011 at 10:10 a.m. EDT after it made landfall at 8 a.m. in Cape Lookout, North Carolina. Irene’s outer bands had already extended into New England. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project.

From 22,300 miles in space, Hurricane Irene looks serene and impressive. That’s how NOAA’s GOES satellite sees Irene today as it batters the eastern U.S. coastline, but it’s quite a different story on the ground.

Hello, Irene.

Hello, Irene.