posts about or somewhat related to ‘schools’

Nine-Year-Old Blogger 1, Bad School Food 0
Via Wired:

For the past two months, one of my favorite reads has been Never Seconds, a blog started by 9-year-old Martha Payne of western Scotland to document the unappealing, non-nutritious lunches she was being served in her public primary school. Payne, whose mother is a doctor and father has a small farming property, started blogging in early May and went viral in days. She had a million viewers within a few weeks and 2 million this morning; was written up in Time, the Telegraph, the Daily Mail, and a number of food blogs; and got support from TV cheflebrity Jamie Oliver, whose series “Jamie’s School Dinners” kicked off school-food reform in England.
Well, goodbye to all that.
This afternoon, Martha (who goes by “Veg” on the blog) posted that she will have to shut down her blog, because she has been forbidden to take a camera into school.

At which point the Internet erupted.
Today, Wired comes back with this update:

So much happened overnight:
Huge amounts of public support, including from Jamie Oliver (who tweeted “Stay strong, Martha!”) and Neil Gaiman.
214 news articles worldwide in the past 12 hours.
Another half-million pageviews at the NeverSeconds blog (and almost 1,000 comments on her Goodbye post, up from about 150 when I posted last night).
The Guardian proposed that people take pictures of their lunches and tweet them #MyLunchforMartha

Also today, the Argyll and Bute Council, whose decision it was to ban Martha’s photography, relented. Back to Wired:

…[T]he leader of the Argyll and Bute Council, Roddy McCuish, [just] went on the BBC’s World At One program on Radio 4 and announced they were backing off the ban in response to a request from Scotland’s education minister along with vast pressure from social media.

Lesson: Don’t mess with a nine-year-old blogger.
Image: Martha Payne’s lunch from May 25, via NeverSeconds.

Nine-Year-Old Blogger 1, Bad School Food 0

Via Wired:

For the past two months, one of my favorite reads has been Never Seconds, a blog started by 9-year-old Martha Payne of western Scotland to document the unappealing, non-nutritious lunches she was being served in her public primary school. Payne, whose mother is a doctor and father has a small farming property, started blogging in early May and went viral in days. She had a million viewers within a few weeks and 2 million this morning; was written up in Time, the Telegraph, the Daily Mail, and a number of food blogs; and got support from TV cheflebrity Jamie Oliver, whose series “Jamie’s School Dinners” kicked off school-food reform in England.

Well, goodbye to all that.

This afternoon, Martha (who goes by “Veg” on the blog) posted that she will have to shut down her blog, because she has been forbidden to take a camera into school.

At which point the Internet erupted.

Today, Wired comes back with this update:

So much happened overnight:

  • Huge amounts of public support, including from Jamie Oliver (who tweeted “Stay strong, Martha!”) and Neil Gaiman.
  • 214 news articles worldwide in the past 12 hours.
  • Another half-million pageviews at the NeverSeconds blog (and almost 1,000 comments on her Goodbye post, up from about 150 when I posted last night).
  • The Guardian proposed that people take pictures of their lunches and tweet them #MyLunchforMartha

Also today, the Argyll and Bute Council, whose decision it was to ban Martha’s photography, relented. Back to Wired:

…[T]he leader of the Argyll and Bute Council, Roddy McCuish, [just] went on the BBC’s World At One program on Radio 4 and announced they were backing off the ban in response to a request from Scotland’s education minister along with vast pressure from social media.

Lesson: Don’t mess with a nine-year-old blogger.

Image: Martha Payne’s lunch from May 25, via NeverSeconds.

CMRUBINWORLDAUTHOR: How Will We Read: Newspapers? →

cmrubinworld:


“Nothing replaces a good editor, and I would add, a good visual editor, creating the news for the reader so that it makes enjoyable and interesting reading.” — Francois Dufour

There are many more ways to read news material these days, thanks to the Internet. The Internet makes news easy to…

Could a new generation, raised on print newspapers from childhood, be the key to saving print media? I hope you’ll read this fascinating interview with Francois Dufour, the editor and chief and co-founder of Play Bac, publishers of Mon Quotidien, the first daily print newspaper for kids. The aim is to get kids to read for 10 minutes per day.

Delivered six times per week with the mail, the three age-targeted dailies have 150,000 subscribers and 2 million readers in France.

Kids love them because the content is not adult news explained to kids! It is news a nine or 12 or 15 year-old is interested in. We seldom feature an article on the same day it is published in adult news. One exception was the day bin Laden was killed. Also, I think kids like the fact that our papers are short (four to eight pages long). Our papers are also very visual. Finally, the journalism in our newspapers is serious. It is not childish.

While the newspaper has been downloadable for more than one year, Dufour says that only about 150 people per day read the app version of the publication.

Full Story…