posts about or somewhat related to ‘scoops’

shortformblog:

So the week of The Daily’s closing, they break a story revealing that city buses across the country are adding audio-recording mechanisms to eavesdrop on conversations. What terrible timing for a scoop. :/

shortformblog:

So the week of The Daily’s closing, they break a story revealing that city buses across the country are adding audio-recording mechanisms to eavesdrop on conversations. What terrible timing for a scoop. :/

WikiLeaks’ intent has always been to maximize its impact, but its media strategy has changed significantly since it began in 2007, with the idea that if it posted important documents to its site — come one, come all — journalists would eagerly report the news there. Since then, it has learned the value of an “exclusive” to journalists, creating partnerships with publishers that impose a collective embargo on when the material can be published in return for privileged access to the material.

Brian Stelter and Noam Cohen, New York Times. In WikiLeaks’ Growth, Some Control Is Lost.

Last fall when Wikileaks began releasing US State Department cables it worked closely with the New York Times, The Guardian, El Pais, Der Spiegel and Le Monde in order to maximize global coverage of information contained within them.

As its relationship with the Times and the Guardian deteriorated, Wikileaks withheld the new Guantanamo documents from them while developing partnerships with other news outlets to coordinate their release. Not to be outdone though, both the Times and the Guardian have gotten copies of their own and the race to scoop the whistleblower is on.

As Harvard’s Yochai Benklar explains, “The future of the networked Fourth Estate will involve a mixture of traditional and online models, cooperating and competing on a global scale in a productive but difficult relationship.”

Today, the Times published a 5,000 word reconstruct on [Deepwater Horizon and the Gulf Oil Spill], some eight months after the fact. In their nut graf, they assert that “this was a disaster with two distinct parts — first a blowout, then the destruction of the Horizon. The second part, which killed 11 people and injured dozens, has escaped intense scrutiny, as if it were an inevitable casualty of the blowout. It was not.”

They go on to assert that their story “based on interviews with 21 Horizon crew members and on sworn testimony and written statements from nearly all of the other 94 people who escaped the rig” along with thousands of documents “obtained by The New York Times describing the rig’s maintenance and operations make it possible to finally piece together the Horizon’s last hours.”

There’s just one problem, of course: Their key assertions that the destruction of the Horizon “has escaped intense scrutiny” and that the final hours are only now possible to piece together are patently false.

— Harry Weber, Associated Press reporter, asserting the New York Times has no Gulf Oil Spill scoop.

How Has Business Journalism Changed in the Past 10 Years? →

It’s a completely different place in many respects. Breaking news has become a tougher business unto itself. When I first started, the Holy Grail was to publish your scoop in the New York Times, and you’d be able to hold onto it for 24 hours. Now, you have your scoop at 5:02 p.m., and someone will have matched your scoop by 5:05 p.m. In some part, it’s ephemereal.

Breaking news is important, and investors are always interested in new news. But I think there’s more of an appetite now for more analysis. If Dealbook does anything, I hope it does anything, explaining what comes next and how the dominoes will fall.

Aggregation has changed. When I started doing this, I was literally in my pajamas at 4 o’clock in the morning, linking stories all over the Internet. Back then, nobody did that. Blogs didn’t exist. Twitter didn’t exist. 

— Andrew Sorkin, Founder, Dealbook.