posts about or somewhat related to ‘servers’

Let's Pause for a Moment and Praise Tumblr's Engineers →

We’re on Tumblr. If you’re reading this you’re (probably) on Tumblr.

And if you’re on Tumblr and we’re on Tumblr we have a shared history of great times, fun people and… unfortunate downtimes.

These don’t happen as much as they used to in our neck of the woods.

And that’s because Tumblr is scaling… everywhere.

As in, it gets 15 billion page views a month, has a peak rate of 40 thousand requests per second, collects more or less three terabytes of new content a day, all running on approximately one thousand servers.

And they’re doing this with about 20 engineers.

If you’re a geek, a friend of a geek, or simply sympathetic (and/or empathetic) to geeks that build platforms and keep them running so that the rest of us can do what we do, read High Scalability’s article on Tumblr’s architecture, its goals, and the hurdles it’s facing as it tries to reach those goals.

In it, Blake Matheny, Tumblr’s Distributed Systems Engineer, guides us through stats, software, hardware, architecture and lessons learned.

It’s mesmerizing, in a geeky sort of way.

In the meantime, it’s Valentines tomorrow. Consider sending the Tumblr crew a slew of hugs and kisses.

The Astronomy of Data
Scientists at the University of California San Diego recently released a study (PDF) that estimates the amount of data the world’s business computers serve.
Their answer: 9,570,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes.
That doesn’t mean a whole lot to me either so let’s do some round number math. We’re talking almost 9 trillion gigabytes, or, in geek speak, 8.1 zettabytes (there are 1,024 bytes in a kilobyte, 1,024 kilobytes in a megabyte, etc.)
The number’s still too abstract to visualize so let’s print out all that information as ones and zeros and bring in a little astronomy. The result: a 5.6 billion mile high stack of books that goes from Earth to Neptune and back again about 20 times.
And keep in mind this is just business data. It’s not the YouTubes and Facebooks and Flickrs of the world. It’s not the world’s newspapers and publications. And it’s not the terabytes of data collected daily by the world’s telescopes that photograph the universe.
H/T: Computerworld.
Image Source: NASA.gov.

The Astronomy of Data

Scientists at the University of California San Diego recently released a study (PDF) that estimates the amount of data the world’s business computers serve.

Their answer: 9,570,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes.

That doesn’t mean a whole lot to me either so let’s do some round number math. We’re talking almost 9 trillion gigabytes, or, in geek speak, 8.1 zettabytes (there are 1,024 bytes in a kilobyte, 1,024 kilobytes in a megabyte, etc.)

The number’s still too abstract to visualize so let’s print out all that information as ones and zeros and bring in a little astronomy. The result: a 5.6 billion mile high stack of books that goes from Earth to Neptune and back again about 20 times.

And keep in mind this is just business data. It’s not the YouTubes and Facebooks and Flickrs of the world. It’s not the world’s newspapers and publications. And it’s not the terabytes of data collected daily by the world’s telescopes that photograph the universe.

H/T: Computerworld.

Image Source: NASA.gov.