Posts tagged spam

Reddit isn't messing around with spammers, even if they're very well-known. They just banned people from posting links to such rogue sites as The Atlantic and BusinessWeek.

shortformblog:

Redditors are collecting the blacklisted sites at a freshly minted subreddit, r/BannedDomains. The list so far includes at least five: BusinessWeek.com, Phys.org, ScienceDaily.com,TheAtlantic.com, and GlobalPost.

Redditors are prevented from submitting links to any of the above sites. Instead, they’re greeted with the following message: “this domain has been banned for spamming and/or cheating.”

There’s a bit of backstory here: Jared Keller, a social media editor for The Atlantic, got banned from Reddit a couple months back after heavy posting of Atlantic links, something the community-oriented network frowns upon, but is very tempting due to the high amount of traffic it drives. But why prevent people from even submitting links from such big sites? Well, a Reddit technical staffer Jason Harvey claims that these actions were taken as an absolute last resort.

FJP: There’s sharing… and then there’s oversharing.

UPDATE: ShortFormBlog has discovered that the bans are temporary.

Forty Percent of Social Media Accounts Are Spam
Every so often I’ll get an uptick in followers on my Twitter account. This makes me happy.
It also makes me curious about who might be interested in my 140 character missives.
And more often than not I discover it’s a bunch of pornbots linking out to fleshy sites.
Tumblr has this problem too. They’ve cleaned it up a lot but we still get a fair amount of likes from accounts that redirect to walls of naked bodies doing naked body things.
I’m not alone though. After years of clogging email inboxes, spam is infiltrating the social Web. According to Mark Risher, CEO of an anti-spam software company called Impermium, in an interview with Businessweek, up to 40% of social media accounts are spam.
Via Businessweek:

About 8 percent of messages sent via social pages are spam, approximately twice the volume of six months ago, [Risher] says. Spammers use the sharing features on social sites to spread their messages. Click on a spammer’s link on Facebook (FB), and it may ask you to “like” or “share” a page, or to allow an app to gain access to your profile.
Facebook and Twitter have hired programmers and security specialists to deflect the flotsam. “Tens of millions of dollars are spent on our site-integrity systems, including hundreds of full-time employees,” says Facebook spokesman Frederic Wolens.
In January, Facebook sued advertising network Adscend Media, accusing it of sending unsolicited messages to Facebook users. A typical lure cited in the suit: “You will be SHOCKED when you see this video. Simply “Like” this page to see the video.” By clicking on a link, some users may unwittingly “like” the spam, a practice security experts call “likejacking.” At least 280,214 users were tricked into interacting with spam. About 80 percent of Adscend’s monthly revenue of $1.2 million comes from Facebook scams, according to the suit.

Businessweek: 'Likejacking': Spammers Hit Social Media.

Forty Percent of Social Media Accounts Are Spam

Every so often I’ll get an uptick in followers on my Twitter account. This makes me happy.

It also makes me curious about who might be interested in my 140 character missives.

And more often than not I discover it’s a bunch of pornbots linking out to fleshy sites.

Tumblr has this problem too. They’ve cleaned it up a lot but we still get a fair amount of likes from accounts that redirect to walls of naked bodies doing naked body things.

I’m not alone though. After years of clogging email inboxes, spam is infiltrating the social Web. According to Mark Risher, CEO of an anti-spam software company called Impermium, in an interview with Businessweek, up to 40% of social media accounts are spam.

Via Businessweek:

About 8 percent of messages sent via social pages are spam, approximately twice the volume of six months ago, [Risher] says. Spammers use the sharing features on social sites to spread their messages. Click on a spammer’s link on Facebook (FB), and it may ask you to “like” or “share” a page, or to allow an app to gain access to your profile.

Facebook and Twitter have hired programmers and security specialists to deflect the flotsam. “Tens of millions of dollars are spent on our site-integrity systems, including hundreds of full-time employees,” says Facebook spokesman Frederic Wolens.

In January, Facebook sued advertising network Adscend Media, accusing it of sending unsolicited messages to Facebook users. A typical lure cited in the suit: “You will be SHOCKED when you see this video. Simply “Like” this page to see the video.” By clicking on a link, some users may unwittingly “like” the spam, a practice security experts call “likejacking.” At least 280,214 users were tricked into interacting with spam. About 80 percent of Adscend’s monthly revenue of $1.2 million comes from Facebook scams, according to the suit.

Businessweek: 'Likejacking': Spammers Hit Social Media.

Another Saturday. Another spambot.

Another Saturday. Another spambot.

Twenty-five years ago Eric Thomas created the Listserv to send group emails. Today, 30 million emails are sent using a Listserv each day.
While ingrained in our digital communications with each other, teens are sending less email than before. Instead they opt to communicate via Facebook, SMS and chat.
Still, there are 3 billion email accounts today and 107 trillion emails were sent in 2010. Unfortunately, 89% of those were spam. 
That’s 95.23 trillion unwanted messages about increasing the size of certain body parts or ordering pharmaceuticals from some shady corner of the globe. It’s also billions of dollars spent by organizations trying to ward off the deluge.
Stats via Fast Company.

Twenty-five years ago Eric Thomas created the Listserv to send group emails. Today, 30 million emails are sent using a Listserv each day.

While ingrained in our digital communications with each other, teens are sending less email than before. Instead they opt to communicate via Facebook, SMS and chat.

Still, there are 3 billion email accounts today and 107 trillion emails were sent in 2010. Unfortunately, 89% of those were spam. 

That’s 95.23 trillion unwanted messages about increasing the size of certain body parts or ordering pharmaceuticals from some shady corner of the globe. It’s also billions of dollars spent by organizations trying to ward off the deluge.

Stats via Fast Company.