posts about or somewhat related to ‘sports illustrated’

But King didn’t give readers an accurate picture—he gave them a partial and exaggerated one. He has the thickest Rolodex in the business, but he talked to only four people, and his colleagues talked to eight. In a league as large and diverse as the NFL, 12 is not a definitive sample. The SI stories offered no counterbalancing opinion or analysis, so the message was clear: This is the NFL party line. No one will talk on the record. And if anyone does, don’t trust him.

Stephen Fatsis, How Sports Illustrated Botched the Michael Sam Story, Slate.

Background: Sports Illustrated published a piece by Pete Thamel and Thayer Evans on how the news that NFL prospect Michael Sam is gay will affect his draft stock. The “eight NFL executives and coaches” they spoke with predicted Sam’s fall to bigotry in the league. None of these sources were identified. Slate breaks it down.

Issue 1: Not a reasonable reflection of reality.

…the issue here isn’t the ungrounded and outdated opinions of a few off-the-record soothsayers. It’s about whether they deserved a platform in the first place, and whether the conclusions drawn from their words were a reasonable reflection of a broader reality.

Then Peter King posted a column in which he too gave his sources cover on the assumption that they wouldn’t talk otherwise.

Issue 2: Not okay to grant anonymity based on assumption.

King assumed they wouldn’t comment on the record so he granted anonymity up front? Maybe my journalistic principles are stuck in the ’50s, but that’s a newsroom no-no. You grant anonymity to get information or to understand background and context. You don’t let a source trash someone anonymously. King wrote that anonymity “would give the best information possible.” But he didn’t give information, only blind, unchallenged opinion. If his sources had spoken on the record and said something mealy-mouthed or had outright lied, King would have performed a journalistic service far greater than letting them shiv Michael Sam in his pursuit of “the truth.”

FJP: The ethics of using anonymous sources is pretty clear. Once you agree to providing anonymity, you stick to it or you’ll find yourself in a lawsuit. But the wisdom of knowing when to grant a source anonymity is far more difficult to come by. Here’s an interesting take on it from the Times, whose readers’ number 1 complaint is anonymous sources.

Related: Texas sports anchor Dale Hansen telling it like it is.

Click through for a great article on Sports Illustrated’s effort to digitalize their business and publication.
Thanks Mashable! 

Click through for a great article on Sports Illustrated’s effort to digitalize their business and publication.

Thanks Mashable

ShortFormBlog took us (lightly) to task the other day when we gave USA Today a thumbs down for their implementation of QR codes in the newspaper. So we’re back again with a new attempt, this time by Sports Illustrated for its annual swimsuit issue.
Those with the print issue can connect to extra content with their smart phones by using 2D barcodes via Microsoft Tags. 
Via paidContent:

It also includes a sharing function that lets print readers send videos via Facebook, Twitter or e-mail. And if readers still want more digital activity, the codes take them right to the app store to download the Swimsuit Mobile App. And it all works on Apple’s iPhone, BlackBerry, and Android devices.
It’s not just for print readers either. Bored or extra-observant commuters were also factored into the mobile campaign. In addition to the action codes within the magazine, Microsoft Tags linked to mobile content will be placed on phone kiosks, subway posters, and signage in New York and Las Vegas.  Those out-of-home tags connect users to a swimsuit body paint video that they can share with their Facebook and also offered a “pre-order” option for the magazine issue in recent weeks.

Our issue with USA Today wasn’t their use of QR codes, but their implementation. Sports Illustrated seems to have thought through the print to digital divide and from what we read, are doing it well.

ShortFormBlog took us (lightly) to task the other day when we gave USA Today a thumbs down for their implementation of QR codes in the newspaper. So we’re back again with a new attempt, this time by Sports Illustrated for its annual swimsuit issue.

Those with the print issue can connect to extra content with their smart phones by using 2D barcodes via Microsoft Tags. 

Via paidContent:

It also includes a sharing function that lets print readers send videos via Facebook, Twitter or e-mail. And if readers still want more digital activity, the codes take them right to the app store to download the Swimsuit Mobile App. And it all works on Apple’s iPhone, BlackBerry, and Android devices.

It’s not just for print readers either. Bored or extra-observant commuters were also factored into the mobile campaign. In addition to the action codes within the magazine, Microsoft Tags linked to mobile content will be placed on phone kiosks, subway posters, and signage in New York and Las Vegas.  Those out-of-home tags connect users to a swimsuit body paint video that they can share with their Facebook and also offered a “pre-order” option for the magazine issue in recent weeks.

Our issue with USA Today wasn’t their use of QR codes, but their implementation. Sports Illustrated seems to have thought through the print to digital divide and from what we read, are doing it well.