Posts tagged with ‘state department’

Groundhog's Day: DOJ Tracks Fox Reporter's Phone Records →

Last week’s news was that the Justice Department seized two months of Associated Press phone records.

This week’s begins with a report that the DOJ surveilled Fox News’ chief Washington correspondent James Rosen, tracking his visits to the State Department in an apparent attempt to link a 2009 leak of classified information about North Korea to government adviser Stephen Jin-Woo Kim

Via the Washington Post:

When the Justice Department began investigating possible leaks of classified information about North Korea in 2009, investigators did more than obtain telephone records of a working journalist suspected of receiving the secret material.

They used security badge access records to track the reporter’s comings and goings from the State Department, according to a newly obtained court affidavit. They traced the timing of his calls with a State Department security adviser suspected of sharing the classified report. They obtained a search warrant for the reporter’s personal e-mails.

The case of Stephen Jin-Woo Kim, the government adviser, and James Rosen, the chief Washington correspondent for Fox News, bears striking similarities to a sweeping leaks investigation disclosed last week in which federal investigators obtained records over two months of more than 20 telephone lines assigned to the Associated Press…

…Court documents in the Kim case reveal how deeply investigators explored the private communications of a working journalist — and raise the question of how often journalists have been investigated as closely as Rosen was in 2010. The case also raises new concerns among critics of government secrecy about the possible stifling effect of these investigations on a critical element of press freedom: the exchange of information between reporters and their sources.

Washington Post, A rare peek into a Justice Department leak probe.

Crowdsourcing the Hunt for Humans and Aliens
Two unrelated stories this morning that we’d like to relate:
1. The US State Department is running a competition at the end of the month called Tag Challenge. The social game involves participants tracking “suspects” in five different cities in North America and Europe with the only clue being the person’s mug shot. Teams will have a day to find the suspect and the goal is to see how social media and crowdsourcing help and enable law enforcement to capture fugitives. Big Brother is offering the winning team $5,000. Wired has the story here.
2. The Search For Extra Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has launched a Web site to crowdsource its hunt for alien life. For a long time now people have been able to install an app on their computers that donates unused processing power to help sift through SETI data but now they want actual human intelligence and analysis involved.
Via the BBC:

The project is being run by Dr Jillian Tarter, winner of the TED Prize in 2009 and director of the Seti Institute’s Center for Seti Research.
She has devoted her career to hunting for signs of sentient beings elsewhere.
She hopes Seti Live will help build upon the community of scientists and technologists already involved in the search.
"There are frequencies that our automated signal detection systems now ignore, because there are too many signals there," she said.
"Most are created by Earth’s communication and entertainment technologies, but buried within this noise there may be a signal from a distant technology.
"I’m hoping that an army of volunteers can help us deal with these crowded frequency bands that confuse our machines. By doing this in real time, we will have an opportunity to follow up immediately on what our volunteers discover."

Image: Screenshot from the State Department’s Tag Challenge Web site.

Crowdsourcing the Hunt for Humans and Aliens

Two unrelated stories this morning that we’d like to relate:

1. The US State Department is running a competition at the end of the month called Tag Challenge. The social game involves participants tracking “suspects” in five different cities in North America and Europe with the only clue being the person’s mug shot. Teams will have a day to find the suspect and the goal is to see how social media and crowdsourcing help and enable law enforcement to capture fugitives. Big Brother is offering the winning team $5,000. Wired has the story here.

2. The Search For Extra Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has launched a Web site to crowdsource its hunt for alien life. For a long time now people have been able to install an app on their computers that donates unused processing power to help sift through SETI data but now they want actual human intelligence and analysis involved.

Via the BBC:

The project is being run by Dr Jillian Tarter, winner of the TED Prize in 2009 and director of the Seti Institute’s Center for Seti Research.

She has devoted her career to hunting for signs of sentient beings elsewhere.

She hopes Seti Live will help build upon the community of scientists and technologists already involved in the search.

"There are frequencies that our automated signal detection systems now ignore, because there are too many signals there," she said.

"Most are created by Earth’s communication and entertainment technologies, but buried within this noise there may be a signal from a distant technology.

"I’m hoping that an army of volunteers can help us deal with these crowded frequency bands that confuse our machines. By doing this in real time, we will have an opportunity to follow up immediately on what our volunteers discover."

Image: Screenshot from the State Department’s Tag Challenge Web site.

Tell it to Assange... US State Department Pushing Internet Freedom as Basic Human Right →

Via Reuters, by Andrew Quinn

WASHINGTON, Feb 14 (Reuters) - Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will unveil a new U.S. push for global Internet freedoms on Tuesday, citing Internet-fired protests in Egypt and Iran as examples of how new technologies can spark political transformation.

Clinton, making her second major address on Internet policy amid growing evidence of how communications technologies can transform politics around the globe, will underscore U.S. commitments to a free, open and secure Internet, the State Department said on Monday, releasing excerpts of her speech.

"There is a debate underway in some circles about whether the Internet is a force for liberation or repression. But as the events in Iran, Egypt and elsewhere have shown, that debate is largely beside the point," one excerpt of Clinton’s speech says…