Posts tagged storify

How to Use Storify as Your One-Stop Social Media Search Engine

Regardless of whether you actually want to create a storify. David Higgerson describes 12 tips with examples so read through his post.

Short version:

  1. Create a Storify, just for the sake of recording what you find.
  2. When searching, use the words people on social networks use.
  3. Make a beeline for Facebook, where you’ll find a lot of people to start with when looking for sources.
  4. Filter out retweets.
  5. Use Twitter images.
  6. Use the location filter carefully.
  7. Embed picture Tweets.
  8. Get your search criteria right on YouTube.
  9. Check photo dates on Flickr.
  10. Just because Instagram pictures are often filtered, doesn’t mean you can’t get valuable information from them.
  11. Storify lets you search Google too.
  12. Beware of hoaxes.

An addendum to #12: this post by Steve Buttry on how to verify information on Twitter.

Related: This piece on Andy Carvin, the “one man Twitter news bureau” and his social media news process.

If things that are not journalism entertain, inform and facilitate agency better than things that are, don’t bet on journalism to thrive.

I work for a newspaper and I think about how to reinvent newspapers and reassert their relevance all the time. And people are consuming more news than ever, so we must be doing something right. My guess, though? Most innovation in media and most of the revenue and most of the value will come not from the incumbents and not even from news startups, but from people who unwittingly stumble into producing media as the solution to another problem.

Stijn Debrouwere in his recent blog post on the state of the news industry and opportunities ahead.

He argues that journalism’s disrupters are companies that don’t actually produce journalism, but fulfill the same underlying consumer needs that traditional journalism has sought to fulfill. 

I will repeat this because it’s important: YouTube nor Facebook or any of these other companies aim to be an alternative to journalism and much of what they facilitate or do doesn’t look like journalism at all. A good chunk of it contains written or spoken words, but sometimes not even that. It’s not journalism. But you’d be naive if you thought their services aren’t often consumed instead of news. It’s the same kind of functionality in a different package, after all, and that new package happens to be rather attractive a lot of the time.

Thus, the shift in journalism is radical—“from narrative and stories and reporting to entirely different and entirely unrelated ways of sharing knowledge.”

News organizations and publications may be able to survive in the digital era, but that’s about it:

I’m confident that strong digital players like The Guardian and the New York Times and Digital First Media will survive. I’m less confident that they’ll ever thriveI mean, we’re congratulating The Guardian for losing money online, NYTbecause its paywall isn’t the crash-and-burn we expected it to be, and because the Journal Register Company is in the black. If you don’t go out of business, you’re a hero.

Through this same lens, he comments on effective changes being made in the news industry, and what more can be done.

If people tell you, as they did assistant professor Amy Zerba’s research assistants, that they hate not being able to multitask when reading a newspaper, does that mean we should try to find ways to make it easier for readers to multitask, or is it simply a symptom of people not caring all that much about the news? And does that in turn mean they just don’t care about stuff in general anymore and have become jaded and uninterested in politics and world news (for which there is some evidence), or is there more to it and are people perhaps getting their information needs met in other, more convenient or more exciting ways? Are we trying to get better at something that doesn’t matter anymore? Perhaps we should take the best traditions of journalism and do something entirely new with it. 

Read on. The comments on the post are most interesting, as are the reactions storified by Burt Herman.

Storified: The Carole King Twitter Sing-A-Long of 2012

nprfreshair:

Carole King is the guest on Fresh Air today. I asked some of my public media friends to help let people know via a sing-a-long on possibly the most hilarious medium to have a sing-a-long: Twitter. Naturally, This American Life started us off.

FJP: We’d been trying figure out what the best use for Storify is. Compiling a sing-a-long seems to top the list.

Chao:  This is a wonderful article on the web startup named Storify.  Last semester my class at NYU’s Studio 20 had the pleasure of having Burt Herman as a guest, and we also got to test the beta of the service. 

Photo and quote Via the NY Times: Filtering the Social Web to Present News Items by Claire Cain Miller


A Web start-up named Storify, which opens to the public Monday, aims to help journalists and others collect and filter all this information.
Using the Storify Web site, people can find and piece together publicly available content from Twitter, Flickr,Facebook, YouTube and other sites. They can also add text and embed the resulting collages of content on their own sites. During a private test period, reporters from The Washington Post, NPR, PBS and other outlets used the service

Chao:  This is a wonderful article on the web startup named Storify.  Last semester my class at NYU’s Studio 20 had the pleasure of having Burt Herman as a guest, and we also got to test the beta of the service. 

Photo and quote Via the NY Times: Filtering the Social Web to Present News Items by Claire Cain Miller

A Web start-up named Storify, which opens to the public Monday, aims to help journalists and others collect and filter all this information.

Using the Storify Web site, people can find and piece together publicly available content from Twitter, Flickr,FacebookYouTube and other sites. They can also add text and embed the resulting collages of content on their own sites. During a private test period, reporters from The Washington Post, NPR, PBS and other outlets used the service

Storify raises $2 million

Via Techcrunch

Storify, which is still in private beta, allows you to build and embed a story around a gathering of Tweets, Flickr photos, Facebook status updates, YouTube videos and more. Within Storify’s platform, you can simple search and drag content into your Storify story. Once you create a story with all of this curated content, you can then embed the actual story in your blog or content management system via single like of Javascript.

Bonus for those of us on Tumblr: you can publish directly to your blogs from Storify.

You can see Storify Storifying their announcement here.

Al Jazeera English uses curation tool Storify to tell the story of Egypt’s ‘Day of Rage,’ with first-hand accounts from Twitter, Facebook and across the social Web. “Egypt on Fire!!!”

New Journalism Orgs Struggle to Cover Capitol Hill Without Media Credentials

To cover Capitol Hill reporters need access to lawmakers and press events. However, a new generation of publications with new business models, or without print distribution are being shut out, in spite of the important role they play in covering Washington affairs. 

Josh Stearns of Free Press uses Storify to tell how obtaining media credentials for new journalism organizations is a job unto itself.

Qwiki and Storify: Disruptive storytelling comes of age

In its current form, Qwiki trawls the API’s of the web (including Wikipedia, Google Maps, LinkedIn, Yelp and others) to assemble (mostly) coherent, interactive videos on over 2- million topics, from the French Revolution to The Godfather movies and Thabo Mbeki. Every slice of every presentation is clickable and links out to whatever sources it is compiled from.

Crucially, the whole process is automated from start to finish: the finished multimedia, or ‘qwiki’, is compiled entirely by algorithm, while the presentations are narrated by a text-to-speech engine that sounds ominously like a female HAL 9000…

…Like Qwiki, Storify is built on the insight that there is a whole lot of knowledge out there that doesn’t necessarily ‘belong’ to anyone. What the tool does, essentially, is allow users to shape narratives from social media (tweets, status updates and pictures) as a standalone page or as an embeddable object.

Recently, media outlets in the US have used Storify to chronicle the flurry of Twitter activity during the November 2 midterm elections. In a media environment that has relied on screenshots and awkward copying-and-pasting to tell the story of social media, the service is already demonstrating its value to publishers and bloggers.