Posts tagged stumbleupon

The Life Cycle of a Web Page on StumbleUpon

Via Cool Infographics:

Designed by Column Five Media, the infographic focuses on the half-life of a link and the length of time users view pages and interact with StumbleUpon.  This information shows that the half-life of a StumbleUpon link is much longer than other social media sites that were shared by bit.ly in September.

Select the images to embeggin.

The StumbleUpon blog has the full graphic with additional interesting bits.

In US, StumbleUpon Now Largest Driver of Site Traffic
Via GigaOm:

Web discovery engine StumbleUpon is now the biggest traffic driver among social media websites in the US, according to global web analytics service StatCounter. The company unseated Facebook at the top during June 2011, according to the latest StatCounter social media data. StatCounter tracks hits to over 3 million websites, and its social media data is gathered by analyzing every hit referred by a social media site.

In US, StumbleUpon Now Largest Driver of Site Traffic

Via GigaOm:

Web discovery engine StumbleUpon is now the biggest traffic driver among social media websites in the US, according to global web analytics service StatCounter. The company unseated Facebook at the top during June 2011, according to the latest StatCounter social media data. StatCounter tracks hits to over 3 million websites, and its social media data is gathered by analyzing every hit referred by a social media site.

New Life for Delicious?

Late last year the digerati groaned when an internal Yahoo presentation that hit the Webs indicated the social bookmarking site Delicious would be “sunsetted.”

Many hustled to export their links, migrating to Reddit and StumbleUpon. Others looked for Open Source solutions that would give them a sense of freedom should another company decide to shutter their bookmarking apps as well. (I signed up with freelish.us earlier this month but between Twitter, Tumblr and simply sending items to Evernote don’t feel the need to publicly bookmark that much anymore)

But Delicious might live to see another day once more. YouTube founders Chad Hurley and Steve Chen have bought the service. The question then is what they might do with it.

From the press release:

The YouTube founders plan to work closely with the community over the next few months to develop innovative features to help solve the problem of information overload. “We see this problem not just in the world of video, but also cutting across every information-intensive media type,” said Chen.

Will be interesting to see what they might do with the site. Social bookmarking was very big for some time but got seriously disrupted by the live, organic bookmarking that Twitter’s enabled. Digg’s been hit hard. But then again, StumbleUpon and Reddit claim tremendous growth.

That’s not to say that Delicious needs to explode in order to be successful. It is to say that it’s great that a company is committed to getting behind it and nurturing its community so that it may grow. —Michael

Referral Site StumbleUpon Sent 700M Pageviews to Online Publications in December

Did newspaper subscribers ever really pay for content, or were they just paying for the paperboy to deliver news to their homes?

Today fewer people are willing to pay for home delivery of the news and they can get only the information they want online, free, whenever they want it. Increasingly this news is coming from blogs and niche sites, or is steered to consumers through referral sites that curate the best of the Web.

Startups like, StumbleUponDigg and Reddit are playing an increasingly important role in the news business, driving huge traffic to content sites, and they are essentially becoming the paperboys of the 21st century. 

StumbleUpon in particular has seen remarkable growth in the past year, delivering 700 million pageviews to publishers in December, and increasing its own traffic 20 percent, according to TechCrunch.

This year Digg shed one third of its traffic, dropping from just shy of 8 million monthly viewers in December 2009 to 5.2 million viewers in November 2010, the last month for which Compete stats are available. Pageviews to StumbleUpon  grew 73 percent during 2010, clocking in almost 4 million visitors in November, according to Compete.

While the purpose of StumbleUpon is to generate traffic for other sites, Digg has long tried to capture traffic for itself,  before sending visitors offsite to the original content. This further masks the rise of StumbleUpon versus its competitor. And because much of StumbleUpon traffic is generated through its link shortener su.pr, which takes advantage of microblogging site Twitter, it employs multiple modes of generating traffic. 

However, audiences are even less loyal to link referral sites than they are to imperiled newspapers, as the saga of Digg illustrates. And just because people stumble onto content, it doesn’t mean they’re going to stay there, as the commenters on the TechCrunch story pointed out.

But while individual referral platforms may rise or fall, content creators should be working on strategies to leverage these trends, and get in on what amounts to a ton free traffic.