Posts tagged with ‘sudan’

Child Marriage: South Sudan

humanrightswatch:

This visually stunning short film tells the story of child marriage in South Sudan. According to government statistics, close to half (48 percent) of South Sudanese girls between 15 and 19 are married, with some marrying as young as age 12.

Read more after the jump.

FJP: Chilling. “This girl is the property of the family… If she still refuses [to get married], we will beat her and force her to get married.

I am depressed … without phone … money for rent … money for child support … money for debts … money!!! … I am haunted by the vivid memories of killings and corpses and anger and pain … of starving or wounded children, of trigger-happy madmen, often police, of killer executioners … I have gone to join Ken if I am that lucky.

-Part of the suicide note of Kevin Carter, a photojournalist and member of The Bang Bang Club.

I just finished watching the drama film The Bang Bang Club, about the real members, and started some research on what the journalists actually did. Kevin Carter took one of the most famous photographs in the world, that of a vulture preying on a starving girl in Sudan. Criticism for his inaction aside, it’s a powerful photo.

But what gets me is his suicide note. It’s just raw. I want to be a combat reporter, I want to try to cover things that Carter, Marinovich, and others have done. I just wonder how anyone can cope with seeing the horrors that humans inflict upon one another. I wonder if I can. I don’t so. (via nslayton)

FJP: Carter won the 1994 Pulitzer Prize in Feature Photography for this photo of a starving Sudanese girl with a vulture in the background. While he won photography’s top journalism award, he was heavily criticized for taking the picture and the image itself is seminal in debates surrounding journalism ethics. 

Carter killed himself in July 1994. He was 33. A New York Times obituary is here.

The Man Who Stayed Behind

(via The New York Times)

The Op-Ed columnist Nicholas D. Kristof talks with Ryan Boyette, a Florida man who braves bombs to document atrocities in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains.

Boyette:

There is no way we could have left and said we hope that you make it out on the other end of this okay. So we decided to stay and we decided to form a team and report what was happening.

Kristof:

To its credit, the Obama administration is working hard to end the food blockade in Nuba. But Boyette is skeptical, as am I, that the measures under consideration will be enough to avert starvation. If Boyette has anything to do with it, images of Nuba—courage, resilience, and suffering—will make it into American living rooms and build the political will for Washington and the world to take firm action.

5 minute video. Powerful work.

Photo of the Day: A Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) soldier stands in line during a rehearsal for the Independence Day ceremony in Juba, on July 5, 2011. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic).
Via the Atlantic:

Last Saturday, the Republic of South Sudan declared its independence, creating the newest nation in the world — the 193rd nation to join the United Nations. The new country has been in the making since a referendum last January, when nearly 4 million southern Sudanese voted to secede from Sudan by a margin of more than 98 percent. The region has been involved in civil wars for at least the past 50 years, and the days-old nation is already battling several armed groups within its new borders. Many issues still remain unresolved — the oil-rich region continues to rely on pipelines that run through Sudan, and a revenue-sharing agreement has not been reached. The new nation, which is comprised of more than 200 ethnic groups, has a largely rural economy, and poverty, civil warfare, and political instability will be the biggest of many challenges for the new administration. Gathered here are scenes from South Sudan as it made its debut on the world stage this weekend.

Check it: 35 images of a newly born nation.

Photo of the Day: A Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) soldier stands in line during a rehearsal for the Independence Day ceremony in Juba, on July 5, 2011. (Reuters/Goran Tomasevic).

Via the Atlantic:

Last Saturday, the Republic of South Sudan declared its independence, creating the newest nation in the world — the 193rd nation to join the United Nations. The new country has been in the making since a referendum last January, when nearly 4 million southern Sudanese voted to secede from Sudan by a margin of more than 98 percent. The region has been involved in civil wars for at least the past 50 years, and the days-old nation is already battling several armed groups within its new borders. Many issues still remain unresolved — the oil-rich region continues to rely on pipelines that run through Sudan, and a revenue-sharing agreement has not been reached. The new nation, which is comprised of more than 200 ethnic groups, has a largely rural economy, and poverty, civil warfare, and political instability will be the biggest of many challenges for the new administration. Gathered here are scenes from South Sudan as it made its debut on the world stage this weekend.

Check it: 35 images of a newly born nation.

PRI's The World: Technology

—Satellites for Humanity

Satellites for Humanity

PRI’s The World: Technology podcast recently ran a segment on how human rights organizations are using advanced technology to monitor abuses in hard to reach areas around the globe.

In this case, the Satellite Sentinel Project in Sudan has satellite confirmation of razed villages despite Sudanese denials of its occurrence.

The Satellite Sentinel Project was conceived by George Clooney to serve as an early warning system to avoid mass atrocities and operates through the collaboration companies, NGOs and academic institutions:

The project works like this: Commercial satellites passing over the border of northern and southern Sudan are able to capture possible threats to civilians, observe the movement of displaced people, detect bombed and razed villages, or note other evidence of pending mass violence.

UNOSAT leads the collection and analysis of the images and collaborates with Google and Trellon to design the web platform for the public to easily access the images and reports. Harvard Humanitarian Initiative provides system-wide research and leads the collection, human rights analysis, and corroboration of on-the-ground reports that contextualizes the satellite imagery. The Enough Project contributes field reports, provides policy analysis, and, together with Not On Our Watch, and our Sudan Now partners, puts pressure on policymakers by urging the public to act. DigitalGlobe provides satellite imagery and additional analysis.

Run Time: 2:52.