Posts tagged systems

What Happens in an Internet Minute
Via Intel:

In just one minute, more than 204 million emails are sent. Amazon rings up about $83,000 in sales. Around 20 million photos are viewed and 3,000 uploaded on Flickr. At least 6 million Facebook pages are viewed around the world. And more than 61,000 hours of music are played on Pandora while more than 1.3 million video clips are watched on YouTube.

All in all, that’s 625 terabytes of information sloshing about the tubes each minute.
If we do some math that’s 878.9 petabytes per day which is a bit difficult to wrap our mind around.
But if we convert that to the universal measurement of the MP3, we get the equivalent of about 235.9 billion songs passing through the internet and mobile networks each day.

What Happens in an Internet Minute

Via Intel:

In just one minute, more than 204 million emails are sent. Amazon rings up about $83,000 in sales. Around 20 million photos are viewed and 3,000 uploaded on Flickr. At least 6 million Facebook pages are viewed around the world. And more than 61,000 hours of music are played on Pandora while more than 1.3 million video clips are watched on YouTube.

All in all, that’s 625 terabytes of information sloshing about the tubes each minute.

If we do some math that’s 878.9 petabytes per day which is a bit difficult to wrap our mind around.

But if we convert that to the universal measurement of the MP3, we get the equivalent of about 235.9 billion songs passing through the internet and mobile networks each day.

Let's Pause for a Moment and Praise Tumblr's Engineers

We’re on Tumblr. If you’re reading this you’re (probably) on Tumblr.

And if you’re on Tumblr and we’re on Tumblr we have a shared history of great times, fun people and… unfortunate downtimes.

These don’t happen as much as they used to in our neck of the woods.

And that’s because Tumblr is scaling… everywhere.

As in, it gets 15 billion page views a month, has a peak rate of 40 thousand requests per second, collects more or less three terabytes of new content a day, all running on approximately one thousand servers.

And they’re doing this with about 20 engineers.

If you’re a geek, a friend of a geek, or simply sympathetic (and/or empathetic) to geeks that build platforms and keep them running so that the rest of us can do what we do, read High Scalability’s article on Tumblr’s architecture, its goals, and the hurdles it’s facing as it tries to reach those goals.

In it, Blake Matheny, Tumblr’s Distributed Systems Engineer, guides us through stats, software, hardware, architecture and lessons learned.

It’s mesmerizing, in a geeky sort of way.

In the meantime, it’s Valentines tomorrow. Consider sending the Tumblr crew a slew of hugs and kisses.