posts about or somewhat related to ‘tablets’

New Journalism Startup Combines News, Comics
Symbolia’s a new magazine that tells the news through illustrations. Sources are drawn, and quotes get their own speech balloons.
Their first issue is available for free download now, covering the Zambian Psychadelic Rock, Iraqi Kurds, zoology in the Congo and California’s Salton Sea. They feel, in most cases, like longform reads.
It’s really meant for iPads, though you can download a PDF version. Future issues will be priced at $1.99, and Symbolia plans to publish six a year. Android fans will have to wait, Symbolia people said today, but they’ll begin publishing Ebooks in the Android Marketplace.

New Journalism Startup Combines News, Comics

Symbolia’s a new magazine that tells the news through illustrations. Sources are drawn, and quotes get their own speech balloons.

Their first issue is available for free download now, covering the Zambian Psychadelic Rock, Iraqi Kurds, zoology in the Congo and California’s Salton Sea. They feel, in most cases, like longform reads.

It’s really meant for iPads, though you can download a PDF version. Future issues will be priced at $1.99, and Symbolia plans to publish six a year. Android fans will have to wait, Symbolia people said today, but they’ll begin publishing Ebooks in the Android Marketplace.

Disrupting Tablets from the Bottom Up
How a $20 tablet from India could blindside PC makers, educate billions and transform computing as we know it.
Hint: The Indian government currently has an order in for 100,000 Aakash 2 tablets for university students and professors, and Datawind, the company behind the low-priced Android tablet, already has 4 million pre-orders.
Image: Suneet Tuli, CEO Datawind, with the company’s Aakash 2 tablet. Via Quartz.

Disrupting Tablets from the Bottom Up

How a $20 tablet from India could blindside PC makers, educate billions and transform computing as we know it.

Hint: The Indian government currently has an order in for 100,000 Aakash 2 tablets for university students and professors, and Datawind, the company behind the low-priced Android tablet, already has 4 million pre-orders.

Image: Suneet Tuli, CEO Datawind, with the company’s Aakash 2 tablet. Via Quartz.

New Pew Report: More Mobile = More News Consumption
via paidContent:

The findings, conducted by the Pew Research Center and the Economist Group, were presented Monday at an advertising week event in New York. They showed that news was the second most popular activity after email on smartphones and tablets, and that people who used both types of devices were likely to consume more overall news than before.
In practice, this means that publishers are adapting to what Denise Warren of the New York Times calls the “multi-platform news user.” Warren says this user is likely to read the Times on a tablet in the morning and in the evenings, and to use their phone as an “interstitial” news device during the day.
Warren added that these trends have led the company to increase its engineering team by 40% in an effort to produce an optimal mobile experience for roving news consumers.

Read the full PDF of the report here.
FJP: Another interesting finding studying news consumption trends, also from Pew, shows that for American adults under 30, social media has surpassed newspapers and equaled TV as their primary source of daily news.
via Poynter:

The study found 33 percent of those young adults got news from social networks the day before, while 34 percent watched TV news and just 13 percent read print or digital newspaper content.

Images: Selection from the report.

New Pew Report: More Mobile = More News Consumption

via paidContent:

The findings, conducted by the Pew Research Center and the Economist Group, were presented Monday at an advertising week event in New York. They showed that news was the second most popular activity after email on smartphones and tablets, and that people who used both types of devices were likely to consume more overall news than before.

In practice, this means that publishers are adapting to what Denise Warren of the New York Times calls the “multi-platform news user.” Warren says this user is likely to read the Times on a tablet in the morning and in the evenings, and to use their phone as an “interstitial” news device during the day.

Warren added that these trends have led the company to increase its engineering team by 40% in an effort to produce an optimal mobile experience for roving news consumers.

Read the full PDF of the report here.

FJP: Another interesting finding studying news consumption trends, also from Pew, shows that for American adults under 30, social media has surpassed newspapers and equaled TV as their primary source of daily news.

via Poynter:

The study found 33 percent of those young adults got news from social networks the day before, while 34 percent watched TV news and just 13 percent read print or digital newspaper content.

Images: Selection from the report.

explore-blog:

The New Yorker’s answer to everyone pondering the future of reading.

FJP: The world needs more scrolls.

explore-blog:

The New Yorker’s answer to everyone pondering the future of reading.

FJP: The world needs more scrolls.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

discoverynews:

Bendable E-Reader Going Into Production
E-readers are a great tool, but the one big disadvantage is that they’re made of breakable glass and sensitive electronics that can get damaged when dropped. Books, by contrast, are pretty durable.
LG Display has brought flexible, light and tough e-readers a little closer to reality. The company announced that it is mass-producing a flexible electronic paper display, or EPD.
keep reading

FJP: Mmm… bendy.

discoverynews:

Bendable E-Reader Going Into Production

E-readers are a great tool, but the one big disadvantage is that they’re made of breakable glass and sensitive electronics that can get damaged when dropped. Books, by contrast, are pretty durable.

LG Display has brought flexible, light and tough e-readers a little closer to reality. The company announced that it is mass-producing a flexible electronic paper display, or EPD.

keep reading

FJP: Mmm… bendy.

The Economist + Pressly + Tumblr = Electionism

The Economist recently launched a 2012 presidential HTML5 site for tablets called Electionism and uses a nifty bit of MacGyvering to get it done.

It appears the Economist Group Media Lab is using Tumblr as a backend where they curate content from various news sources. These feed into Pressly, a startup that pulls RSS feeds and Twitter posts, and extracts the content contained within links for magazine-style tablet display.

Pictured above are various screens from a tablet display and includes the Electionism Home, Category, Twitter and articles. The site currently works on the iPad, Galaxy Tab and Kindle Fire.

Interested in following the actual Electionism Tumblr? That’s over here.

Select images to embiggen.

H/T: Journalism.co.uk.

You Can Do It on a Couch, You Can Do It on a Table
Image: Content shifting trends with tablets as reported by Google. Via ReadWriteWeb.

You Can Do It on a Couch, You Can Do It on a Table

Image: Content shifting trends with tablets as reported by Google. Via ReadWriteWeb.

Here’s an interview I did with Michael Dunn, CTO of Hearst Interactive Media, at the Streaming Media conference in Los Angeles a few weeks ago.

We cover everything from producing video for tablets, devices and mobile, to metadata and adaptive streaming.

To watch all video interviews from the conference, visit StreamingMedia.com

- Peter

Khoi Vinh: Magazines Are Failing at the iPad

Digiday interviewed former New York Times design director Khoi Vinh, who has been critical of publishers’ approaches to the iPad. 

How important is the emergence of HTML5 for tablet publishers? Can you see them gravitating towards browser-based experiences over apps as that technology becomes more robust?

There are two strains here. On the tech side, HTML5 is the way of the future. It’s too expensive to publish native apps for iOS, Android and all the different platforms. HTML5 is a much better delivery mechanism for this stuff than a native app. It’s much more affordable and much more portable. On the other side, though, it’s not just about the tech. I had underestimated how effective Apple’s AppStore would be in terms of distributing applications. You can’t beat that, so publishers will have to stay with apps for at least the immediate future.

To date, publishers seem to have focused on simply updating or transposing their print products for use on the device, but are they missing an opportunity in doing so? Should they be rethinking the way they deliver content from the ground up?

Absolutely. I just can’t see the end-to-end magazine format surviving. The Internet lets people consume media in a-la-carte form. To force a package of content on folks is unnatural. Some folks will continue to like the magazine format, but as social distribution becomes the way we discover and receive more of our content, it won’t make sense to sell it in these virtual boxes any more.

What possibilities should publishers be exploring, then?

One glaring omission in the way we package content for tablets is really relevance. Much like when you go to Amazon, they display similar products other people have bought; we don’t have anything nearly as good in realm of publishing. It’s not just recommendations, though. It’s about understanding true relevance. If you look at an app like Flipboard, that’s the one major thing it’s missing. The tech startup that can solve that problem will push forward this area of digital publishing in a big way.

Weigh in with your thoughts on publishers and their tablet strategies.

(Source: digiday.com)

A $35 Tablet? →

Via the BBC:

India has launched what it says is the world’s cheapest touch-screen tablet computer, priced at just $35 (£23).

Costing a fraction of Apple’s iPad, the subsidised Aakash is aimed at students.

It supports web browsing and video conferencing, has a three-hour battery life and two USB ports, but questions remain over how it will perform.

Officials hope the computer will give digital access to students in small towns and villages across India, which lags behind its rivals in connectivity.

At the launch in the Indian capital, Delhi, Human Resource Development Minister Kapil Sibal handed out 500 Aakash (meaning sky) tablets to students who will trial them.

He said the government planned to buy 100,000 of the tablets. It hopes to distribute 10 million of the devices to students over the next few years.

"The rich have access to the digital world, the poor and ordinary have been excluded. Aakash will end that digital divide," Mr Sibal said.

Sounds good. Almost too good. 

As the article goes on to note, similar efforts to bring low-priced computers to the poor have failed because the products have either been shoddy, or mass production never actually materialized.

iPad Photo Mag Doing Rev Share with Photographers
Via Wired’s Raw File:

There’s no denying it, photos look great on the iPad. So it makes sense that quite a few iPad-only photo magazines are cropping up to take advantage of its lush display and low digital overhead.
In particular, we’ve been watching Once Magazine. Over the last few months of its development, we’ve seen beta versions filled with thoughtful and provocative photo stories. On Oct. 6, the magazine is launching its first paid edition on iTunes for $3.
One thing that makes Once stand out from some of the other iPad photo mags is its revenue sharing model for its contributors. The founders, including San Francisco freelance photographer and CEO of Once, Jackson Solway, hope it will pave the way for photographers to start benefiting financially from the digital revolution instead of being crushed by it. It was a decision that the magazine’s executive editor, John Knight, describes as a “no-brainer.”
"When we realized we could know exactly how many subscribers we had on a given issue," says Knight, "it made it possible to calculate exactly how much each issue was making. The whole idea started as a way to pay photographers what they deserve for their work, and so splitting that revenue seemed obvious. Right now we only share that revenue with the photographers and we pay a fee to our writers. In the future we’d like to expand that model to include writers as well."

Image: A woman walks though the streets of Gali, Abkhazia. Ivor Prickett. 

iPad Photo Mag Doing Rev Share with Photographers

Via Wired’s Raw File:

There’s no denying it, photos look great on the iPad. So it makes sense that quite a few iPad-only photo magazines are cropping up to take advantage of its lush display and low digital overhead.

In particular, we’ve been watching Once Magazine. Over the last few months of its development, we’ve seen beta versions filled with thoughtful and provocative photo stories. On Oct. 6, the magazine is launching its first paid edition on iTunes for $3.

One thing that makes Once stand out from some of the other iPad photo mags is its revenue sharing model for its contributors. The founders, including San Francisco freelance photographer and CEO of Once, Jackson Solway, hope it will pave the way for photographers to start benefiting financially from the digital revolution instead of being crushed by it. It was a decision that the magazine’s executive editor, John Knight, describes as a “no-brainer.”

"When we realized we could know exactly how many subscribers we had on a given issue," says Knight, "it made it possible to calculate exactly how much each issue was making. The whole idea started as a way to pay photographers what they deserve for their work, and so splitting that revenue seemed obvious. Right now we only share that revenue with the photographers and we pay a fee to our writers. In the future we’d like to expand that model to include writers as well."

Image: A woman walks though the streets of Gali, Abkhazia. Ivor Prickett

curiositycounts:

The New York Times R&D Lab imagines the kitchen table of the future

They sure have a lot of money to play with. Looks like they were experimenting with new business models too.  

(via curiositycounts)

The iPad circa 1994, as envisioned by the Knight Ridder Information Design Lab in Boulder, CO.

Tablets will be a whole new class of computer. They’ll weigh under two pounds. They’ll be totally portable. They’ll have a clarity of screen display comparable to ink on paper. They’ll be able to blend text, audio, and graphics together. And they’ll be a part of our daily lives around the turn of the century. We may still use the computer to create information, but we’ll use the tablet to interact with information, reading, watching, listening.

The only problem with their tablet was that they were a decade and a half ahead of their earliest customers.

(Source: allthingsd.com)

Technological Innovation: A Publisher’s Dilemma

The news yesterday that newspaper giant Tribune Company is developing a tablet makes me wonder where and how publishers should technologically innovate.

The Tribune plans to offer subscribers free — or highly subsidized — tablets that will reportedly be built by Samsung. Many think the effort is already doomed for failure.

The plan reminds me of a recent Adweek article about the publishing industry’s ongoing woes with Content Management Systems. In it, Erin Griffith catalogues how BusinessWeek spent upwards of $20 million trying to create a social networking layer on top of its proprietary CMS; how Salon.com — which launched in the 90s — is still using the home-rolled CMS it used in the 90s but is reportedly migrating to WordPress; how Time, Inc. has worked on a home-brewed CMS for seven years but will probably abandon it; and how AOL spent three years trying to create a proprietary CMS before ditching the effort, buying Blogsmith for about $5 million and now trying to migrate to the Huffington Post’s highly customized version of Moveable Type.

Griffith writes:

Add a marketplace crowded with content-management options, tight budgets, and a string of media mergers—and the corresponding change in personnel—and the result is that these troublesome tools are being plied in a cultural clusterfuck. The result is a growing number of bloated, tangled CMS platforms reviled by the editors that publish on them, and the IT teams that maintain them.

That’s just the tip of the Content Management iceberg and doesn’t even begin to touch on the difficulties of creating a friction free workflow for multiple platforms (Web, print, mobile, tablet). In hindsight, it’s easy to say publishers shouldn’t have rolled their own. But with foresight does it make sense for Tribune to get into the tablet game?

The short answer is no, but that’s not to say news organizations should ignore in-house technical innovation.

Instead, it’s to ask how and where they should allocate resources in the pursuit of technological innovation. 

Part of the answer is remembering the core product, journalism, and then investing time and resources into technologies that enhance it. 

For example, technologists from the New York Times and ProPublica collaborated to create Document Cloud, a Web-based platform that allows organizations to analyze large data dumps across multiple documents. 

Document Cloud, in turn, uses Open Calais, a Web service developed by Thompson Reuters that layers semantic metadata over content.

These are innovative technological investments in the service of a publishers’ core news and information product.

Meanwhile, Tribune ramains in bankruptcy, is laying off editorial staff and is plowing human and financial capital into a product that will compete with the iPad, Kindle and other market leaders.

From this corner of the Internet, it seems an investment gone wrong. From another corner, Markus Pettersson, head of reader relations and social media at Göteborgs-Posten, writes that Tribune is “afraid, clueless and [has] lost track of what is [its] core product: journalism. It tells everyone including your readers and ad buyers that you have business ADHD, and cannot be relied on to focus on developing your core product: journalism.”

Agreed, and thinking we’ll be writing something very similar to Griffith’s Adweek CMS article a few years down the line. At that point in time, it will be Tribune as the poster boy for tech investment gone wrong.

Some might remember when ESPN tried to create a branded phone. Steve Jobs’ response at the time, “Your phone is the dumbest fucking idea I have ever heard.”

ESPN, it’s reported, lost $135 million on the venture.