Posts tagged tablets

Cupcake, Donut, Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread and now Honeycomb: these are the tasty names Google has given to Android releases since acquiring Android, Inc. in August 2005.
The platform’s gone bonkers in the mobile space ever since with a Nielsen report out today that says the Android OS has a 39 percent share of the US smartphone market. By comparison, Apple’s iOS has a 28 percent market share.
Android’s success is driven by that fact that much of the software stack it includes is released under an open source license, allowing phone makers to take it, augment it for their purposes and get to market.
So what about Honeycomb, the May release sepcifically optimized for tablets and large screen devices? Will Honeycomb do the same for tablets that its earlier flavors did for smartphones? 
Analysts don’t really think so. As John Gruber writes, unlike the iPhone which entered a crowded mobile market and fought for market share, the iPad created the tablet market.
Think tablets and you’re basically thinking iPad.
It will be tough for Android, or any other OS, to disrupt that mindshare.
Image: Detail from The Android Story by [x]cube Labs.

Cupcake, Donut, Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread and now Honeycomb: these are the tasty names Google has given to Android releases since acquiring Android, Inc. in August 2005.

The platform’s gone bonkers in the mobile space ever since with a Nielsen report out today that says the Android OS has a 39 percent share of the US smartphone market. By comparison, Apple’s iOS has a 28 percent market share.

Android’s success is driven by that fact that much of the software stack it includes is released under an open source license, allowing phone makers to take it, augment it for their purposes and get to market.

So what about Honeycomb, the May release sepcifically optimized for tablets and large screen devices? Will Honeycomb do the same for tablets that its earlier flavors did for smartphones? 

Analysts don’t really think so. As John Gruber writes, unlike the iPhone which entered a crowded mobile market and fought for market share, the iPad created the tablet market.

Think tablets and you’re basically thinking iPad.

It will be tough for Android, or any other OS, to disrupt that mindshare.

Image: Detail from The Android Story by [x]cube Labs.

Bjork’s upcoming Biophilia is being touted as an “album app” that will contain periodically released, dedicated apps for each song. 
In an interview with Evolver.fm, apps creator Scott Snibbe explains that the forward thinking innovation is actually a throwback to the days of vinyl. 

[I]n some reviews of [the first two tracks released in] Biophilia, people said, “Wow, I haven’t had this experience in 20 years. Before CDs came out, I’d buy an album and hold the 12-inch cover in my hand, sitting cross-legged on the floor while I listened to the music, read the liner notes, and looked at the pictures.” People used to have this very tactile, multimedia experience when they bought an album.
But with the digitization of music, we’ve lost that special moment. You can think of the app as, finally, that chance to unwrap the box and have a personal, intimate experience again with music. It might be the case that people spend a lot of time with the app when it first comes out [as they did with album covers] and then perhaps they’ll move on to purely enjoying the music after that. But we’ll really have to wait and see.

Publishers take note: replace music and vinyl with news and print, and the music industry Bjork might be teaching us something.
Image: art from the “Virus” song app.

Bjork’s upcoming Biophilia is being touted as an “album app” that will contain periodically released, dedicated apps for each song

In an interview with Evolver.fm, apps creator Scott Snibbe explains that the forward thinking innovation is actually a throwback to the days of vinyl

[I]n some reviews of [the first two tracks released in] Biophilia, people said, “Wow, I haven’t had this experience in 20 years. Before CDs came out, I’d buy an album and hold the 12-inch cover in my hand, sitting cross-legged on the floor while I listened to the music, read the liner notes, and looked at the pictures.” People used to have this very tactile, multimedia experience when they bought an album.

But with the digitization of music, we’ve lost that special moment. You can think of the app as, finally, that chance to unwrap the box and have a personal, intimate experience again with music. It might be the case that people spend a lot of time with the app when it first comes out [as they did with album covers] and then perhaps they’ll move on to purely enjoying the music after that. But we’ll really have to wait and see.

Publishers take note: replace music and vinyl with news and print, and the music industry Bjork might be teaching us something.

Image: art from the “Virus” song app.

Move Over Tote Bag, There's a Tablet in Town

Forget getting irrelevant swag with your newspaper subscription.

Via Adweek:

Publishers, desperate to prop up their legacy print business, have been scrambling to put their content on tablet devices. Now the Philadelphia Inquirer and its sibling Philadelphia Daily News are making what may be the boldest tablet push yet.

On July 11, the two papers plan to announce a pilot program under which they will sell Android tablets with their content already built in at a discount. Icons on the tablets’ home screen will take users to digital replicas of both newspapers as well as a separate Inquirer app and Philly.com, the papers’ online hub.

And here’s something for Philly-based news hackers:

[Greg] Osberg, a former worldwide publisher of Newsweek [and current CEO and publisher of Philadelphia Media Network], has made it his mission to speed the digital revolution at the Philly papers, which last year became the latest newspapers to go through bankruptcy. To that end, he’ll also be announcing an incubator program that’ll embed tech startups at the company to help it develop digital products. Later this fall, Philly.com will introduce paid, premium content on the site, and a hyperlocal news channel.

It’s not that far-fetched to imagine 20 to 25 percent of magazines’ readership existing in a digital platform three to four years from now.

Scott Dadich, Condé Nast’s vice president of digital magazine development, explaining the company’s tablet strategy.

Justin Ellis, Nieman Lab. Condé Nast’s Scott Dadich on reinventing mags for the iPad and why partnering with Apple matters.

perfectmarket:

kwayb:

“Please Turn Off your books”via @ The New Yorker

perfectmarket:

kwayb:

“Please Turn Off your books”
via @ The New Yorker

Mobile devices, led by the iPad and Android phones and tablets, have overtaken computers on Wi-Fi networks. In 2010, Windows and Mac OS X accounted for 64% of devices that accessed Wi-Fi networks, while iOS accounted for 32% and Android was just 1%. A year later, iOS and Android now represent 58% of Wi-Fi devices, while Windows and Mac OS X account for 36%. (source)

Funded: $9 Million For Pulse News Reader App For Tablets, Mobiles

How many newsrooms could pay their freelancers with that kinda dough?

Aaaaaand funnily enough, Reuters didn’t so much as report on this deal, as they syndicated the press release about it with the token disclaimer up top “Reuters is not responsible for the content in this press release.”

Sigh.

Less than Half of the Internet’s Top 500 Sites are Optimized for Mobile Devices
Via ReadWriteWeb:

In a study 500 of some of the top sites on the Internet, mobile performance consultants Blaze found less than half of the top destinations in the United States were optimized for smartphones
Of the Alexa 500 top sites in the U.S., 40% were optimized for smartphones (42% iOS, 38% Android). Yet, when it comes to Android, those 200 sites overwhelmingly returned the same page to both a smartphone and a tablet, meaning that developers have not rendered Android specific versions of their sites for Android tablets

What is this, 2008?

Less than Half of the Internet’s Top 500 Sites are Optimized for Mobile Devices

Via ReadWriteWeb:

In a study 500 of some of the top sites on the Internet, mobile performance consultants Blaze found less than half of the top destinations in the United States were optimized for smartphones

Of the Alexa 500 top sites in the U.S., 40% were optimized for smartphones (42% iOS, 38% Android). Yet, when it comes to Android, those 200 sites overwhelmingly returned the same page to both a smartphone and a tablet, meaning that developers have not rendered Android specific versions of their sites for Android tablets

What is this, 2008?

120 plays

scribemedia:

It’s Internet Week in New York and we had a chance to meet with Nielsen’s David Gill after he spoke on a panel called Marketing and Media Opportunities in the New Tablet Habit.

Topics in this Podcast:

  • Bringing a research angle to tablets with metrics and numbers.
  • Who are tablet owners and how is that changing.
  • What it means that tablet adoption is “normalizing” by moving behind the early adopters.
  • Who’s on what platform at what time of the day.

Run Time - 7:08

Ad Age: Will there be a Rolling Stone edition for the iPad?

Mr. Wenner: You can get it through Zinio or through our website and our archives are available on the website. At some point I’m sure it will be on the iPad but I’m not in any rush to break what I consider fundamental principles of what the magazine industry has to have and make a deal with Apple that will mortgage me into the future on the basis of getting 2,000 copies sold a month.

The future through the eyes of the past.

This 1994 Knight-Ridder Interface Design Lab video explores its efforts to create a tablet newspaper. Fun to see what they got right and what they got wrong in their digital forecasts.

Via PaleoFuture. The video’s available for download at the Open Video Project.

Run Time: 13:23.

My wife and daughter and I were sitting around the dinner table, talking about what kind of contract I would do next, and with what publisher. And my then eleven-year-old daughter said, “Daddy, why don’t you just self-publish?”

And I thought, wow, no one would have said something like that even a year ago. I mean, it used to be that self-publishing was what you did if you couldn’t get a traditional deal. And if you were really, really lucky, maybe the self-published route would lead to a real contract with a real publisher.

But I realized from that one innocent comment from my daughter that the new generation was looking at self-publishing differently. And that the question—“Should I self-publish?”—was going to be asked by more and more authors going forward. And that, over time, more and more of them were going to be answering the question, “Yes.”

Barry Eisler, a New York Times best selling author, recently turned down a $500,000 advance from a publisher in order to self-publish his next book.

In a lengthy Q&A with author Joe Konrath, Eisler explains how the legacy publishing system works, why he thinks self-publishing makes sense and what lessons both self and legacy publishers can learn from digitation of the publishing industry.
Adobe Proposes Standards for a More Designy Web
Adobe proposed new CSS standards to the World Wide Web Consortium, the international standards body for the Web, that would allow for more magazine-like layouts.
Called CSS Regions (PDF), the proposal is an attempt to break out of the typical grid layout that designers work within by creating a property called regions that aren’t constrained by geometry or position.
From the proposal:

CSS Multi-column Layout specification has pushed the limit of what is possible to achieve with CSS. However it still falls far short of the goal of representing typical magazine, newspaper, or textbook layouts in the digital space. This specification aims to close the remaining gap by giving content creators basic building blocks to express complex layouts. It does not aim to cover higher-level layout issues (e.g. allocating areas to fit all the content completely or placing areas on the page). These issues can be addressed by using either scripting or another CSS module.
The most obvious shortcoming of the CSS Multi-column layout is that columns are all of the same dimensions and placed next to each other. In more complex layouts, content can flow from one area of the page to next one without limitation of the area sizes and positions. For complex layouts, these areas need to be explicitly defined; in this specification they are called regions.

We noted the other day that Adobe released an FLV extraction tool called Wallaby that creates HTML, CSS and JavaScript versions of Flash animations, which is necessary for display on iOS devices such as the iPad and iPhone.
This proposal moves in the same direction by allowing designers to create complex layouts using Web standards instead of proprietary plugins and tools such as, say, Adobe’s Flash player.
Is the company cannibalizing itself then? Not really.
It’s still pushing forward with Flash Player 10.3 beta and last week previewed its 11.0 player. However, back in the print world it has InDesign and is pushing its adoption to create tablet ready apps. This was used, for example, to create digital magazines such as Wired and the New Yorker for the iPad.
If Adobe can get the proposed standards accepted, browsers will follow. And with that, they’ll have another tool at their disposal in their digital magazine publishing workflow. 

Adobe Proposes Standards for a More Designy Web

Adobe proposed new CSS standards to the World Wide Web Consortium, the international standards body for the Web, that would allow for more magazine-like layouts.

Called CSS Regions (PDF), the proposal is an attempt to break out of the typical grid layout that designers work within by creating a property called regions that aren’t constrained by geometry or position.

From the proposal:

CSS Multi-column Layout specification has pushed the limit of what is possible to achieve with CSS. However it still falls far short of the goal of representing typical magazine, newspaper, or textbook layouts in the digital space. This specification aims to close the remaining gap by giving content creators basic building blocks to express complex layouts. It does not aim to cover higher-level layout issues (e.g. allocating areas to fit all the content completely or placing areas on the page). These issues can be addressed by using either scripting or another CSS module.

The most obvious shortcoming of the CSS Multi-column layout is that columns are all of the same dimensions and placed next to each other. In more complex layouts, content can flow from one area of the page to next one without limitation of the area sizes and positions. For complex layouts, these areas need to be explicitly defined; in this specification they are called regions.

We noted the other day that Adobe released an FLV extraction tool called Wallaby that creates HTML, CSS and JavaScript versions of Flash animations, which is necessary for display on iOS devices such as the iPad and iPhone.

This proposal moves in the same direction by allowing designers to create complex layouts using Web standards instead of proprietary plugins and tools such as, say, Adobe’s Flash player.

Is the company cannibalizing itself then? Not really.

It’s still pushing forward with Flash Player 10.3 beta and last week previewed its 11.0 player. However, back in the print world it has InDesign and is pushing its adoption to create tablet ready apps. This was used, for example, to create digital magazines such as Wired and the New Yorker for the iPad.

If Adobe can get the proposed standards accepted, browsers will follow. And with that, they’ll have another tool at their disposal in their digital magazine publishing workflow. 

Yahoo introduces Livestand
Via Fast Company:

In the wake of AOL purchasing the Huffington Post and News Corp. unveiling The Daily, Yahoo is looking to regain some footing in the digital news marketplace. Today, the company introduced Livestand, a personalized digital newsstand for tablets and mobile phones.
According to Yahoo, the e-newsstand will “offer new content to consumers based on their interests.” It will be cross-platform, meaning publishers and advertisers can push content across a variety of devices, from the iPad to Android-based tablets. 
With this new product, Yahoo joins Apple, Google, and a growing number of tech giants who see potential profit in creating a centralized hub for digital news, similar to what iTunes did for digital music or the Kindle store for ebooks.

But Yahoo may also be taking aim at a different, fast-growing competitor in this field: Flipboard. The “personalized, social magazine” platform for the iPad pulls content from around the web based on your interests and social graph—and Yahoo’s Livestand riffs on that same idea.

The platform will offer content based on “interests, time of day, and location,” as well as “social interactions.” Yahoo promises the service will cut through the “noise of the web” to deliver personalized content—heck, the word “personalized” crops up roughly a half-dozen times throughout the press release.

Yahoo introduces Livestand

Via Fast Company:

In the wake of AOL purchasing the Huffington Post and News Corp. unveiling The Daily, Yahoo is looking to regain some footing in the digital news marketplace. Today, the company introduced Livestand, a personalized digital newsstand for tablets and mobile phones.

According to Yahoo, the e-newsstand will “offer new content to consumers based on their interests.” It will be cross-platform, meaning publishers and advertisers can push content across a variety of devices, from the iPad to Android-based tablets.

With this new product, Yahoo joins Apple, Google, and a growing number of tech giants who see potential profit in creating a centralized hub for digital news, similar to what iTunes did for digital music or the Kindle store for ebooks.

But Yahoo may also be taking aim at a different, fast-growing competitor in this field: Flipboard. The “personalized, social magazine” platform for the iPad pulls content from around the web based on your interests and social graph—and Yahoo’s Livestand riffs on that same idea.

The platform will offer content based on “interests, time of day, and location,” as well as “social interactions.” Yahoo promises the service will cut through the “noise of the web” to deliver personalized content—heck, the word “personalized” crops up roughly a half-dozen times throughout the press release.