Posts tagged with ‘targeting’

Facebook Ad Targeting
Inspired by Felix Salmon’s post yesterday on how untargeted his Facebook ads are I decided to take a look at what they’re feeding me.
As you can see, the ads don’t even come close to relevant, which surprises seeing how much information they have about anyone who even moderately uses the site.
As Felix wrote: “This, my friends, is the next-generation hyper-targeted marketing platform which makes Facebook worth $100 billion. Or, you know, not.”
Slow clap. — Michael
Select image to embiggen

Facebook Ad Targeting

Inspired by Felix Salmon’s post yesterday on how untargeted his Facebook ads are I decided to take a look at what they’re feeding me.

As you can see, the ads don’t even come close to relevant, which surprises seeing how much information they have about anyone who even moderately uses the site.

As Felix wrote: “This, my friends, is the next-generation hyper-targeted marketing platform which makes Facebook worth $100 billion. Or, you know, not.”

Slow clap. — Michael

Select image to embiggen

Tracking How Politicians Target Us
If companies use finely tuned analytics to serve us ads and send us targeted messages it’s no surprise that politicians do so too. But what exactly those messages are, and how they differ by demographic and region, is something ProPublica wants to figure out.In March, ProPublica created the Message Machine to track Obama campaign emails. Now they’ve expanded its scope to track all politicians and relaunched it.
via ProPublica:

Voters have little way of knowing how much a campaign knows about them, how the messages they’re receiving differ from the messages that other voters are sent, or what these differences might reveal about a campaign’s priorities.
Sasha Issenberg, a journalist who has done extensive reporting on campaigns’ new uses of data and analytics, said the Obama campaign is leading the way. It takes a rigorous approach to testing the effectiveness of different messages, tracking results based not only on the message content but also the name given as the sender of the email, the subject line, the format, even the date and time of day the messages are sent.

FJP: Wondering about how submissions would be verified (e.g. someone manipulating the wording or message in an e-mail sent in to ProPublica) Michael sent an e-mail to Jeff Larson to find out more. Here’s the scoop:

We have a bunch of systems in place to make sure they are real campaign emails. I’ll give you a few examples: Our software automatically checks to see if the email is like any emails we’ve ever seen from each campaign, and if it is wildly different we ignore it. This is similar to how traditional spam detection works. We also have an industry standard spam detector in place to filter out straight spam. We also have a bunch of monitoring checks in place, and if we see a fake/imposter email sneak through we can quickly delete it from our database.

Jeff also explained why the project is important overall:

It’s not widely covered, but political campaigns are using very sophisticated “big data” techniques to optimize their message and influence voters. I hope this project helps uncover how this part of political campaigning works. Campaigns are putting a lot of resources into micro-targeting, we thought it was worth watching how it works and how it’s being put into action.  Learning exactly what the campaigns are saying to whom, may reveal inconsistencies in their messages or other surprising trends.

Image: Screenshot of the Message Machine e-mail.
Bonus: Read up a bit more on targeting here and here.

Tracking How Politicians Target Us

If companies use finely tuned analytics to serve us ads and send us targeted messages it’s no surprise that politicians do so too. But what exactly those messages are, and how they differ by demographic and region, is something ProPublica wants to figure out.

In March, ProPublica created the Message Machine to track Obama campaign emails. Now they’ve expanded its scope to track all politicians and relaunched it.

via ProPublica:

Voters have little way of knowing how much a campaign knows about them, how the messages they’re receiving differ from the messages that other voters are sent, or what these differences might reveal about a campaign’s priorities.

Sasha Issenberg, a journalist who has done extensive reporting on campaigns’ new uses of data and analytics, said the Obama campaign is leading the way. It takes a rigorous approach to testing the effectiveness of different messages, tracking results based not only on the message content but also the name given as the sender of the email, the subject line, the format, even the date and time of day the messages are sent.


FJP: 
Wondering about how submissions would be verified (e.g. someone manipulating the wording or message in an e-mail sent in to ProPublica) Michael sent an e-mail to Jeff Larson to find out more. Here’s the scoop:

We have a bunch of systems in place to make sure they are real campaign emails. I’ll give you a few examples: Our software automatically checks to see if the email is like any emails we’ve ever seen from each campaign, and if it is wildly different we ignore it. This is similar to how traditional spam detection works. We also have an industry standard spam detector in place to filter out straight spam. We also have a bunch of monitoring checks in place, and if we see a fake/imposter email sneak through we can quickly delete it from our database.

Jeff also explained why the project is important overall:

It’s not widely covered, but political campaigns are using very sophisticated “big data” techniques to optimize their message and influence voters. I hope this project helps uncover how this part of political campaigning works. Campaigns are putting a lot of resources into micro-targeting, we thought it was worth watching how it works and how it’s being put into action.  Learning exactly what the campaigns are saying to whom, may reveal inconsistencies in their messages or other surprising trends.


Image:
Screenshot of the Message Machine e-mail.

Bonus: Read up a bit more on targeting here and here.

[Facebook just became even creepier] This month — and for the first time — Facebook started to mine real-time conversations to target ads. The delivery model is being tested by only 1% of Facebook users worldwide. On Facebook, that’s a focus group 6 million people strong.

The closest Facebook has come to real-time advertising has been with its most recent ad offering, known as sponsored stories, which repost users’ brand interactions as an ad on the side bar. But for the 6 million users involved in this test, any utterance will become fodder for real-time targeted ads.

For example: Users who update their status with “Mmm, I could go for some pizza tonight,” could get an ad or a coupon from Domino’s, Papa John’s or Pizza Hut.

— Irina Slutsky has a story on AdAge how the big sell-out of users on social networks continues, moving into real-time mining and targeting.  (via sheuer)

(via sheuer-deactivated20130201)

Guide to Delivering Audio to Mobile Audiences →

Melissa Ulbricht, 2009 Knight News Challenge Winner, creates a handy guide at MediaShift’s Idea Lab.

"There are quite a few projects,” she writes, “that disseminate audio content using the voice channel”

  • Freedom Fone, a Knight News Challenge winner, was deployed at two farm radio stations in Africa.
  • Gaon ki Awaaz provides listeners in rural India with audio content twice a day in their native language.
  • Avaaj Otalo lets farmers call in and listen to archived radio broadcasts in rural India.
  • Geocell and Radio Greenwave in the country of Georgia make short broadcasts available to listeners if they dial a specified number.
  • Listeners can call in to hear podcasts in the United States.
  • In India, Bubbly allows content providers to upload messages that can be broadcast to a list of followers. Listeners can follow audio content from Bollywood celebrities.

View her guide at Idea Lab.