Posts tagged technique

Central Park Time Lapse

The FJP dedication to craft award goes to Jamie Scott who chose 15 locations throughout Central Park and returned to them to shoot around sunrise two days a week for six months.

The stunning result captures the park’s ever changing color.

H/T: Colossal

One of These is Not Like the Other

Photo tampering is nothing new. Over the last 10 years astute observers caught news organizations and politicians doctoring images. Take for example, Reuters and the manipulated photos it published by Adnan Hajj during the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict; conservative operatives releasing a doctored photo in 2004 of John Kerry and Jane Fonda together at an anti-war rally; or any number of photos found in glossy magazines.

Even Adobe recognizes the troubles Photoshop can cause and in 2008 started work on a photo authentication plugin.

If only it were so easy.

In this video we see a new Japanese pop sensation, Aimi Eguchi of the girl band AKB 48. Thing is, she isn’t real.

Via Singularity Hub:

This past Sunday, Ezaki Glico, the candy company which aired the commercial, confirmed what many of AKB 48’s fans had come to suspect: Aimi Eguchi wasn’t real. The new group member, it turns out, was a computer-generated composite of the real band members. Her pretty face was actually made up of the “best features” of six other members: her eyes, nose, mouth, hair/body, face outline and eyebrows were not flesh-and-blood, but cut-and-paste.

Can’t tell who in the video is fake? Click through to see who Aimi is and how Ezaki Glico created the new composite character.

Photographer Peter Langenhahn compresses time in his panoramas by combining hundreds of photos from a shoot into a final image.

For example, a photo of every foul committed during a soccer match, or a basketball composite where twenty players simultaneously run, jump and shoot on the court.

Jon Stewart and Bill Moyers on the art of the interview, part 01.

In which they discuss the difference between providing context and amnesty, and how the immediate is not always the most important.

Part 02 is here.

Run Time: 4:53.

120 plays

An audio collage — or postcard — is a great technique for capturing the resonant ambience of that which you’re reporting on.

WNYC’s Brian Lehrer used it yesterday as he explored potential Republican presidential candidates for the 2012 election. (For those outside the United States, our election cycle is an endless processional that begins pretty much after the last once ends.)

If my ears are tuned correctly I think the sound bites run thus: Donald Trump, Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich, Michelle Bachman, Haley Barbour, Mike Huckabee, Sarah Palin and, I think, Tim Pawlenty.

Did I get it right?

Yesterday we highlighted the work of Norwegian filmmaker Terje Sorgierd.

Today, we return to another of his shorts.

Called The Market, it documents Bangkok’s Maeklong Market and a railway that runs right through it. As Sorgierd explains:

[C]ontrary to what you might see in the United States and in other parts of the world, there was no eminent domain law forcing market vendors to move.

The result? Every single day the Maeklong Railway line passes through Maeklong – 8 times a day, 7 days per week. The train literally runs directly through the middle of the market, forcing vendors to pull back their awnings and wares while shoppers find a place to step off of the track that serves as their only walkway.

Beside being visually stunning, I post because I think Sorgierd does an incredible job documenting location with image, texture and human expression. The soundtrack is nice, of course, but it goes to show that we can get a deep sense of place without actually using words.

We’re partial to a certain shamrock flavored basketball team but how’s this for sports photography?
Photo District News explores how AP photographer Morry Gash got the shot:

So how’d Gash get the wide-angle shot? Well, he was actually just focusing his Canon 1D Mark IV on Lebron at the time.

“The camera I was shooting with was a longer lens,” Gash said. “I was following the ball and I was on LeBron.”

Meanwhile, at Gash’s feet was his Canon 5D Mark II with a wide-angle lens which was synced to the Mark IV and fired automatically by radio remote. It was the wide shot that was the winner.

“To be honest,” Gash said, “I had no idea Dwyane Wade even did that.”

We’re partial to a certain shamrock flavored basketball team but how’s this for sports photography?

Photo District News explores how AP photographer Morry Gash got the shot:

So how’d Gash get the wide-angle shot? Well, he was actually just focusing his Canon 1D Mark IV on Lebron at the time.

“The camera I was shooting with was a longer lens,” Gash said. “I was following the ball and I was on LeBron.”

Meanwhile, at Gash’s feet was his Canon 5D Mark II with a wide-angle lens which was synced to the Mark IV and fired automatically by radio remote. It was the wide shot that was the winner.

“To be honest,” Gash said, “I had no idea Dwyane Wade even did that.”