Posts tagged with ‘traffic’

Metropolis II by Chris Burden

Chris Burden spent four years re-creating the urban landscape with Metropolis II, a model city with 1,200 cars passing through it.

Via Singularity Hub:

Information may be the fuel of the modern city, but traffic is its blood. Chris Burden’s massive model Metropolis II pays respects to the never ending flow of urban autos by circulating 1200 hundred die-cast cars through its 18 lanes. Burden estimates that the sculpture moves 100,000 toy cars through its tracks every hour! Metropolis II is Hot Wheels writ large, and it is awesome. Coming this Fall to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)…

My can’t-connect-this-to-journalism-but-need-to-post-FJP-Tumble-of-the-Day post. — Michael

Welcome to New York. Please look both ways before you cross the street.

Created by Ron Gabriel for Masters Thesis called Three Way Street:

By summer 2010, the expansion of bike lanes exposed a clash of long-standing bad habits — such as pedestrians jaywalking, cyclists running red lights, and motorists plowing through crosswalks. The old habits exacerbate attempts to expand ways to use our streets; existing disfunction makes change more difficult.

My master’s thesis project at SVA focused on one intersection as a case study. The video aims to show our interconnected role in improving the safety and usability of our streets. The campaign is named ‘3-Way Street’ and is made up of a poster series, a video and website.

I believe the intersection is Park and 28th.

Who’s the mightiest of them all?
Via Journalism.co.uk:

The Mail Online could become the most popular news website in the world as bosses predict 70 million unique users will be reported for May.
In March the Mail Online overtook the Huffington Post to become the world’s second most read news website.
Bosses of the parent company, the Daily Mail and General Trust, made the announcement during the release of the company’s half-yearly results this morning.

Who’s the mightiest of them all?

Via Journalism.co.uk:

The Mail Online could become the most popular news website in the world as bosses predict 70 million unique users will be reported for May.

In March the Mail Online overtook the Huffington Post to become the world’s second most read news website.

Bosses of the parent company, the Daily Mail and General Trust, made the announcement during the release of the company’s half-yearly results this morning.

Where We Got Our News: Bin Laden Death Announcement.
Forbes’ Eric Savitz has the breakdown on the numbers for the Web’s largest news day in the past three years.
Yahoo lead all news sources with 26,783,058 site visits while MSNBC saw a 257% traffic spike from the previous Monday.
Reuters’ Felix Salmons analyzes the numbers as well, writing:

At the same time, however, it’s only reasonable to assume that a significant proportion of the online population really does go straight to Yahoo News when something’s breaking. Note too the fact that four of the top six sites in the list are the online arms of TV networks, and that all of the top seven sites are either TV networks or web-native sites.
The lesson is clear: when big news breaks, people flock to TV. And when they’re online, they still flock to TV, or else they go to the main sites they think of for providing good fast web-native news. Other news sites, like NYT and WaPo, are lucky just to break into the top ten. They’re very good at what they do. But the broad population still doesn’t think of them as being real-time in the way that TV and the web are.

Analytics Source: Experian Hitwise.
Update: To clarify — and in response to Peter's astute observation — this shows how the ten most visited sites stack up against each other.

Where We Got Our News: Bin Laden Death Announcement.

Forbes’ Eric Savitz has the breakdown on the numbers for the Web’s largest news day in the past three years.

Yahoo lead all news sources with 26,783,058 site visits while MSNBC saw a 257% traffic spike from the previous Monday.

Reuters’ Felix Salmons analyzes the numbers as well, writing:

At the same time, however, it’s only reasonable to assume that a significant proportion of the online population really does go straight to Yahoo News when something’s breaking. Note too the fact that four of the top six sites in the list are the online arms of TV networks, and that all of the top seven sites are either TV networks or web-native sites.

The lesson is clear: when big news breaks, people flock to TV. And when they’re online, they still flock to TV, or else they go to the main sites they think of for providing good fast web-native news. Other news sites, like NYT and WaPo, are lucky just to break into the top ten. They’re very good at what they do. But the broad population still doesn’t think of them as being real-time in the way that TV and the web are.

Analytics Source: Experian Hitwise.

Update: To clarify — and in response to Peter's astute observation — this shows how the ten most visited sites stack up against each other.

Where’s our traffic coming from?
Outbrain, the content discovery platform found on sites from Slate to the Chicago Tribune, recently analyzed Internet traffic across its network to answer just that.
Via Outbrain:

[We] looked at traffic patterns  from 100 million sessions across more than 100 premium publishers that are currently using our platform to see how readers are accessing content, where they’re finding it and how they’re engaging with that content. 

Key findings:
While search still reigns supreme in terms of directing traffic to content pages (41% of external referrers), social is gaining share at 11%.
Of the six content verticals examined, stories in the news, entertainment and lifestyle categories are the most likely to receive traffic from social sources.
Traffic coming from social media sources has the highest tendency to bounce.
Readers who go from one content site to another (i.e. USA Today to The Daily Beast) are most likely to be engaged in what they’re reading, presumably because they are already in content consumption mode.
Facebook delivers a more diverse audience than Twitter.
Outbrain suggests their findings may be skewed towards news and enterntainment because those are the types of publishers they work most with.
Still though, good to see “the news” at the front of the pack every once in a while.

Where’s our traffic coming from?

Outbrain, the content discovery platform found on sites from Slate to the Chicago Tribune, recently analyzed Internet traffic across its network to answer just that.

Via Outbrain:

[We] looked at traffic patterns  from 100 million sessions across more than 100 premium publishers that are currently using our platform to see how readers are accessing content, where they’re finding it and how they’re engaging with that content. 

Key findings:

  • While search still reigns supreme in terms of directing traffic to content pages (41% of external referrers), social is gaining share at 11%.
  • Of the six content verticals examined, stories in the news, entertainment and lifestyle categories are the most likely to receive traffic from social sources.
  • Traffic coming from social media sources has the highest tendency to bounce.
  • Readers who go from one content site to another (i.e. USA Today to The Daily Beast) are most likely to be engaged in what they’re reading, presumably because they are already in content consumption mode.
  • Facebook delivers a more diverse audience than Twitter.

Outbrain suggests their findings may be skewed towards news and enterntainment because those are the types of publishers they work most with.

Still though, good to see “the news” at the front of the pack every once in a while.

poynterinstitute:

NYTimes.com page views declined between 11 and 30 percent in the 12-day period following the pay wall launch, compared to the 12-day period preceding it. Visits declined during the same period, according to an analysis done by Heather Dougherty, director of research at Hitwise.

poynterinstitute:

NYTimes.com page views declined between 11 and 30 percent in the 12-day period following the pay wall launch, compared to the 12-day period preceding it. Visits declined during the same period, according to an analysis done by Heather Dougherty, director of research at Hitwise.

Via Craig Labovitz/Arbor Networks:

A graph of Libya traffic by application (TCP and UDP port groupings) over the month of February. The top graph shows only Web and the bottom the top five other applications. Beginning on Friday (February 18), Internet traffic suffered several multi-hour outages followed by a continuing 60-80% reduction in traffic impacting all Internet applications. All data comes from more than 100 ATLAS ISP participants.

Via Craig Labovitz/Arbor Networks:

A graph of Libya traffic by application (TCP and UDP port groupings) over the month of February. The top graph shows only Web and the bottom the top five other applications. Beginning on Friday (February 18), Internet traffic suffered several multi-hour outages followed by a continuing 60-80% reduction in traffic impacting all Internet applications. All data comes from more than 100 ATLAS ISP participants.

How we share what we share.
The Atlantic’s Alexis Madrigal looks at data from ShareThis, the company that makes the ubiquitous “share this” button you see on Web sites, to see how people spread the word about Hosni Mubarak’s resignation. 

While the Twitter and Facebook shares have the same rough shape, the details are interesting. Twitter sharing is much spikier, possibly driven by subevents in the overall narrative. And during the key hour in which Mubarak resigned, Twitter and Facebook sharing came very close to intersecting. Turning to the Facebook graph, you realize how big a beast the site really is. Its pattern conforms roughly to U.S. web traffic as a whole, peaking around 1:00 p.m.

How we share what we share.

The Atlantic’s Alexis Madrigal looks at data from ShareThis, the company that makes the ubiquitous “share this” button you see on Web sites, to see how people spread the word about Hosni Mubarak’s resignation. 

While the Twitter and Facebook shares have the same rough shape, the details are interesting. Twitter sharing is much spikier, possibly driven by subevents in the overall narrative. And during the key hour in which Mubarak resigned, Twitter and Facebook sharing came very close to intersecting. Turning to the Facebook graph, you realize how big a beast the site really is. Its pattern conforms roughly to U.S. web traffic as a whole, peaking around 1:00 p.m.

How Did the Mail Online Become the World's Second Biggest Newspaper Web Site →

Just how did this middle-range tabloid’s website rise from relative obscurity to become the second most popular newspaper site in the world, and the most popular news site in the UK?

Martin Clarke, Mail Online’s executive, credits his rapidly increasing traffic to his acceptance and incorporation of online social networks, specifically Facebook and Twitter, into his marketing strategy.  Recent data (from Nathalie Broizat) shows that 10% of Mail Online’s UK traffic arrives via Facebook referrals.

(Source: soupsoup)