Posts tagged with ‘translation’

Bing Now Translates Klingon Language 
Bing has just added Klingon, the language spoken by the Klingon warrior race of the Star Trek universe, to its language translator.
Via Mashable: 

Bing worked with the linguistics Ph. D. Marc Okrand who developed the language for the series. It also turned to 10 people who are fluent in the language to train the systems, as well as the Klingon Language Institute who assisted in the process.

Bing users can now even translate entire websites into Klingon.
FJP: I think I speak for everyone when I say: HIja’ tlhuchtlh! - Krissy
Image: Today I Found Out

Bing Now Translates Klingon Language 

Bing has just added Klingon, the language spoken by the Klingon warrior race of the Star Trek universe, to its language translator.

Via Mashable

Bing worked with the linguistics Ph. D. Marc Okrand who developed the language for the series. It also turned to 10 people who are fluent in the language to train the systems, as well as the Klingon Language Institute who assisted in the process.

Bing users can now even translate entire websites into Klingon.

FJP: I think I speak for everyone when I say: HIja’ tlhuchtlh! - Krissy

Image: Today I Found Out

A translator is a professional schizophrenic, continuously wandering on the edge, risking his sanity in the crashing zone of two languages and two cultures. He is operating in an elevated state of mind, as if in trance––indeed, it is a creative trance, a state of bipolarity, of being at two places simultaneously, moving parallel in two worlds. In this sense, he is an exotic stranger, an itinerant of the ever-growing literary world. Invisibly, condemned to solitude, he enters this atypical state of awareness, becomes a trance-later.

— Zoltán Pék (via xiuho)

(Source: archipelagobooks, via penamerican)

El Caso de Narrative.ly →

fjp-latinamerica:

Hey there. We have good news for all of those who have inquired about why we keep posting only in English: from now on, we will be periodically posting special entries, written entirely in Spanish, with original content generated by us here at the Future Journalism Project. De nada.

FJP: In August we launched FJP Latin America to explore what’s happening in Spanish language media. The idea is to bring those observations back to an English speaking audience (with, of course, links back to the original Spanish-language sources).

But now we have a twist. José and Roberto will occasionally translate what we’re doing in English to Spanish. It’s all kind of meta but we think meta for a good cause. Our recent interview with Narratively founder Noah Rosenberg is our start.

To read it in Spanish, visit FJP Latin America. And to read future Spanish language coverage, bookmark the En Español tag.

Wink and a nudge: You should follow them too. Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

And just wait until we get other regions up and running. We’ll have translations of translations of translations. Good times. — Michael

Fans of Douglas Adams’ Hitchkiker’s Guide to the Galaxy are well familiar with the Babel Fish. “Small, yellow and leech-like,” if you stick it in your ear “you can instantly understand anything in any form of language.”

This is why first AltaVista and now Yahoo used the term for their respective translation services (read another way, Yahoo bought Altavista and then discontinued it, but its BabelFish translator remains alive.) 

But where Altahoo requires text input, Google has been working on something entirely different: Speech to text translation. 

In 2010, Google launched its translation services, and in a generous nod to the spoken language offered voice input. 

Building on top of that, Google also offered “Conversation Mode” between Spanish and English so that people speaking the two languages could more or less engage one another. That is, say, “Hola, ¿cómo estás?” into your Android device and it spits out a computerized voice saying, “Hello, how are you?”

Respond with, “I am fine, thank you,” and “Estoy bien, gracias,” comes out the other end. While imperfect in its capabilities, Spanish and English speakers can each more or less converse with one another.

This week Google announced that more languages are coming to Conversation Mode, namely Czech, Russian, Turkish, Japanese and Mandarin among others. 

Sure it will be clunky at times, and yes awkward translations will lead to awkward situations, but what’s interesting about the technology and the solution is that it learns as it goes along. The more it’s used the more it begins to understand accents, and regional and language nuances.

So pick it up and give it a try. Laugh at its absurdities but also understand that someday, maybe, we’ll no longer need to look to science fiction and stick Babel Fish in our ears.

Ever want to read what the non-English press is talking about around the world? Say, for example, the local press in North Africa and the Middle East over the past few months.
Enter Newspaper Map, it combines Google Maps and Google Translate to present the world’s online news sources all in one place. 

Ever want to read what the non-English press is talking about around the world? Say, for example, the local press in North Africa and the Middle East over the past few months.

Enter Newspaper Map, it combines Google Maps and Google Translate to present the world’s online news sources all in one place.