Posts tagged with ‘tsunami’

theeconomist:

Less than an hour after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, the country’s phone system was at capacity and Japanese citizens were unable to contact their loved ones or emergency hotlines. What did the Japanese do? They turned to Twitter. Dick Costolo, chief executive of Twitter, discusses how Twitter saved lives that day, in this video from The Economist’s Ideas Economy events series.

Photographs from Fukushima
Last week we wrote about Japan’s Memory Salvage Project, a beautiful volunteer initiative that seeks to restore some of the 750,000 found photographs collected in the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami.
If you’re in New York next month, Aperture is exhibiting some of the images as part of a show that started in Japan and then moved to Los Angeles.
In an interview with the New Yorker, project lead Munemasa Takahashi explains:

After the disaster occurred, the first thing the people who lost their loved ones and houses came to look for was their photographs. Only humans take moments to look back at their pasts, and I believe photographs play a big part in that. This exhibit makes us think of what we have lost, and what we still have to remember about our past.

The photographs will be on display at the Aperture Foundation from April 2 through April 27.

Photographs from Fukushima

Last week we wrote about Japan’s Memory Salvage Project, a beautiful volunteer initiative that seeks to restore some of the 750,000 found photographs collected in the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami.

If you’re in New York next month, Aperture is exhibiting some of the images as part of a show that started in Japan and then moved to Los Angeles.

In an interview with the New Yorker, project lead Munemasa Takahashi explains:

After the disaster occurred, the first thing the people who lost their loved ones and houses came to look for was their photographs. Only humans take moments to look back at their pasts, and I believe photographs play a big part in that. This exhibit makes us think of what we have lost, and what we still have to remember about our past.

The photographs will be on display at the Aperture Foundation from April 2 through April 27.

The Memory Salvage Project

When Japanese defense forces cleared debris from the 2011 tsunami, they came across 750,000 photographs that they collected and saved.

Now a group of volunteers called the Memory Salvage Project is cleaning and restoring each photo, one by one.

Images: Stills from a video by the Discovery Channel. Click through to watch.

Select an image to embiggen.

Before, meet After
The Daily Mail is running a series of before and after pictures of Japan’s cleanup efforts three months post-tsunami.
Above: A ship swept away by the raging torrents lies among other debris on March 12, left, while a man on a bicycle pedals past a pedestrian on the same road June 4, 2011 in Miyako, Iwate Prefecture, north-eastern Japan.

Before, meet After

The Daily Mail is running a series of before and after pictures of Japan’s cleanup efforts three months post-tsunami.

Above: A ship swept away by the raging torrents lies among other debris on March 12, left, while a man on a bicycle pedals past a pedestrian on the same road June 4, 2011 in Miyako, Iwate Prefecture, north-eastern Japan.

Panoramic Image of Kesennuma, Japan

Definitely recommend hitting the embiggen button.

For other panoramas, visit MSNBC’s Photoblog.

In this week’s Studio 360, Kurt Anderson explores Japanese popular culture and its take on disaster, from historical Godzilla films to contemporary artists drawing popular Manga characters pitching in to help with tsunami relieft.
Via Studio 360:

There’s a reason why Japanese horror movies come to mind in the middle of this catastrophe. Disasters — natural and man-made — have marked Japan for centuries.  And they’ve become powerful (and popular) archetypes in Japanese culture: from the most famous image in Japanese art, Hokusai’s Great Wave, to the post-apocalyptic anime film Akira. Japanese pop culture has been deeply affected by what Susan Sontag called “the imagination of disaster”

The segment can be listened to (and downloaded) here.
Somewhat related: the New York Times Op Art page has illustrations by three Japanese artists that reflect on the tsunami and its aftermath. 

In this week’s Studio 360, Kurt Anderson explores Japanese popular culture and its take on disaster, from historical Godzilla films to contemporary artists drawing popular Manga characters pitching in to help with tsunami relieft.

Via Studio 360:

There’s a reason why Japanese horror movies come to mind in the middle of this catastrophe. Disasters — natural and man-made — have marked Japan for centuries.  And they’ve become powerful (and popular) archetypes in Japanese culture: from the most famous image in Japanese art, Hokusai’s Great Wave, to the post-apocalyptic anime film Akira. Japanese pop culture has been deeply affected by what Susan Sontag called “the imagination of disaster”

The segment can be listened to (and downloaded) here.

Somewhat related: the New York Times Op Art page has illustrations by three Japanese artists that reflect on the tsunami and its aftermath. 

Quake moved Japan coast 8 feet, shifted Earth’s axis. — CNN
Images released by NASA show Japan’s northeast coast before, left, and after flooding from the quake-induced tsunami.

Quake moved Japan coast 8 feet, shifted Earth’s axis. — CNN

Images released by NASA show Japan’s northeast coast before, left, and after flooding from the quake-induced tsunami.

Got a Site? Help Japan With A Code Snippet →

We did this, we think you should too.

Via world-shaker:

If you run your own site — and we know lots of you do — you can use your pageviews and influence to help Japanese people struggling to recover from yesterday’s devastating natural disasters. All you need is a couple lines of code from the Hello Bar.

We showed off the Hello Bar a while ago; it’s a slender bar that floats at the top of your website, giving visitors a brief message and a link.

Best of all, you only have to insert the code snippet on your site once. From a convenient web dashboard, you can customize the bar with your colors and text. You can also tweak the behaviors of the bar and easily turn it on or off from the dashboard. All of this makes it incredibly easy to solicit donations for Japan now, then turn the bar off or change the message and link later, if you so desire.

That code can be used on a Tumblr, WordPress or Blogger blog, too; here are some detailed instructions.

NOTE: Hello Bar requires registration if you want to change the settings, but this Mashable article gives you the code to put in your Tumblr description if you want to bypass that. After signing up with just your name, email, and “company,” it’ll ask you for a Beta Key. Use “helpjapan”.

The caveat is that the open/close buttons on Hello Bar will occupy the same space as the Follow/Unfollow Block buttons in the top right corner. You can change this if you can change the Hello Bar settings to display those buttons on the left (which again, requires registration).

It’s as easy as selecting Customize on your Tumblr, selecting Theme, selecting Use Custom HTML and pasting the code snippet all the way at the bottom just before the </body> tag. 

Takes two minutes. 

We linked ours to the Red Cross

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

When I saw this photo of jumbled cargo containers from The Political Notebook, I thought it looked like so many toy building blocks.
BigBoxCar then posted this photo of tumbled planes and cars and I&#8217;m reminded again of how small and toylike this is against the size and scale within which it occurred.
So I went hunting, and came across the same photo Karl posted. This time though, it&#8217;s been tilt-shifted.
I&#8217;m simultaneously drawn and horrified by them all. — Michael

When I saw this photo of jumbled cargo containers from The Political Notebook, I thought it looked like so many toy building blocks.

BigBoxCar then posted this photo of tumbled planes and cars and I’m reminded again of how small and toylike this is against the size and scale within which it occurred.

So I went hunting, and came across the same photo Karl posted. This time though, it’s been tilt-shifted.

I’m simultaneously drawn and horrified by them all. — Michael

Visualizing Tsunami wave height as it crossed the Pacific.
As released yesterday by the NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory:

Model runs from the Center for Tsunami Research at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory show the expected wave heights of the tsunami as it travels across the Pacific basin. The largest wave heights are expected near the earthquake epicenter, off Japan.

Visualizing Tsunami wave height as it crossed the Pacific.

As released yesterday by the NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory:

Model runs from the Center for Tsunami Research at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory show the expected wave heights of the tsunami as it travels across the Pacific basin. The largest wave heights are expected near the earthquake epicenter, off Japan.

Propagation Animation of the Honshu Tsunami across the Pacific towards North and South America.

Via NOAA Center for Tsunami Research:

Propagation of the March 11, 2011 Honshu tsunami was computed with the NOAA forecast method using MOST model with the tsunami source inferred from DART® data. From the NOAA Center for Tsunami Research, located at NOAA PMEL in Seattle, WA

Another in a day of speechless.