Posts tagged tv

Staring at Screens
katiecouric:

Glass: How much time the world spends staring at screens

FJP — And via Quartz, with some context.

As we’ve argued, media are best understood as a competition for attention on glass-panelled devices connected to the internet. Phones, tablets, PCs, television sets—it’s all just glass. But, of course, it does matter what kinds of glass are attracting more attention.

Having said that, let’s not forget that in the majority of the world it’s radio, not glass, that remains king.

Staring at Screens

katiecouric:

Glass: How much time the world spends staring at screens

FJP — And via Quartz, with some context.

As we’ve argued, media are best understood as a competition for attention on glass-panelled devices connected to the internet. Phones, tablets, PCs, television sets—it’s all just glass. But, of course, it does matter what kinds of glass are attracting more attention.

Having said that, let’s not forget that in the majority of the world it’s radio, not glass, that remains king.

Mapping 400,000 Hours of US TV News
Via the Internet Archive:

We are excited to unveil a couple experimental data-driven visualizations that literally map 400,000 hours of U.S. television news. One of our collaborating scholars, Kalev Leetaru, applied “fulltext geocoding” software to our entire television news research service collection. These algorithms scan the closed captioning of each broadcast looking for any mention of a location anywhere in the world, disambiguate them using the surrounding discussion (Springfield, Illinois vs Springfield, Massachusetts), and ultimately map each location. The resulting CartoDB visualizations provide what we believe is one of the first large-scale glimpses of the geography of American television news, beginning to reveal which areas receive outsized attention and which are neglected….
…What you see here represents our very first experiment with revealing the geography of television news and required bringing together a bunch of cutting-edge technologies that are still very much active areas of research. While there is still lots of work to be done, we think this represents a tremendously exciting prototype for new ways of interacting with the world’s information by organizing it geographically and putting it on a map where it belongs!

There are two ways to explore the visualization: one is to watch news mentions of different places in the world each day, the other is to select a TV station and time window and see what it reported on.
Related: This former librarian single-handedly taped 35 years of TV news. This one’s well worth the read. Marion Stokes recorded Philadelphia news stations from 1977 - 2012, and a batch of the 140,000 VHS tapes she produced is being digitized by The Internet Archive.
Image: Screenshot, TV News Archive, via the Internet Archive. Select to embiggen.

Mapping 400,000 Hours of US TV News

Via the Internet Archive:

We are excited to unveil a couple experimental data-driven visualizations that literally map 400,000 hours of U.S. television news. One of our collaborating scholars, Kalev Leetaru, applied “fulltext geocoding” software to our entire television news research service collection. These algorithms scan the closed captioning of each broadcast looking for any mention of a location anywhere in the world, disambiguate them using the surrounding discussion (Springfield, Illinois vs Springfield, Massachusetts), and ultimately map each location. The resulting CartoDB visualizations provide what we believe is one of the first large-scale glimpses of the geography of American television news, beginning to reveal which areas receive outsized attention and which are neglected….

…What you see here represents our very first experiment with revealing the geography of television news and required bringing together a bunch of cutting-edge technologies that are still very much active areas of research. While there is still lots of work to be done, we think this represents a tremendously exciting prototype for new ways of interacting with the world’s information by organizing it geographically and putting it on a map where it belongs!

There are two ways to explore the visualization: one is to watch news mentions of different places in the world each day, the other is to select a TV station and time window and see what it reported on.

Related: This former librarian single-handedly taped 35 years of TV news. This one’s well worth the read. Marion Stokes recorded Philadelphia news stations from 1977 - 2012, and a batch of the 140,000 VHS tapes she produced is being digitized by The Internet Archive.

Image: Screenshot, TV News Archive, via the Internet Archive. Select to embiggen.

China Forces Removal of Unapproved Satellite Dishes in Tibet

Via The Tibet Post:

Chinese officials continued their crackdown on access to foreign media in Tibet on March 10 through the dismantling of satellite dishes at the Labrang Tashi Kyil monastery in Labrang erea (Gansu province), Amdho region, eastern Tibet.

Observed as the official ‘Uprising Day’, March 10 is the 54th anniversary of the Tibetan uprising in Lhasa, rallies are held worldwide on this day n support of the Tibetan cause.  

Monastery administration was ordered to remove and then burn their satellite dishes. They were then told these should be replaced, alongside new receivers, with smaller state sanctioned ones. These new devices only receive state controlled programmes; thereby blocking Tibetans from obtaining international media.  

These new receivers are fitted with an automatic recorder and camera which are used as surveillance devices by the Chinese government television control office. If phrases such as “Free Tibet” of “His Holiness the Dalai Lama” are detected on this device then the officials are alerted and sanctions are carried out.

Earlier in January, Chinese authorities confiscated televisions and dismantled satellite equipment from 300 monasteries in the western part of the region. Cash rewards were announced for anyone informing the authorities about Tibetans holding back ‘illegal’ devices. Arrests and fines are imposed on those who are found to have such devices in their possession.

FJP: About 100 Tibetans have self-immolated themselves since 2009 in protest against human rights conditions and China blames foreign influence for the continued practice.

For example, in February, it accused the US-backed Voice of America of encouraging immolations. A charge the State Department denies.

When Television Graphics Go Bad
"We are mortified this appeared during our 5 pm news broadcast," said Jeff Harris, KMGH-TV News Director. “The editor pulled the image of the book cover from the Internet without realizing it had been doctored.  We sincerely regret the error and have corrected the story to avoid any recurrence of its broadcast. We are following up internally as well to avoid a repeat of this inexcusable oversight.”
FJP: Yes, beware pulling images from the Internet. 
KMGH is an ABC affiliate based in Denver, Colorado.
Via TalkingPointsMemo.

When Television Graphics Go Bad

"We are mortified this appeared during our 5 pm news broadcast," said Jeff Harris, KMGH-TV News Director. “The editor pulled the image of the book cover from the Internet without realizing it had been doctored.  We sincerely regret the error and have corrected the story to avoid any recurrence of its broadcast. We are following up internally as well to avoid a repeat of this inexcusable oversight.”

FJP: Yes, beware pulling images from the Internet. 

KMGH is an ABC affiliate based in Denver, Colorado.

Via TalkingPointsMemo.

This is pure comedy…

The problem with canned TV news

Local TV-news stations across the country seem to think their viewers are having trouble with overwhelming tides of email.

It should come as no surprise that local TV news stations use a lot of canned material from syndicators. TImes are tough, and budgets thin. But a video montage aired on “Conan” last week, which has since gone viral, shows just how pervasive the practice has become, and just how indiscriminate many stations are about which reports they choose to air.

This was host Conan O’Brien’s lead-in last Tuesday night: “A lot of people think that Super Tuesday is the big story of the day. Well, judging by local news, apparently there’s an even bigger story that’s sweeping the nation right now.” The montage was then shown, with about 30 different anchors asking: “Could this be the end of email overload?” The report focuses on Shortmail, a program created by a company called 410 Labs. The product, which has been called “Twitter for email,” promises to solve the supposed “overload” problem by limiting emails to 500 characters.

At least 225 stations aired the report. It was produced by CNN Newsource, which is sort of like an Associated Press for TV news (and which, like Fortune, is owned by Time Warner (TWX)). The montage included the introductions to 30 of those reports. The hilarity grew as the well-coiffed anchors’ identical intros piled up. The report has the benefit of meeting the minimum definition of “real news.” Meaning, it wasn’t a video news release dressed up to look like an actual report; nor was it stealth product placement presented as news.

Read the entire story at Fortune.

Why I Want to Quit Cable

Designing For 5 Screens: PC, Mobile, TV & More
 
Finally, Nielsen touches on 3 emerging areas of usability: TVs, very small screens (such as items with embedded RFID chips) and very large screens (such as smart buildings). According to Nielsen, each will need its own UI.
Most companies won’t need to focus on designing for the 3 emerging screen types. Television is the one most likely to need attention in the near future. Currently, writes Nielsen, “designing for TV is relevant primarily for companies in the entertainment or consumer electronics industries.” However he thinks that if interactive TV usability “improves substantially,” then more companies will need to pay attention to that platform.
Mobile and desktop are the 2 user experiences that most companies need to worry about. The other 3 are dependent on what industry you’re in. Regardless of how many screens targeted, Nielsen recommends that companies factor in these two things: create “separate and distinct UI designs for device categories that are sufficiently different” and retain the feel of a product family across devices.

 
Via RWW’s Richard MacManus

Designing For 5 Screens: PC, Mobile, TV & More

Finally, Nielsen touches on 3 emerging areas of usability: TVs, very small screens (such as items with embedded RFID chips) and very large screens (such as smart buildings). According to Nielsen, each will need its own UI.

Most companies won’t need to focus on designing for the 3 emerging screen types. Television is the one most likely to need attention in the near future. Currently, writes Nielsen, “designing for TV is relevant primarily for companies in the entertainment or consumer electronics industries.” However he thinks that if interactive TV usability “improves substantially,” then more companies will need to pay attention to that platform.

Mobile and desktop are the 2 user experiences that most companies need to worry about. The other 3 are dependent on what industry you’re in. Regardless of how many screens targeted, Nielsen recommends that companies factor in these two things: create “separate and distinct UI designs for device categories that are sufficiently different” and retain the feel of a product family across devices.

Via RWW’s Richard MacManus

scribemedia:

Shazam For TV wants to use its technology to create interactive ads. 

Shazam for TV isn’t aiming to tell you that you’re watching The Simpsons the same way it tells you that you’re listening to The Beatles. Instead, the company has partnered with brands like Honda, Starbucks and Paramount Pictures to use its sound-identifying technology to create interactive ads.

read more at Mashable

Getting Connected. Years it took to reach 50 million users on different platforms.
Image: Lucinda Albers via Flickr/Creative Commons

Getting Connected. Years it took to reach 50 million users on different platforms.

Image: Lucinda Albers via Flickr/Creative Commons