posts about or somewhat related to ‘venezuela’

Today’s Front Pages From the Americas

New York Post (bottom center) still keeping it classy.

Images: Via the Newseum. Select to embiggen.

fjp-latinamerica:

Photographing the street gangs of Caracas
TIME magazine’s Vaughn Wallace delivers a noteworthy photo essay based on the work of Caracas-based photojournalist Oscar B. Castillo.
Asked about how was it like to put his life at risk by meddling with gang members in their own territory, Castillo explained:

I felt safer when I was with the gangs than when I hung around the city by myself. The people took care of me and protected me in risky situations. 
When I told one of the guys involved in gang violence about the story, he told me to talk about their bad situation…to tell the kids that inside gang life, there’s no life at all.

Image: A gang member poses with a gun in Caracas, by Oscar Castillo. Via Time LightBox.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

fjp-latinamerica:

Photographing the street gangs of Caracas

TIME magazine’s Vaughn Wallace delivers a noteworthy photo essay based on the work of Caracas-based photojournalist Oscar B. Castillo.

Asked about how was it like to put his life at risk by meddling with gang members in their own territory, Castillo explained:

I felt safer when I was with the gangs than when I hung around the city by myself. The people took care of me and protected me in risky situations. 

When I told one of the guys involved in gang violence about the story, he told me to talk about their bad situation…to tell the kids that inside gang life, there’s no life at all.

Image: A gang member poses with a gun in Caracas, by Oscar Castillo. Via Time LightBox.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

CPJ: Venezuela’s private media wither under Chávez assault

fjp-latinamerica:

The CPJ just released a special report on how Venezuela has used a combination of legal and illegal maneuvers to break down the country’s independent, private media, including non traditional outlets, such as websites.

According to the New York based NGO, Hugo Chavez desire to control what is published in the country has extended to the Internet. Under current legislation, for example, government officials can order Internet Service Providers to restrict websites that violate controls.

From CPJ’s report:

… It curbs electronic media content according to the time of the day, with adult content reserved for shows after midnight, including violent or sexual content and soap operas—and news images of violence.

Chavez efforts to put more controls on what news outlets can publish is more a result of the President desire to curb freedom of expression and threat critics of the regime, than a candid concern about the quality of the content audiences in Venezuela are being exposed to.

FJP: El Universal and El Nacional newspapers have lost all government advertsising, another measure to put pressure on independent news outlets.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

reuters:

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez shows the pistols of independence hero Simon Bolivar during a ceremony to mark the his birthday in Caracas July 24, 2012.
Chavez unveiled a 3D image of South America’s 19th century independence hero Bolivar on Tuesday, based on bones he had exhumed two years ago to test a theory that Bolivar was murdered. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
FULL FOCUS: The best Reuters images from the past 24 hours

FJP: Hugo being Hugo.

reuters:

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez shows the pistols of independence hero Simon Bolivar during a ceremony to mark the his birthday in Caracas July 24, 2012.

Chavez unveiled a 3D image of South America’s 19th century independence hero Bolivar on Tuesday, based on bones he had exhumed two years ago to test a theory that Bolivar was murdered. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

FULL FOCUS: The best Reuters images from the past 24 hours

FJP: Hugo being Hugo.

Creating the Newsroom, Literally

I can amuse myself watching time-lapse videos on just about anything but this one, following the construction of Venezuela’s Cadena Capriles’ new integrated newsroom, is a joy to follow.

The company publishes three newspapers and several magazines, and its new building brings print and online journalists together in a 3,300 square foot newsroom.

"You are watching a ‘one kitchen, several restaurants’ concept," explains Juan Antonio Giner, President of Innovation Media Consulting, in an email to the FJP. “It’s a 300 people newsroom sharing services and resources, producing first class relevant content for 3 newespapers, radio and magazines under one open space roof in a state of the art facility.”

Time once was that reporters were separated across floors in buildings, or in different buildings completely. Here were the print reporters, over there those that worked on the web, somewhere else entirely those that worked on television and radio. By bringing them all together, the hope is to increase collaboration and reduce redundant costs.

In 2008, the World Editors Forum and Reuters released a study that surveyed editors and news executives from 120 countries about their vision for the future of the newsroom. At the time, 86% of respondents believed integrated newsrooms similar to what Cadena Capriles has created here would be the norm.

"Multimedia output is better served with multimedia input sharing resources," explains Giner on the trend. Call it integrated, call it convergence, it’s a recognition that no matter the end delivery platform, news organizations need to have all their resources together and collaboratively pulling in the same direction.

Venezuela needs more ways like this

IsaiasElias writes

Hi, we are writing you fron Caracas, Venezuela, a litlle oil nation in South America but with big problems about the journalism. If the people don’t now, we placed third in the growdth of Twitter and the users stars to use this social media to do citizen journalism about sport or Internet Activity.

Some How, if your staff needs writters that report what happends in this hemisphere, i would like to offers especific information.

I´m a multimedia journalist from “El-Nacional” newspaper. Please keep this way to promote the Digital Jourlalism and news alternative channel to express the “truth”.

Good luck

We respond: Hola, y muchas gracias por ponerse en contacto con el Proyecto sobre el Periodismo del Futuro.

Podemos empezar diciendo que nos fascina Venezuela. Sin embargo, admitimos nuestra ignorancia sobre su país puesto que lo que sabemos se debe a algunos días que pasamos en Caracas, así como a través de los venezolanos que hemos conocido alrededor del mundo y lo que leemos en la prensa estadounidense.

Usted menciona que Venezuela tiene grandes problemas en lo que se refiere al ejercicio del periodismo. Efectivamente, de acuerdo a lo que leemos y escuchamos eso es muy cierto.

Pero lo que entendemos sobre el ambiente mediático bajo el régimen de Chavez pasa por muchos filtros y nos encantaría saber mas sobre la situación a través de personas que vivan ahí.

Si pudiera compartir sus opiniones con nosotros se lo agradeceríamos mucho.

And once for good measure in English: Hello and thank you for reaching out to us at the Future Journalism Project.

Can we start by saying that we love Venezuela. We admit our ignorance though as most of what we know is from time spent in Caracas, meeting Venezuelans in various parts of the world and what we read here in North America.

You say that Venezuela has big problems with journalism. Yes, from what we read and hear that is very true. But what we understand about  the media environment under Chavez  comes through many filters so we’d love to hear more from people who are actually there.

If you can share your perspective we would be very grateful.