Posts tagged with ‘visualization’

Global Literacy

Today’s International Literacy Day and UNESCO reports that “there are still 781 million adults and 126 million youth who cannot read or write a simple sentence.”

Via UNESCO (PDF): 

The lowest literacy rates are observed in sub-Saharan Africa and in South and West Asia. Adult literacy rates were below 50% in the following 14 countries: Afghanistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Sierra Leone… It is important to note that regional averages can mask disparities at the country level. This is most apparent in sub-Saharan Africa, where the adult literacy rate ranges from 15% in Niger to 95% in Equatorial Guinea. 

The UN group has an “eAtlas of Literacy" that lets visitors browse and export maps and data to explore global literacy rates and regional indicators.

Images: Adult and Youth literacy rates, via UNESCO (PDF). Select to embiggen.

nprfreshair:

It has been a slow week of reruns, so this happened. 

FJP: Looks familiar but we love your questions so ask away.

nprfreshair:

It has been a slow week of reruns, so this happened. 

FJP: Looks familiar but we love your questions so ask away.

(via npr)

The Art of Swimming

The unfortunate, unofficial end of the summer comes to the US this Labor Day Weekend. With that in mind, a visual explainer from 1587.

Via The Public Domain Review:

Illustrations from Everard Digby’s De Arte Natandi (The Art of Swimming) published in 1587, considered the first English treatise on the practice. Divided into two parts, the first is largely theoretical (Digby wrote in Latin, though it would be translated into English by Christopher Middleton eight years later). The second part is concerned with practical demonstration borne out in a series of 40 beautiful woodcuts, all composed from five landscape blocks into which swimmers in various positions have been placed. The work was hugely influential, not just providing a practical guide to staying afloat and different strokes but also in its attention to issues of safety. As the Wellcome Library blog notes: “The work is alive to the dangers of swimming outdoors: Digby makes careful note of the safest methods of entering rivers, warning against jumping in feet first (particularly if the water has a muddy bottom to which your feet would stick) and advocating a slow and patient entry. Swimmers are also advised to have a companion with them, to help if they get into difficulties.

Images: The Art of Swimming, by Everard Digby, via The Public Domain Review. View the complete set on Flickr. Select to embiggen.

Mapping Perspective
Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…
…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.
Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

Mapping Perspective

Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…

…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.

Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

Mapping Online Reaction to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Al Jazeera has an animated timeline map of prominent hashtags used on Twitter during the ongoing Gaza conflict.

The map runs from June 17 to July 17 and covers hashtags such as #BringBackOurBoys (when three Israelis disappeared while hitchhiking), #MohammadAbuKhdair (when a Palestinian teenager was killed in Jerusalem) and, of course, #IsraelUnderFire and #GazaUnderAttack.

Select to embiggen and view the color key for the screenshots above, or, better, read through to watch the timeline unfold. 

Some context: We’ve written before about PR and propaganda surrounding the Gazan war. Here are a few more:

  • New York Times: At Front Lines, Bearing Witness in Real Time.
  • The Economist: Us and Them — The pummelling of Gaza has cost Israel sympathy not just in Europe, but also among Americans.
  • Quartz: Twitter hashtags are finally neutralizing the Israeli government’s propaganda.
  • CNN Reliable Sources: Red News/Blue News — the Middle East PR war.

Geek notes: The timeline map was put together with CartoDB’s Oddyssey.js.

Universal Converter Box
Via xkcd.

Universal Converter Box

Via xkcd.

Middle East Friendship Chart
Via Slate. Read through to select cells for relationship information. Select to embiggen. 

Middle East Friendship Chart

Via Slate. Read through to select cells for relationship information. Select to embiggen. 

Who Owns Media (US Edition)

Via Gizmodo, which also includes graphics on what brands own what consumer goods, consolidation in financial markets, what auto makers own what cars, and what breweries make what beer… which is important.

Images: Studios and media companies (top), and TV stations (bottom). Select to embiggen.

What’s in a Flop: “Injuries” and Writhing Time at the World Cup

What’s in a Flop: “Injuries” and Writhing Time at the World Cup

Words, Lyrically Speaking
Via Matt Daniels:

Literary elites love to rep Shakespeare’s vocabulary: across his entire corpus, he uses 28,829 words, suggesting he knew over 100,000 words and arguably had the largest vocabulary, ever.
I decided to compare this data point against the most famous artists in hip hop. I used each artist’s first 35,000 lyrics. That way, prolific artists, such as Jay-Z, could be compared to newer artists, such as Drake.

So, Aesop Rock is the most verbacious, DMX the least and were Shakespeare penning his stuff nowadays, he’d fall somewhere among the members of Wu-Tang Clan.
Read through for Daniels’ analysis and methodology.
Image: Screenshot, # of Unique Words Used Within an Artist’s First 35,000 Lyrics, by Matt Daniels. Select to embiggen.
H/T: Reddit.

Words, Lyrically Speaking

Via Matt Daniels:

Literary elites love to rep Shakespeare’s vocabulary: across his entire corpus, he uses 28,829 words, suggesting he knew over 100,000 words and arguably had the largest vocabulary, ever.

I decided to compare this data point against the most famous artists in hip hop. I used each artist’s first 35,000 lyrics. That way, prolific artists, such as Jay-Z, could be compared to newer artists, such as Drake.

So, Aesop Rock is the most verbacious, DMX the least and were Shakespeare penning his stuff nowadays, he’d fall somewhere among the members of Wu-Tang Clan.

Read through for Daniels’ analysis and methodology.

Image: Screenshot, # of Unique Words Used Within an Artist’s First 35,000 Lyrics, by Matt Daniels. Select to embiggen.

H/T: Reddit.

Religious Harassment Around the World
The Pew Research Center put together this visualization on the social harassment of religious groups around the world. Harassment includes physical or verbal assaults, arrests, detentions, desecration of holy sites, and discrimination in housing, employment or education. The study is based on public data from the U.S. State Department, the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, the U.N., Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, among others.
2012 saw an increase in religious hostilities in every major region of the world except the Americas. These include a number of particular social hostilities such as:
Abuse of religious minorities by private individuals or groups in society for acts perceived as offensive or threatening to the majority faith of the country (as in Egypt, Libya and Sri Lanka)
Violence or the threat of violence to compel people to adhere to religious norms (as in India, Vietnam and Somalia)
Harassment of women over religious dress (as in China and Moldova)
Mob violence related to religion (as in Kenya, Indonesia and Nigeria)
Sectarian violence (as in China, Myanmar and Syria)
Read through the report here.

Religious Harassment Around the World

The Pew Research Center put together this visualization on the social harassment of religious groups around the world. Harassment includes physical or verbal assaults, arrests, detentions, desecration of holy sites, and discrimination in housing, employment or education. The study is based on public data from the U.S. State Department, the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, the U.N., Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, among others.

2012 saw an increase in religious hostilities in every major region of the world except the Americas. These include a number of particular social hostilities such as:

  • Abuse of religious minorities by private individuals or groups in society for acts perceived as offensive or threatening to the majority faith of the country (as in Egypt, Libya and Sri Lanka)
  • Violence or the threat of violence to compel people to adhere to religious norms (as in India, Vietnam and Somalia)
  • Harassment of women over religious dress (as in China and Moldova)
  • Mob violence related to religion (as in Kenya, Indonesia and Nigeria)
  • Sectarian violence (as in China, Myanmar and Syria)

Read through the report here.

navigatingmedia:

How to Communicate Visually 
For all you visualizaton junkies, (or really just anyone who dares to make an infographic), a fantastic free e-book from Column Five Media on visual communication (applicable to designers, editors, advertisers or academics). Image is a screenshot from the book, which you can download here.

navigatingmedia:

How to Communicate Visually 

For all you visualizaton junkies, (or really just anyone who dares to make an infographic), a fantastic free e-book from Column Five Media on visual communication (applicable to designers, editors, advertisers or academics). Image is a screenshot from the book, which you can download here.

A House Divided
A lobbying firm took data from the National Journal’s annual congressional voter ratings to compare liberal Republicans and conservative Democrats. From top to bottom, we have 1982 to 2013.
The Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza attributes the polarization to redistricting, with the parties effectively creating safe voting districts. But, as he points out, the Senate is equally partisan:

More intriguing — and harder to explain — is how the middle has dropped out of the Senate, which is not subject to redistricting. Because senators represent entire states, self-sorting should be less powerful…
…[M]ore than half of the Senate fit between the most liberal Republican and the most conservative Democrat in 1982. For the last two years, there has not been a single Republican with a more liberal voting record than any Democrat and not a single Democrat with a more conservative voting record than any Republican. Not one.

Cillizza does the math: In 1982, 75 percent of congress fell into an ideological middle. Today, .7 percent does. Read through for the rest and to view the Senate chart.

A House Divided

A lobbying firm took data from the National Journal’s annual congressional voter ratings to compare liberal Republicans and conservative Democrats. From top to bottom, we have 1982 to 2013.

The Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza attributes the polarization to redistricting, with the parties effectively creating safe voting districts. But, as he points out, the Senate is equally partisan:

More intriguing — and harder to explain — is how the middle has dropped out of the Senate, which is not subject to redistricting. Because senators represent entire states, self-sorting should be less powerful…

…[M]ore than half of the Senate fit between the most liberal Republican and the most conservative Democrat in 1982. For the last two years, there has not been a single Republican with a more liberal voting record than any Democrat and not a single Democrat with a more conservative voting record than any Republican. Not one.

Cillizza does the math: In 1982, 75 percent of congress fell into an ideological middle. Today, .7 percent does. Read through for the rest and to view the Senate chart.

The Internet is a Series of Tubes
Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata from the Oxford Internet Institute map the world’s submarine fibre-optic cables to appear like the London’s Tube Map (PDF). But they also go a few steps further.
Via Information Geographies

For the sake of simplicity, many short links have been excluded from the visualization. For instance, it doesn’t show the intricate network of cables under the waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the South and East China Sea, the North Sea, and the Mediterranean Sea. The map instead aims to provide a global overview of the network, and a general sense of how information traverses our planet. (The findings reported below, however, are based on two analysis of the full submarine fibre-optic cable network, and not just the simplified representation shown in the illustration.)
The map also includes symbols referring to countries listed as “Enemies of the Internet” in the 2014 report of Reporters Without Borders. The centrality of the nodes within the network has been calculated using the PageRank algorithm. The rank is important as it highlights those geographical places where the network is most influenced by power (e.g., potential data surveillance) and weakness (e.g., potential service disruption).

Image: Internet Tube, by Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata.

The Internet is a Series of Tubes

Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata from the Oxford Internet Institute map the world’s submarine fibre-optic cables to appear like the London’s Tube Map (PDF). But they also go a few steps further.

Via Information Geographies

For the sake of simplicity, many short links have been excluded from the visualization. For instance, it doesn’t show the intricate network of cables under the waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the South and East China Sea, the North Sea, and the Mediterranean Sea. The map instead aims to provide a global overview of the network, and a general sense of how information traverses our planet. (The findings reported below, however, are based on two analysis of the full submarine fibre-optic cable network, and not just the simplified representation shown in the illustration.)

The map also includes symbols referring to countries listed as “Enemies of the Internet” in the 2014 report of Reporters Without Borders. The centrality of the nodes within the network has been calculated using the PageRank algorithm. The rank is important as it highlights those geographical places where the network is most influenced by power (e.g., potential data surveillance) and weakness (e.g., potential service disruption).

Image: Internet Tube, by Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata.