Posts tagged visualization

Princely Hair, 1978 - 2013
By Gary Card via Slate. Select to embiggen.

Princely Hair, 1978 - 2013

By Gary Card via Slate. Select to embiggen.

How Much Does it Need to Snow to Trigger a Snow Day?
Northern states, southern states, talk amongst yourselves.
Via atrubetskoy (Reddit). Select embiggen.

How Much Does it Need to Snow to Trigger a Snow Day?

Northern states, southern states, talk amongst yourselves.

Via atrubetskoy (Reddit). Select embiggen.

Illustrating Medicine, In History

Images and descriptions via Hagströmerbiblioteket where you can browse 15th through early-20th century illustrations of anatomy, biology, botany and more.

From top to bottom:

Georg Constantin
This extraordinary tattoo is one of over 100 chromolithographed plates in Hebra’s monumental atlas of skin diseases. It shows the naked Georg Constantin from Albania, whose 388 tattoos of all kinds of animals in red and blue cover his face and entire body. Atlas der Hautkrankheiten, (Vienna, 1856-1876)

Anatomical Plate
Hans von Gersdorff, surnamed ’Schylhans’ or ’Squinting Hans’, from Strasburg, was an army surgeon who took part in numerous campaigns, including the Burgundian War (1476). His widely circulated handbook of wound surgery, first published in 1517) was based on forty years of experience, chiefly in various military campaigns. It is illustrated with 25 full-page woodcuts by Hans Wechtlin including the first image in a book of an amputation. Feldtbuch der Wundartzney, (Augsburg, Heinrich Stayner, 1543)

Artificial Mechanical Hand
Paré was a French barber surgeon and the official Royal Surgeon for four successive French kings. He is considered one of the fathers of modern surgery, and a leader of surgical techniques. His collective works were published in several editions, a book of over 1000 pages richly illustrated with woodcuts and among them his inventions of both artificial hands and legs. Les Oeuvres. Quatrième édition, (Paris, 1585)

Anatomical Plate
One of the most spectacular anatomical atlases ever produced. Antonio Serrantoni was responsible for the drawing, engraving, and hand-colouring of the breathtaking plates, which were first published in natural size, in a volume in large elephant folio (70 x 100 cm), which was evidently impossible to use, but later reduced in a new version with the 75 engraved plates in normal folio size, printed in colours and finished by hand, each plate accompanied by a duplicate in outline. Anatomia Universale , (Florence, 1833)

Posted with Apologies to Minnesota

And the rest of you too.

Via The Weather Channel:

Daily record lows are possible Tuesday morning in Chicago, Detroit, and Dayton, Ohio, among other locations. This daily record cold will spread to the Deep South, while lingering in the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley Wednesday morning, possibly including Mobile, Ala. and Lake Charles, La.

Of course, that’s just the actual air temperature. Wind chills will be dangerously low at times early Monday and Tuesday. In the upper Mississippi Valley, northern Plains and western Great Lakes, wind chills will likely dip into the 30s and 40s below zero. Some spots near the Canadian border may even see 50s below zero.

For budding meteorologists, this isn’t another Polar Vortex. Instead, it’s an Alberta Clipper. From our close reading of the phenomenon, it appears we can blame Canada.

Images: Forecast maps via The Weather Channel.

Meanwhile, In Ukraine
Via EuroMaiden PR:

On the 25th of January, the protesters seized the state administration in 8 administrative regions of Ukraine.
In particular, the territory for this protest spread over Kyiv, Zhytomyr, Khmelnyts’ky, Rivne, Ternopil, Chernivtsi, Ivano-Frankivsk and Lviv oblast’. Protesters also blocked the regional state administration in Transcarpathia and Volyn oblast’.
In Cherkasy the police took control over the administration again.

H/T: @nycjim.

Meanwhile, In Ukraine

Via EuroMaiden PR:

On the 25th of January, the protesters seized the state administration in 8 administrative regions of Ukraine.

In particular, the territory for this protest spread over Kyiv, Zhytomyr, Khmelnyts’ky, Rivne, Ternopil, Chernivtsi, Ivano-Frankivsk and Lviv oblast’. Protesters also blocked the regional state administration in Transcarpathia and Volyn oblast’.

In Cherkasy the police took control over the administration again.

H/T: @nycjim.

Brace Yourself
Via CNN:

Much of the country will see the coldest temperatures in almost 20 years, the National Weather Service said. Some cities will experience chills 30 to 50 degrees below average.
To put things in perspective, the weather in Atlanta and Nashville on Monday will be colder than in Anchorage, Alaska.
And by Wednesday, nearly half the nation will shudder in temperatures of zero or lower, forecasters said…
…Throw in some fierce winds, and you get wind chills like 55 below zero in Duluth, Minnesota; minus 34 in Chicago; and minus 24 in St. Louis.

Image: National Weather Map for January 6, 8:45am EST, via Weather.com. Purples and light blues indicate sub-freezing temperature. Select to embiggen

Brace Yourself

Via CNN:

Much of the country will see the coldest temperatures in almost 20 years, the National Weather Service said. Some cities will experience chills 30 to 50 degrees below average.

To put things in perspective, the weather in Atlanta and Nashville on Monday will be colder than in Anchorage, Alaska.

And by Wednesday, nearly half the nation will shudder in temperatures of zero or lower, forecasters said…

…Throw in some fierce winds, and you get wind chills like 55 below zero in Duluth, Minnesota; minus 34 in Chicago; and minus 24 in St. Louis.

Image: National Weather Map for January 6, 8:45am EST, via Weather.com. Purples and light blues indicate sub-freezing temperature. Select to embiggen

Mapping 400,000 Hours of US TV News
Via the Internet Archive:

We are excited to unveil a couple experimental data-driven visualizations that literally map 400,000 hours of U.S. television news. One of our collaborating scholars, Kalev Leetaru, applied “fulltext geocoding” software to our entire television news research service collection. These algorithms scan the closed captioning of each broadcast looking for any mention of a location anywhere in the world, disambiguate them using the surrounding discussion (Springfield, Illinois vs Springfield, Massachusetts), and ultimately map each location. The resulting CartoDB visualizations provide what we believe is one of the first large-scale glimpses of the geography of American television news, beginning to reveal which areas receive outsized attention and which are neglected….
…What you see here represents our very first experiment with revealing the geography of television news and required bringing together a bunch of cutting-edge technologies that are still very much active areas of research. While there is still lots of work to be done, we think this represents a tremendously exciting prototype for new ways of interacting with the world’s information by organizing it geographically and putting it on a map where it belongs!

There are two ways to explore the visualization: one is to watch news mentions of different places in the world each day, the other is to select a TV station and time window and see what it reported on.
Related: This former librarian single-handedly taped 35 years of TV news. This one’s well worth the read. Marion Stokes recorded Philadelphia news stations from 1977 - 2012, and a batch of the 140,000 VHS tapes she produced is being digitized by The Internet Archive.
Image: Screenshot, TV News Archive, via the Internet Archive. Select to embiggen.

Mapping 400,000 Hours of US TV News

Via the Internet Archive:

We are excited to unveil a couple experimental data-driven visualizations that literally map 400,000 hours of U.S. television news. One of our collaborating scholars, Kalev Leetaru, applied “fulltext geocoding” software to our entire television news research service collection. These algorithms scan the closed captioning of each broadcast looking for any mention of a location anywhere in the world, disambiguate them using the surrounding discussion (Springfield, Illinois vs Springfield, Massachusetts), and ultimately map each location. The resulting CartoDB visualizations provide what we believe is one of the first large-scale glimpses of the geography of American television news, beginning to reveal which areas receive outsized attention and which are neglected….

…What you see here represents our very first experiment with revealing the geography of television news and required bringing together a bunch of cutting-edge technologies that are still very much active areas of research. While there is still lots of work to be done, we think this represents a tremendously exciting prototype for new ways of interacting with the world’s information by organizing it geographically and putting it on a map where it belongs!

There are two ways to explore the visualization: one is to watch news mentions of different places in the world each day, the other is to select a TV station and time window and see what it reported on.

Related: This former librarian single-handedly taped 35 years of TV news. This one’s well worth the read. Marion Stokes recorded Philadelphia news stations from 1977 - 2012, and a batch of the 140,000 VHS tapes she produced is being digitized by The Internet Archive.

Image: Screenshot, TV News Archive, via the Internet Archive. Select to embiggen.

Census Bureau Releases Mapping Tool
The US Census Bureau today released an updated set of statistics based on its nation-wide, 2008-2012 American Community Survey. Along with it, the Bureau’s created an interactive map to allow users to visually explore communities across the country.
Via the US Census Bureau:

The new application allows users to map out different social, economic and housing characteristics of their state, county or census tract, and to see how these areas have changed since the 1990 and 2000 censuses. The mapping tool is powered by American Community Survey statistics from the Census Bureau’s API, an application programming interface that allows developers to take data sets and reuse them to create online and mobile apps.

Site visitors can explore eight core statistics (eg, median household income, total population and education levels) via the map.
Those with coding chops can hit up the Census Bureau’s API to develop creations of their own. The API gives access to 40 social, economic and housing topics.
Image: Screenshot, Census Explorer.

Census Bureau Releases Mapping Tool

The US Census Bureau today released an updated set of statistics based on its nation-wide, 2008-2012 American Community Survey. Along with it, the Bureau’s created an interactive map to allow users to visually explore communities across the country.

Via the US Census Bureau:

The new application allows users to map out different social, economic and housing characteristics of their state, county or census tract, and to see how these areas have changed since the 1990 and 2000 censuses. The mapping tool is powered by American Community Survey statistics from the Census Bureau’s API, an application programming interface that allows developers to take data sets and reuse them to create online and mobile apps.

Site visitors can explore eight core statistics (eg, median household income, total population and education levels) via the map.

Those with coding chops can hit up the Census Bureau’s API to develop creations of their own. The API gives access to 40 social, economic and housing topics.

Image: Screenshot, Census Explorer.

Visualizing Our Drone Future

Via Alex Cornell:

Our Drone Future explores the technology, capability, and purpose of drones, as their presence becomes an increasingly pervasive reality in the skies of tomorrow.

In the near future, cities use semi-autonomous drones for urban security. Human officers monitor drone feeds remotely, and data reports are displayed with a detailed HUD and communicated via a simulated human voice (designed to mitigate discomfort with sentient drone technology). While the drones operate independently, they are “guided” by the human monitors, who can suggest alternate mission plans and ask questions.

Specializing in predictive analysis, the security drones can retask themselves to investigate potential threats. As shown in this video, an urban security drone surveys San Francisco’s landmarks and encounters fierce civilian resistance.

Run Time: ~3:00.

Hard Drives
Via Chad Wittke.

Hard Drives

Via Chad Wittke.

Jay Z’s Most Name-Dropped Products, By Album
Via Vanity Fair. Select to embiggen.

Jay Z’s Most Name-Dropped Products, By Album

Via Vanity Fair. Select to embiggen.

Internet Populations
Cartograms are interesting. Instead of displaying political boundaries, they show data boundaries. So, for example, mapping the world across social and economic indicators.
Here, though, is Internet penetration, via the Oxford Internet Institute. It represents who’s online and where.
Via The Atlantic

The map, created as part of the Information Geographies project at the Oxford Internet Institute, has two layers of information: the absolute size of the online population by country (rendered in geographical space) and the percent of the overall population that represents (rendered by color). Thus, Canada, with a relatively small number of people takes up little space, but is colored dark red, because more than 80 percent of people are online. China, by contrast, is huge, with more than half a billion people online, but relatively lightly shaded, since more than half the population is not online. Lightly colored countries that have large populations, such as China, India, and Indonesia, are where the Internet will grow the most in the years ahead.

And, via the Oxford Institute’s Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata, some trends:

First, the rise of Asia as the main contributor to the world’s Internet population; 42% of the world’s Internet users live in Asia, and China, India, and Japan alone host more Internet users than Europe and North America combined…
…The map also reveals interesting patterns in some of the world’s poorest countries. Most Latin American countries now can count over 40% of their citizens as Internet users. Because of this, Latin America as a whole now hosts almost as many Internet users as the United States.
Some African countries have seen staggering growth, whereas other have seen little change since we last mapped Internet use globally in 2008. In the last three years, almost all North African countries doubled their population of Internet users (Algeria being a notable exception). Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa, also saw massive growth. However, it remains that over half of Sub-Saharan African countries have an Internet penetration of less than 10%, and have seen very little grow in recent years.
It is therefore important to remember that despite the massive impacts that the Internet has on everyday life for many people, most people on our planet remain entirely disconnected. Only one third of the world’s population has access to the Internet.

FJP: Global mobile penetration? At 6.8 billion mobile subscribers, that’s another story. So, disconnected in a sense. But being mobile can be very connected.
Image: Internet Population and Penetration, via the Oxford Internet Institute. Select to embiggen.

Internet Populations

Cartograms are interesting. Instead of displaying political boundaries, they show data boundaries. So, for example, mapping the world across social and economic indicators.

Here, though, is Internet penetration, via the Oxford Internet Institute. It represents who’s online and where.

Via The Atlantic

The map, created as part of the Information Geographies project at the Oxford Internet Institute, has two layers of information: the absolute size of the online population by country (rendered in geographical space) and the percent of the overall population that represents (rendered by color). Thus, Canada, with a relatively small number of people takes up little space, but is colored dark red, because more than 80 percent of people are online. China, by contrast, is huge, with more than half a billion people online, but relatively lightly shaded, since more than half the population is not online. Lightly colored countries that have large populations, such as China, India, and Indonesia, are where the Internet will grow the most in the years ahead.

And, via the Oxford Institute’s Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata, some trends:

First, the rise of Asia as the main contributor to the world’s Internet population; 42% of the world’s Internet users live in Asia, and China, India, and Japan alone host more Internet users than Europe and North America combined…

…The map also reveals interesting patterns in some of the world’s poorest countries. Most Latin American countries now can count over 40% of their citizens as Internet users. Because of this, Latin America as a whole now hosts almost as many Internet users as the United States.

Some African countries have seen staggering growth, whereas other have seen little change since we last mapped Internet use globally in 2008. In the last three years, almost all North African countries doubled their population of Internet users (Algeria being a notable exception). Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa, also saw massive growth. However, it remains that over half of Sub-Saharan African countries have an Internet penetration of less than 10%, and have seen very little grow in recent years.

It is therefore important to remember that despite the massive impacts that the Internet has on everyday life for many people, most people on our planet remain entirely disconnected. Only one third of the world’s population has access to the Internet.

FJP: Global mobile penetration? At 6.8 billion mobile subscribers, that’s another story. So, disconnected in a sense. But being mobile can be very connected.

Image: Internet Population and Penetration, via the Oxford Internet Institute. Select to embiggen.

Visualizing the Bible

Top: textual cross-references within the Bible via Chris Harrison:

The bar graph that runs along the bottom represents all of the chapters in the Bible. Books alternate in color between white and light gray. The length of each bar denotes the number of verses in the chapter. Each of the 63,779 cross references found in the Bible is depicted by a single arc - the color corresponds to the distance between the two chapters, creating a rainbow-like effect.

Bottom: applying sentiment analysis in the Bible, via OpenBible:

This visualization explores the ups and downs of the Bible narrative, using sentiment analysis to quantify when positive and negative events are happening…

Things start off well with creation, turn negative with Job and the patriarchs, improve again with Moses, dip with the period of the judges, recover with David, and have a mixed record (especially negative when Samaria is around) during the monarchy. The exilic period isn’t as negative as you might expect, nor the return period as positive. In the New Testament, things start off fine with Jesus, then quickly turn negative as opposition to his message grows. The story of the early church, especially in the epistles, is largely positive.

For more examples of biblical visualizations, visit The Guardian.

Images: Visiting the source links above gives you biggie versions. Alternatively, select to embiggen.

Digital Media Might Be Making a Cash Comeback
Via the Economist:

After years of wreaking havoc, the internet is helping media companies to grow. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), a professional-services firm, reckons that revenues for online media and entertainment will increase by around 13% a year for the next five years. Even in music, which took the biggest hit from the internet, downloads are something to sing about. For the first time in over a decade global music-industry revenues grew last year, by about 0.2%, according to the IFPI, a trade group. Online sales just about made up for the drop in physical ones for the first time. Subscription services, such as Spotify and Deezer, let people stream songs over the internet either for a subscription or free with adverts. Online radio is also growing. On-demand and radio streaming services raked in about $1 billion, 15% of the industry’s revenues in America in 2012.

Read the rest of the Economist’s discussion here about how “digital pennies” are stacking up, transforming digital media disruptors like Spotify, YouTube, Netflix, and Hulu into cash … calves. 
Related: The PwC report referenced by the Economist (Global entertainment and media outlook) is here, with macro as well as country- and industry-specific projections.
Image: The Economist via PwC, graph of forecasted spending on digital and non-digital media spending in the next five years

Digital Media Might Be Making a Cash Comeback

Via the Economist:

After years of wreaking havoc, the internet is helping media companies to grow. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), a professional-services firm, reckons that revenues for online media and entertainment will increase by around 13% a year for the next five years. Even in music, which took the biggest hit from the internet, downloads are something to sing about. For the first time in over a decade global music-industry revenues grew last year, by about 0.2%, according to the IFPI, a trade group. Online sales just about made up for the drop in physical ones for the first time. Subscription services, such as Spotify and Deezer, let people stream songs over the internet either for a subscription or free with adverts. Online radio is also growing. On-demand and radio streaming services raked in about $1 billion, 15% of the industry’s revenues in America in 2012.

Read the rest of the Economist’s discussion here about how “digital pennies” are stacking up, transforming digital media disruptors like Spotify, YouTube, Netflix, and Hulu into cash … calves. 

Related: The PwC report referenced by the Economist (Global entertainment and media outlook) is here, with macro as well as country- and industry-specific projections.

Image: The Economist via PwC, graph of forecasted spending on digital and non-digital media spending in the next five years