Posts tagged web design

This Day in History: The First Web Site
shaneguiter:

First ever website brought back to life at its original URL | The Verge

FJP — Via The Verge:

April 30th may seem as ordinary as any other date, but in 1993 it marked an important milestone in the development of global communications: it was on that day that the World Wide Web entered the public domain. CERN, the same research group that’s presently busy smashing protons together using the Large Hadron Collider, made World Wide Web technologies available to everyone on a royalty-free basis. Without that enlightened decision, backed by web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee, we might never have enjoyed the glories of GIFs, ubiquitous social networking, and instant music streaming.

This Day in History: The First Web Site

shaneguiter:

First ever website brought back to life at its original URL | The Verge

FJP — Via The Verge:

April 30th may seem as ordinary as any other date, but in 1993 it marked an important milestone in the development of global communications: it was on that day that the World Wide Web entered the public domain. CERN, the same research group that’s presently busy smashing protons together using the Large Hadron Collider, made World Wide Web technologies available to everyone on a royalty-free basis. Without that enlightened decision, backed by web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee, we might never have enjoyed the glories of GIFs, ubiquitous social networking, and instant music streaming.

Every Fucking Web Site
The morning PSA.
Designers, communicators, marketers and brand strategists: take note.
Personal favorite under header number three: “Because we saw three buckets of shit content on our competitor’s front page and we’re god damned if we’re only gonna have two.” — Michael
H/T: @lorakolodny 

Every Fucking Web Site

The morning PSA.

Designers, communicators, marketers and brand strategists: take note.

Personal favorite under header number three: “Because we saw three buckets of shit content on our competitor’s front page and we’re god damned if we’re only gonna have two.” — Michael

H/T: @lorakolodny 

Some time in the late 90s, most newspaper and news sites settled on a model favoured by the early Internet Service Providers like Yahoo! and AOL. The homepage was the behemoth, the thinking went, that everyone would be drawn to like moths to a flame.

The logic however, has begun to break down. Articles and what the one time major homepages like msn.com wanted you to look at have seeped into your webmail user interface so the need to go to the homepage has dropped. At the same time, social media meant that the Internet was buzzing with links that went directly to what users find of interest. So has that impacted the homepage idea?

If the latest developments in online design of Britain’s ITV news are anything to go by, yes. The new design apes that of the familiar liveblog or twitter stream and makes a very strong case for the new way of thinking.

Instead of making every page a home page, this new design is a lot “stickier” in that users visiting the page aren’t those looking for something specific, they’re looking for the latest news. Adding to this, the site also makes updating breaking news far more intuitive, with the ability to pull in tweets from ITV news correspondents or anything else on the web. It’s the page CNNi should be really.

It may mean low page views but the user engagement should be more like Facebook’s, Pinterest or our beloved Tumblr.

Hipster Ipsum let’s web designers fill in those blank spaces with the lingo the coolest kids we know are using. 
H/T Swiss Miss

Hipster Ipsum let’s web designers fill in those blank spaces with the lingo the coolest kids we know are using. 

H/T Swiss Miss

Detail from This is Why Your Newspaper is Dying by Brad Colbow. 
Learn some tech and web lessons from Smashing Cartoons via Smashing Magazine

Learn some tech and web lessons from Smashing Cartoons via Smashing Magazine


Infographics For Web Designers: Information You Ought To Know

Infographics For Web Designers: Information You Ought To Know

The control which designers know in the print medium, and often desire in the web medium, is simply a function of the limitation of the printed page. We should embrace the fact that the web doesn’t have the same constraints, and design for this flexibility. But first, we must “accept the ebb and flow of things.”
John Allsopp, A Dao of Web Design.