Posts tagged wireless

Where Wireless Speeds of 2.56 Terabytes Per Second Just Happened

Researchers have harnessed streams of light to transfer massive amounts of data. In a recent test, they hit 2.56 terabytes per second. Simplify the language and that’s about the equivalent of transferring over 67,000 songs per second.

Before getting too giddy, this was an experiment over one meter. Still though, add this to a very interesting, data heavy future.

Via TechSpot:

Researchers at USC, JPL and Tel Aviv University have managed to transfer 2.56 terabits of information by multiplexing 8 x 300Gbps “twisted” streams of visible light into a single beam. The feat exploits a phenomenon which, up until recently, scientists thought may have been impossible to achieve with light: orbital angular momentum (OAM).

OAM, the way a wave can be made to twist around itself, is what makes the team’s discovery particularly exciting. It also makes their findings incredibly useful for wireless data transmission. Making light beams spiral to create an optical vortex is not necessarily a new idea, but putting that phenomenon to work for the transmitting information is something researchers have been striving for.

TechSpot, Scientists hit wireless speeds of 2.56Tbps using light vortex beams.

iPads and a paperless world from the past
Reminiscing over Encyclopedia Britannica’s just retired print edition, Bob Stein of if:book has posted a few drawings he and then-Atari Chief Scientist Alan Kay made 30 years ago, imagining a future similar to today, with people using what they called the Intelligent Encyclopedia.

The most interesting thing for me today about these images is that although we foresaw that people would be accessing information wirelessly (notice the little antenna on the device in the “tide pool” image, we completely missed the most important aspect of the network — that it was going to connect people to other people.

iPads and a paperless world from the past

Reminiscing over Encyclopedia Britannica’s just retired print edition, Bob Stein of if:book has posted a few drawings he and then-Atari Chief Scientist Alan Kay made 30 years ago, imagining a future similar to today, with people using what they called the Intelligent Encyclopedia.

The most interesting thing for me today about these images is that although we foresaw that people would be accessing information wirelessly (notice the little antenna on the device in the “tide pool” image, we completely missed the most important aspect of the network — that it was going to connect people to other people.

Another 1%

All around impressively smart person Luke Wroblewski tells us that when it comes to wireless network and mobile use, there’s another kind of 1%.

  • 1% of bandwidth consumers account for half of all wireless traffic worldwide in the World. The top 10% of users are consuming 90% of wireless bandwidth. (source)
  • In 2009, the top 3% of heavy users generated 40% of wireless network traffic. Now, these users account for 70% of the traffic. (source)
  • Finns consume on average 1 gigabyte of wireless data a month over an operator’s network, almost 10 times the European average. (source)
  • Voice recognition software Siri has prompted owners of the iPhone 4S to use almost twice as much data as iPhone 4 users. (source)

Visit his post for more mobile and wireless data.