Posts tagged with ‘youtube’

How the Internet Works, Part 867, Reddit Edition
An infectious twelve-ish-year-old boy going by the name Sir Fedora posted a video on YouTube the other day celebrating the fact that the very first video he ever posted had received a like.
Not one among many or one like from someone particularly special. Just, simply, a single like. As in that first integer between zero and two. And that one like made that 12-ish-year-old happy.
So he celebrated with a new video.
Meantime, a Redditor stumbled across Sir Fedora’s video and posted this:

Incredibly enthusiastic, weird kid makes a video celebrating getting 1 YouTube like. Would be funny to get him a few subs and see his reaction.

The Internet, as the Internet is sometimes wont to do, took over. Or, at least, Reddit did.
Introducing: Operation Through The Roof.
Sir Fedora’s video celebrating his one like is now pushing a million views. He has over 70 thousand YouTube subscribers. Over on his recently started Twitter account he has over 46 thousand followers.
All because he was enthused by one like, and someone else liked that.
We all start somewhere.
Meantime, a Giant Panda tumbles about in the snow.
Image: Operation Through The Roof, via dragonboltz.

How the Internet Works, Part 867, Reddit Edition

An infectious twelve-ish-year-old boy going by the name Sir Fedora posted a video on YouTube the other day celebrating the fact that the very first video he ever posted had received a like.

Not one among many or one like from someone particularly special. Just, simply, a single like. As in that first integer between zero and two. And that one like made that 12-ish-year-old happy.

So he celebrated with a new video.

Meantime, a Redditor stumbled across Sir Fedora’s video and posted this:

Incredibly enthusiastic, weird kid makes a video celebrating getting 1 YouTube like. Would be funny to get him a few subs and see his reaction.

The Internet, as the Internet is sometimes wont to do, took over. Or, at least, Reddit did.

Introducing: Operation Through The Roof.

Sir Fedora’s video celebrating his one like is now pushing a million views. He has over 70 thousand YouTube subscribers. Over on his recently started Twitter account he has over 46 thousand followers.

All because he was enthused by one like, and someone else liked that.

We all start somewhere.

Meantime, a Giant Panda tumbles about in the snow.

Image: Operation Through The Roof, via dragonboltz.

Post to YouTube? You'll Need a License for That →

Via Global Voices Advocacy:

This week’s report begins in Saudi Arabia where government officials say they will soon require Internet users to obtain a state-issued permit in order to post videos on YouTube. Videos would be evaluated based on their consistency with Saudi “culture, values and tradition.” The policy could have troublesome implications for activists, whose strategic use of YouTube for actions like the Women2Drive campaign has brought international attention to the issue. Saudi citizens reportedly boast the highest YouTube usage rate per capita in the world.

A Saudi judge recommended that blogger Raif Badawi face charges of apostasy, or denouncing Islam, before the country’s high court. Individuals convicted of apostasy in Saudi Arabia typically receive the death penalty. Last summer, Badawi was convicted of insulting Islam on his blog, Free Saudi Liberals, and sentenced to seven years in prison and 600 lashes. The current recommendation came after Badawi’s lawyers appealed the decision.

FJP: Maybe the Kingdom’s tired of seeing videos such as these. Or these. Or these. Or these.

Tween Girls Ask The Internet If They’re Pretty or Ugly

Am I Pretty or Ugly” is a social media phenomenon where tween girls post YouTube videos of themselves and ask viewers to tell them if they’re pretty or ugly. All of the videos have more or less the same “script;” the girls will say that some people tell them they’re pretty, and some people tell them they’re ugly, but they just want to know “the truth.” They then request that people leave a comment with their opinion on whether or not they’re attractive.

A global study conducted for Dove’s Real Beauty Campaign revealed that 90 percent of 15-to 17-year-old girls are dissatisfied with their physical appearance. 13 percent of them admit to having an eating disorder and nearly a quarter of them would consider plastic surgery.

So the fact that adolescent girls don’t like their bodies and they’re straight up asking the Internet whether or not they’re attractive is unfortunate — but not shocking. 

In 1997, adolescent girls identified the mass media as their primary source for health and body image information — and that was before the Internet really took off.

Now in 2013, social media is becoming the preferred source of body image information for young girls, and they’re trusting Internet users to give them “the truth” about their appearance. This so-called “truth” is hurting them — with 68 percent of girls saying they’ve had negative experiences on social networking sites and 53 percent of them becoming unhappy with their bodies by age 13

Tumblr blogs like “Fuck Yeah Thigh Gap” and  “Bikini Bridge” urge women to look bony and frighteningly thin in order to be hot. And we can’t forget Thinspiration — where girls encourage each other to be anorexic or bulimic for the sake of “attractiveness.” 

FJP: The ironic thing about girls turning to social media to determine whether or not they’re attractive is that most adolescent girls present false images of themselves on the Internet.

Seventy-four percent of girls agree that most girls their age use social media sites to make themselves look “cooler” than they are in real life, and forty-one percent of them admit that this describes them, according to a 2010 study by Girl Scouts. 

If you take away the Instagram filters, Photoshop, creative camera angles, and the sweet Tumblr layouts, what do you have left? Normal tween girls with zits and cellulite, most likely. 

If these girls are looking at Photoshopped images of one another all day long, their ideas of what’s physically achievable is going to be tragically skewed. Actresses and models still seem larger than life to a lot of young girls. But when tweens see their own friends looking impossibly good in their photos, the pressure to be pretty is far more intense. The “Am I Pretty or Ugly” YouTube videos are a clear indicator that the body image pressure levels for tween girls are officially in the danger zone. — Krissy

Vintage Social Media Ads

Sao Paulo-based agency Moma Propaganda released a series of vintage social media posters for the Maximidia Seminars ad campaign, “Everything Ages Fast.”

Images: Illusion

YouTube Wins First Emmy for Its Recommendation Algorithm, Not for Web Series
via The Verge:

The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences said today that the Google-owned video service has won a technical Emmy for its personalized video recommendations. The Emmy honors the computer science that powers YouTube’s recommendation algorithm, which suggests clips to watch based on a person’s viewing history, popular videos, and other signals.
The Emmy, which will be presented in January at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, recognizes YouTube’s efforts to guide its 1 billion monthly users through the world’s largest video library. “What’s remarkable is that the biggest problem we hear from viewers is they can’t find anything to watch on YouTube,” said Cristos Goodrow, an engineering director at the company. “Our job on the discovery team is to help solve that problem for the viewers.”
… Serious efforts to recommend related videos to YouTube users began in 2008, three years into the site’s existence and two years after Google acquired it. That’s when YouTube began suggesting other videos for users to watch, both on its home page and on the right-hand side of individual video pages. By the end of 2008, the algorithm was responsible for “hundreds of thousands of hours” of additional video viewing each day, Goodrow says. Today, he says, that number is in the millions.

FJP: This follows earlier speculation that YouTube could win an Emmy for original programming this year. YouTube is moving toward a more television-like feel, which makes it interesting that — as The Verge points out — it “won its first Emmy for the quality that makes it so unlike television: an algorithm that makes the site feel deeply personal.” - Shining
Image: Screenshot of YouTube’s suggestions after Miley Cyrus’ video for “We Can’t Stop" (which no one should ever watch)

YouTube Wins First Emmy for Its Recommendation Algorithm, Not for Web Series

via The Verge:

The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences said today that the Google-owned video service has won a technical Emmy for its personalized video recommendations. The Emmy honors the computer science that powers YouTube’s recommendation algorithm, which suggests clips to watch based on a person’s viewing history, popular videos, and other signals.

The Emmy, which will be presented in January at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, recognizes YouTube’s efforts to guide its 1 billion monthly users through the world’s largest video library. “What’s remarkable is that the biggest problem we hear from viewers is they can’t find anything to watch on YouTube,” said Cristos Goodrow, an engineering director at the company. “Our job on the discovery team is to help solve that problem for the viewers.”

… Serious efforts to recommend related videos to YouTube users began in 2008, three years into the site’s existence and two years after Google acquired it. That’s when YouTube began suggesting other videos for users to watch, both on its home page and on the right-hand side of individual video pages. By the end of 2008, the algorithm was responsible for “hundreds of thousands of hours” of additional video viewing each day, Goodrow says. Today, he says, that number is in the millions.

FJP: This follows earlier speculation that YouTube could win an Emmy for original programming this year. YouTube is moving toward a more television-like feel, which makes it interesting that — as The Verge points out — it “won its first Emmy for the quality that makes it so unlike television: an algorithm that makes the site feel deeply personal.” - Shining

Image: Screenshot of YouTube’s suggestions after Miley Cyrus’ video for “We Can’t Stop" (which no one should ever watch)

Louis CK Animation About Global Warming

John Roney created an animated video tribute to Louis CK featuring the comedian’s bit on what God would say to humans about global warming if He were to return to Earth.

Spoiler: “What the fuck did you do?!”

Funny Social Media Accounts

Behold! An FJP round up of five hilarious social media accounts that are worth a gander:

1. The new YouTube channel, FaceMashups, digitally merges celebrity bodies, faces, and voices together to create bizarre interview segments.

2. Photographer, Flora Borsi, photoshops herself into old photographs to make it look like she’s taking pictures of past events with her cell phone. View the Facebook album here.

3. Twitter user, @YouSoPretentious, takes pictures of handwritten notes that make fun of typical social media photos and posts them to the Instagram account, Satiregram. The notes say things like, “An attempt at being artsy by taking short clips of nature and the sky. How nice,” “A BLT from a local diner,” and “Oh, look. Another picture of a cat.” 

4. The Twitter account, @FakeAPStyleBook posts ridiculous tips for “proper writing,” and pokes fun at AP Style with tweets like “Today we will be publishing a list of words you should no longer use in any publication. Adjust style books accordingly.”

5. YouTuber, Dom Mazzetti, hosts BroScienceLife, a channel featuring what he calls “Bro Science,” — ”lifting advice from an unqualified bro who looks like he works out.” Each week Mazzetti plays the role of a bro (a male who typically loves to party and talk about going to the gym) and chooses a new “bro-topic” to make fun of. 

Video: Will Ferrell & Natalie Portman’s FaceMashUp

Puppets Explain Basics of YouTube Copyright

Puppets, Glove and Boots, and copyright lawyer, Fred von Lohmann, star in YouTube’s Copyright Basics video. The video explains everything from filing a complaint to fair use — intercutting the important information with clips of singing puppet apes. 

For more details on the subject, you can check out YouTube’s Copyright Center.

Astronaut Wrings Out Wash Cloth In Space

Astronaut Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency demonstrates water’s reaction to being wrung from a wash cloth in zero gravity. His video is a response to 10th graders in Nova Scotia who won a CSA  contest because of their science experiment with surface tension in outer space.

FJP: If you check out the CSA’s YouTube channel, you’ll find more sweet cosmic how-to’s — like how to clip your nails and how to sleep in space.

And for all my fellow Trekkies out there, this one’s for you: Chris Hatfield’s space convo with William Shatner.Krissy

YouTube Does the Harlem Shake

There’s no escaping it.

Nifty bit of programming though.

YouTube Wins News Innovation Award →

Via VentureBeat:

YouTube won a News Innovation Award from the International Center for Journalists last night. Ironically, that’s just a day before the Israeli army used the service, along with Twitter and its own blog, to almost livecast the assassination of a Hamas leader.

YouTube has become a massive news destination, YouTube chief executive Salar Kamangar said in his acceptance speech, with 7000 hours of news-related footage uploaded every single day. Fully a third of searches on YouTube are news-related, and after the March earthquake in Japan this year, the top 20 YouTube videos of the disaster were watched almost 100 million times.

The problem, he said, that traditional media has with online media is that ‘they don’t get you can’t just put plastic robot anchors on and expect people to take it seriously. The younger audience doesn’t buy it. That’s our advantage; we’re honest with the audience, and they can tell we’re real.’

What Cenk Uygur’s Success Says About the Future of Media (Digiday)

Uygur is host and creator of “The Young Turks,” a political show on YouTube and carried by Current TV. The 42-year-old has built up a large and loyal fanbase in the last seven years. He does a daily live stream — “TYT” has 413,00 subscribers who have watched its videos a whopping 850 million times — and since December 2011, “TYT” has had a nightly one-hour show on Current TV. But Uygur, whose show is focused on politics, hasn’t stopped there. In the last two years, “TYT” has added eight other shows to its fledgling network, ranging from a film review show to a sports show and a college-focused show. The Young Turks Network is a modern video network, all owned and operated by Uygur and team, and it runs through YouTube.

Related: NPR’s special series on the future of TV: How We Watch What We Watch

Media Criticism
Via Adam Schweigert.

Media Criticism

Via Adam Schweigert.

The Hidden Cost of Hamburgers

Two things here: this animation is part of the Center for Investigative Reporting’s Food for 9 Billion series, a yearlong look at the challenge of feeding the world.

It’s also now part of The I Files, a new investigative channel on YouTube that will be curated by the CIR and draw from sources around the world.

Via CIR:

Edited by the Center for Investigative Reporting in Berkeley, Calif., The I Files will be a showcase for the best investigative news videos from around the world – stories that investigate power, reveal secrets and illuminate your world. Our motto: Dig deep.

Our contributors include major media players such as The New York Times, BBC, ABC and Al-Jazeera, as well as public television’s ITVS and a host of independent reporters and producers. We will be working in association with the Investigative News Network and its coalition of 60 nonprofit news organizations, from ProPublica to the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University.

This is, of course, an experiment, yet another new venture in a media environment where the Web has splintered audiences into thousands of niche markets. But there is a method to our madness.

YouTube, just seven years old, is a vast and rapidly changing media environment, and within the almost incomprehensibly large YouTube universe, news videos have begun to find an audience amid the entertainment and clutter. It’s news that is often raw and citizen-generated – like footage of the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami – but increasingly, it’s also professional news from established broadcasters.

A new study by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism confirms the trend of people turning to YouTube as a source of news and information, especially in times of disaster – whether natural (a volcanic eruption in Iceland) or unnatural (the recent mass shooting in Aurora, Colo.). TV is still, by far, the No. 1 source of news for most Americans, but the Pew report found that YouTube has established itself as a rapidly expanding platform for “a new form of video journalism … where professional journalism mingles with citizen content.”

Stephen Talbot, CIR, The I Files brings investigative news to YouTube.